2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162522
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CSI: New @ York: Development of Forensic Evidence Collection Guidelines
Abstract:
CSI: New @ York: Development of Forensic Evidence Collection Guidelines
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:Eisert, Peter J., RN, BSN, SANE-A
P.I. Institution Name:York Hospital
Title:Staff Nurse NICU/ SAFE Team
Contact Address:1001 S. George Street, C/O NICU, York, PA, 17405, USA
Contact Telephone:717-851-2303
Co-Authors:Kelli Eldredge, RN, CCRN, MSN; Tami Harlaub, RN, CEN; Emily Huggins, RN, BSN, MHA, SAE-A, SANE-P; Geneva Keirn, RN, SANE-A; Heather Rozzi, MD, FAAEM, FACEP; Patti O'Brien, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P; Nicole Shue, RN, BS; Heidi Wilkerson, RN, BSN, ATCN; Linda C.
[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: Frequently, trauma patients are victims of crime. While medical care is the top priority, valuable forensic evidence can be easily lost in the trauma bay. This can have a significant impact for both the patient and society. This evidence-based practice (EBP) project sought to answer the practice question, "What are the best practices for forensic evidence collection (FEC) related to the trauma patient?" A trauma patient, as defined by this project, is someone who has suffered a gunshot wound, been stabbed, or severely assaulted.

Implementation: In a mid-Atlantic community teaching hospital, a multidisciplinary team was formed to apply the John Hopkins Nursing EBP Model to this patient care issue. An internal and external search for evidence was conducted. Internally, the search involved evaluating current hospital polices and interviewing emergency department staff. The external search involved a review of literature (ROL) as well as contacting existing hospital-based forensic programs, forensic nursing experts, and law enforcement officials.
The internal evaluation process revealed inconsistencies in FEC in the trauma bay. The lack of both forensic education and protocols threaten the recognition, collection, preservation of evidence, and chain of custody. Variations in practice can influence legal outcomes for patients. A ROL resulted in numerous expert opinion articles that asserted the need for forensic protocols, however, none of these provided fully developed guidelines. The literature also lacked research studies which examined FEC for non-sexual assault in emergency departments (ED). Therefore, to add strength to our practice recommendations, sexual assault studies were reviewed for information pertaining to the efficacy of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) in evidence collection.
Following a thorough examination of the evidence, the EBP team developed detailed recommendations for practice, which included specific guidelines for the collection, handling, and preservation of varying types of forensic evidence. Due to the evidentiary value of clothing and need for an improved chain of custody, implementation began with the goal of incorporating guidelines for the collection, preservation, and packaging of clothing, and an improved chain of custody form. Initial education efforts are focused on trauma nurses and staff directly responsible for collecting the patient's belongings. Forensic education is being incorporated into the emergency nurse core curriculum for new ED nurses and interns, and is under consideration for the trauma nurse core curriculum. Computer based education is being developed for ED staff.

Outcomes: Forensic guidelines developed through the EBP process are in the early stages of implementation. Outcomes will be measured by: effective use of the forensic kit developed to facilitate FEC, evaluation of chain of evidence forms, and ongoing feedback from the city forensic unit.

Recommendations:

1. Emergency Departments need well defined protocols for the collection, preservation, and packaging of forensic evidence, and maintenance of the chain of custody.
2. Basic forensic education and training is needed for Emergency Nurses annually, as part of new nurse orientation, and prior to forensic protocol implementation.

Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCSI: New @ York: Development of Forensic Evidence Collection Guidelinesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162522-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">CSI: New @ York: Development of Forensic Evidence Collection Guidelines</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Eisert, Peter J., RN, BSN, SANE-A</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">York Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Nurse NICU/ SAFE Team</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1001 S. George Street, C/O NICU, York, PA, 17405, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">717-851-2303</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">peisert@wellspan.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kelli Eldredge, RN, CCRN, MSN; Tami Harlaub, RN, CEN; Emily Huggins, RN, BSN, MHA, SAE-A, SANE-P; Geneva Keirn, RN, SANE-A; Heather Rozzi, MD, FAAEM, FACEP; Patti O'Brien, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P; Nicole Shue, RN, BS; Heidi Wilkerson, RN, BSN, ATCN; Linda C. </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: Frequently, trauma patients are victims of crime. While medical care is the top priority, valuable forensic evidence can be easily lost in the trauma bay. This can have a significant impact for both the patient and society. This evidence-based practice (EBP) project sought to answer the practice question, &quot;What are the best practices for forensic evidence collection (FEC) related to the trauma patient?&quot; A trauma patient, as defined by this project, is someone who has suffered a gunshot wound, been stabbed, or severely assaulted.<br/><br/>Implementation: In a mid-Atlantic community teaching hospital, a multidisciplinary team was formed to apply the John Hopkins Nursing EBP Model to this patient care issue. An internal and external search for evidence was conducted. Internally, the search involved evaluating current hospital polices and interviewing emergency department staff. The external search involved a review of literature (ROL) as well as contacting existing hospital-based forensic programs, forensic nursing experts, and law enforcement officials.<br/> The internal evaluation process revealed inconsistencies in FEC in the trauma bay. The lack of both forensic education and protocols threaten the recognition, collection, preservation of evidence, and chain of custody. Variations in practice can influence legal outcomes for patients. A ROL resulted in numerous expert opinion articles that asserted the need for forensic protocols, however, none of these provided fully developed guidelines. The literature also lacked research studies which examined FEC for non-sexual assault in emergency departments (ED). Therefore, to add strength to our practice recommendations, sexual assault studies were reviewed for information pertaining to the efficacy of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) in evidence collection.<br/> Following a thorough examination of the evidence, the EBP team developed detailed recommendations for practice, which included specific guidelines for the collection, handling, and preservation of varying types of forensic evidence. Due to the evidentiary value of clothing and need for an improved chain of custody, implementation began with the goal of incorporating guidelines for the collection, preservation, and packaging of clothing, and an improved chain of custody form. Initial education efforts are focused on trauma nurses and staff directly responsible for collecting the patient's belongings. Forensic education is being incorporated into the emergency nurse core curriculum for new ED nurses and interns, and is under consideration for the trauma nurse core curriculum. Computer based education is being developed for ED staff.<br/><br/>Outcomes: Forensic guidelines developed through the EBP process are in the early stages of implementation. Outcomes will be measured by: effective use of the forensic kit developed to facilitate FEC, evaluation of chain of evidence forms, and ongoing feedback from the city forensic unit. <br/><br/>Recommendations:<br/><br/>1. Emergency Departments need well defined protocols for the collection, preservation, and packaging of forensic evidence, and maintenance of the chain of custody.<br/>2. Basic forensic education and training is needed for Emergency Nurses annually, as part of new nurse orientation, and prior to forensic protocol implementation.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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