2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162526
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Orienting Float Pool Nursing Assistants to the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Orienting Float Pool Nursing Assistants to the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hauver, Jeni, RN, BSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Duke University Health System
Title:CN IV
Contact Address:4021 Candlewick Way, Durham, NC, 27704, USA
Contact Telephone:919-681-3478
[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: Due to staffing vacancies in the Emergency Department (ED) of a Level One Trauma Center in the mid-Atlantic region, float pool nursing assistants (NAs) are utilized in the ED to supplement staffing levels. The ED was requesting NA float pool staff every shift of the October/November schedule in 2007 without success. Float pool NAs did not feel comfortable working in the ED as the skill-set is much different and the pace faster and more chaotic than the hospital floors. ED staff had negative perceptions and minimal confidence in float pool NAs' abilities to work in the ED. Improved ED specific training was necessary to ensure a high level of care for ED patients by float pool NAs.

Implementation: A convenience sample of float pool NA's and ED staff (nurses and NAs) were surveyed to determine what content should be included in an orientation class. A three-hour class was developed based on survey results to orient NA IIs to common skills performed in the ED. Key aspects of the class included orientation to ED layout, patient flow and NA skills such as assisting with pelvic exams, inserting Foley catheters. NAs comfort level and knowledge were pre-surveyed prior to the intervention (class) and immediately after the intervention to determine effectiveness of the intervention using a Lichert Scale (1 = strongly agree and 5= strongly disagree).

Outcomes: The average lichert scale response for float pool NA IIs feeling they had an adequate orientation to the ED before the class was 3.6 and improved to 1.7 after the class. The average lichert scale response for float pool NA IIs feeling prepared to work in the ED was 3.2, this improved to 2.2 after the class. The average lichert scale response for float pool NA IIs feeling comfortable to work in the ED was 2.9 before the class, this improved to 2.25 after the class. An interesting outcome was that float pool NAs reported less comfort level with several skills after the class. This may be due to poor question format on the survey or NAs need to practice more hands on skills to increase competency. Several NAs who would not have considered the ED otherwise, worked in the ED after taking the class. ED staff responded more positively to float pool NAs and expressed satisfaction with their performance.

Recommendations: As a nation-wide use of float pool staff in hospitals continues to increase, the competency of these individuals in specialized areas like the ED is critical. Special training through a streamlined NA class improved NA staffing in the ED. The class should be offered every few months to continue to train and encourage more NAs to work in the ED. Hands on skill review and practice should be considered to target skills where low comfort levels were expressed post intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOrienting Float Pool Nursing Assistants to the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162526-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Orienting Float Pool Nursing Assistants to the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hauver, Jeni, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Duke University Health System</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">CN IV</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4021 Candlewick Way, Durham, NC, 27704, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">919-681-3478</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hauve001@mc.duke.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: Due to staffing vacancies in the Emergency Department (ED) of a Level One Trauma Center in the mid-Atlantic region, float pool nursing assistants (NAs) are utilized in the ED to supplement staffing levels. The ED was requesting NA float pool staff every shift of the October/November schedule in 2007 without success. Float pool NAs did not feel comfortable working in the ED as the skill-set is much different and the pace faster and more chaotic than the hospital floors. ED staff had negative perceptions and minimal confidence in float pool NAs' abilities to work in the ED. Improved ED specific training was necessary to ensure a high level of care for ED patients by float pool NAs. <br/><br/>Implementation: A convenience sample of float pool NA's and ED staff (nurses and NAs) were surveyed to determine what content should be included in an orientation class. A three-hour class was developed based on survey results to orient NA IIs to common skills performed in the ED. Key aspects of the class included orientation to ED layout, patient flow and NA skills such as assisting with pelvic exams, inserting Foley catheters. NAs comfort level and knowledge were pre-surveyed prior to the intervention (class) and immediately after the intervention to determine effectiveness of the intervention using a Lichert Scale (1 = strongly agree and 5= strongly disagree). <br/><br/>Outcomes: The average lichert scale response for float pool NA IIs feeling they had an adequate orientation to the ED before the class was 3.6 and improved to 1.7 after the class. The average lichert scale response for float pool NA IIs feeling prepared to work in the ED was 3.2, this improved to 2.2 after the class. The average lichert scale response for float pool NA IIs feeling comfortable to work in the ED was 2.9 before the class, this improved to 2.25 after the class. An interesting outcome was that float pool NAs reported less comfort level with several skills after the class. This may be due to poor question format on the survey or NAs need to practice more hands on skills to increase competency. Several NAs who would not have considered the ED otherwise, worked in the ED after taking the class. ED staff responded more positively to float pool NAs and expressed satisfaction with their performance.<br/><br/>Recommendations: As a nation-wide use of float pool staff in hospitals continues to increase, the competency of these individuals in specialized areas like the ED is critical. Special training through a streamlined NA class improved NA staffing in the ED. The class should be offered every few months to continue to train and encourage more NAs to work in the ED. Hands on skill review and practice should be considered to target skills where low comfort levels were expressed post intervention.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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