2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162520
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Service Excellence as a Way of Life in the ED
Abstract:
Service Excellence as a Way of Life in the ED
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:DeMarco, Frank, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Duke University Hospital
Title:Clinical Operations Director
Contact Address:Duke Hospital Erwin Road, Durham, NC, 27703, USA
Co-Authors:Candi Van Vleet, RN, MBA, NREMT-P; Ann White, RN, MSN, CCNS, CEN;
[Annual Conference] Clinical topic: Patient satisfaction is a long standing, but limited metric used in tandem with other metrics to evaluate overall quality in the emergency department (ED). The actual score derived from a contracted third party has never been easily translated into the culture and overall "work" of the bedside clinician in a meaningful way. As a strategy to raise the satisfaction score, staff are commonly told, "You need to be nicer to the patient and their families." What that really means is never clear as context is not provided through actual stories of patients and families. To achieve greater quality, this ED created a more overarching goal to strive for a culture of service excellence.

Implementation: An interprofessional team dedicated to service excellence brainstormed strategies through site visits, benchmarking, and literature review. The overall strategic plan designed by the staff led Service Excellence Core Team included the following: customer service training for all staff, a dedicated nurse greeter, reassessment of all patients waiting for treatment, a video displayed in the waiting room with repeating information about patient visit expectations and patient acuity and flow process, grease boards in each room with the patient's caregivers' names listed, bed side reporting by nurses during patient handoff, administrative rounding, standing orders, a dedicated Patient Visitor Representative, real time patient satisfaction surveying at the point of care that includes service recovery if needed, and phoning treated and released patients back within 24 hours of discharge by the emergency medicine physicians.

Outcomes: From 08 July through 08 December patient satisfaction scores rose by 12% (77.3 to 86.6). Closer analysis demonstrates a 3 % increase from 08 July through 08 September but double that number (6%) 08 October through 08 December. Initiatives that were in place during the slow growth months were the nurse greeter, standing orders, and the Patient Visitor Representative. It is during the fast growth months that the initiatives of all staff completing customer service training 100% reassessments of all waiting patients, a video display in the waiting room, real time patient satisfaction surveying, calling treated and released patients back within 24 hours, grease boards in each room, bed side reporting, and administrative rounding changed perceptions. The most effective strategy that impacted patient satisfaction scores and created an ED culture of service excellence were real time surveys given at the point of care. Immediate service recovery was invaluable. These surveys correlated with third party data that showed keeping patients and families informed of progress with their treatment plan is their greatest need. This overwhelming real time data motivated physicians and nurses to change their communication approach. The next strategy with the most impact was the implementation of nurse bedside report. Patients and families shared that they felt more involved in their care and a closer rapport was established with the care team.

Recommendations: To sustain a culture of service excellence, strategies to impact patient satisfaction need to move from unspecific and vague with no real context to meaningful initiatives, validated by the customer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleService Excellence as a Way of Life in the EDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162520-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Service Excellence as a Way of Life in the ED</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DeMarco, Frank, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Duke University Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Operations Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Duke Hospital Erwin Road, Durham, NC, 27703, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Candi Van Vleet, RN, MBA, NREMT-P; Ann White, RN, MSN, CCNS, CEN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Annual Conference] Clinical topic: Patient satisfaction is a long standing, but limited metric used in tandem with other metrics to evaluate overall quality in the emergency department (ED). The actual score derived from a contracted third party has never been easily translated into the culture and overall &quot;work&quot; of the bedside clinician in a meaningful way. As a strategy to raise the satisfaction score, staff are commonly told, &quot;You need to be nicer to the patient and their families.&quot; What that really means is never clear as context is not provided through actual stories of patients and families. To achieve greater quality, this ED created a more overarching goal to strive for a culture of service excellence. <br/><br/>Implementation: An interprofessional team dedicated to service excellence brainstormed strategies through site visits, benchmarking, and literature review. The overall strategic plan designed by the staff led Service Excellence Core Team included the following: customer service training for all staff, a dedicated nurse greeter, reassessment of all patients waiting for treatment, a video displayed in the waiting room with repeating information about patient visit expectations and patient acuity and flow process, grease boards in each room with the patient's caregivers' names listed, bed side reporting by nurses during patient handoff, administrative rounding, standing orders, a dedicated Patient Visitor Representative, real time patient satisfaction surveying at the point of care that includes service recovery if needed, and phoning treated and released patients back within 24 hours of discharge by the emergency medicine physicians. <br/><br/>Outcomes: From 08 July through 08 December patient satisfaction scores rose by 12% (77.3 to 86.6). Closer analysis demonstrates a 3 % increase from 08 July through 08 September but double that number (6%) 08 October through 08 December. Initiatives that were in place during the slow growth months were the nurse greeter, standing orders, and the Patient Visitor Representative. It is during the fast growth months that the initiatives of all staff completing customer service training 100% reassessments of all waiting patients, a video display in the waiting room, real time patient satisfaction surveying, calling treated and released patients back within 24 hours, grease boards in each room, bed side reporting, and administrative rounding changed perceptions. The most effective strategy that impacted patient satisfaction scores and created an ED culture of service excellence were real time surveys given at the point of care. Immediate service recovery was invaluable. These surveys correlated with third party data that showed keeping patients and families informed of progress with their treatment plan is their greatest need. This overwhelming real time data motivated physicians and nurses to change their communication approach. The next strategy with the most impact was the implementation of nurse bedside report. Patients and families shared that they felt more involved in their care and a closer rapport was established with the care team. <br/><br/>Recommendations: To sustain a culture of service excellence, strategies to impact patient satisfaction need to move from unspecific and vague with no real context to meaningful initiatives, validated by the customer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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