Effectiveness of Educational Orientation Interventions in Preparing ED Staff for Integration and Relocation to a New Facility

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162528
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effectiveness of Educational Orientation Interventions in Preparing ED Staff for Integration and Relocation to a New Facility
Abstract:
Effectiveness of Educational Orientation Interventions in Preparing ED Staff for Integration and Relocation to a New Facility
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:Keddington, Roger, APRN, MSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Intermountain Medical Center
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist, Emergency Department
Contact Address:5121 S. Cottonwood Street, Murray, UT, 84157, USA
Contact Telephone:801-507-6666
Co-Authors:Suzanne Day, RN, BSN, MA; Jolene Fox, RN; Rachelle Rhodes, RN, BSN
[Annual Conference Research Poster]
Purpose: Emergency Department (ED) staffs from a community hospital and an urban Level One Adult Trauma Center were integrated and relocated to a new tertiary care Level One Trauma Center. The purpose of the study was to measure how well educational integration and relocation interventions prepared the staff.

Design: Survey/Descriptive/Quasi-experimental

Setting: ED staffs from a Trauma Center and Community Hospital in the western US.

Sample: ED staff members from each facility who voluntarily completed a survey.

Methodology: Prior to the move, five educational orientation interventions were designed by management and educators. The ED staffs at both facilities were expected to attend the following orientation interventions: New Facility Orientation (staff visited and became familiar with department locations within the new facility); New ED Orientation (staff visited the new ED and became familiar with the floor plan, patient flow, and supplies locations); Didactic Trauma Class (staff completed a clinical trauma study module with testing); Facility Cross Training (giving staff from both facilities the opportunity to work with a staff partner in the other ED); Socialization Experiences (multiple opportunities were provided for staff introduction and socialization). Three months following integration and relocation to a new facility an Education and Orientation Interventions survey was distributed to ED staff. The orientation interventions listed above were rated by survey respondents from 1 (not effective) through 5 (extremely effective). Study group comparisons were made using two-sided Wilcoxon Test (mean rates ± standard deviations are shown).

Results: Twenty-one Trauma Center staff and 35 Community Hospital staff responded to the survey. Staff rating comparisons by facility were: New Facility Orientation (Trauma Center 3.5±1.2, Community Hospital 3.2±1.2, p=0.44), New ED Orientation (Trauma Center 3.5±1.2, Community Hospital 3.6±1.1, p=0.80), Didactic Trauma Class (Trauma Center 3.3±1.3, Community Hospital 3.7±1.4 p=0.31), Facility Cross Training (Trauma Center 3.1±1.4, Community Hospital 3.3±1.3, p=0.62), and Socialization Experiences (Trauma Center 2.2±1.1, Community Hospital 2.2±1.2, p=0.94. There were no statistical differences between the Trauma Center and the Community Hospital ratings. However, Trauma Center staff rated orientation to the new facility and Emergency Department as the most effective interventions. The Community Hospital staff rated the didactic trauma orientation intervention most effective with the orientation to the new facility second most effective. Both study groups rated socialization experiences as least effective.

Conclusions: Overall, clinical interventions were deemed more effective than socialization. Prior to any integration of staff from different cultures, ED managers and educators must develop relevant education and orientation strategies. Determining which interventions will be most effective is important and can result in better utilization of time and therefore cost savings. Hospital mergers are making staff integration more common. Further studies are needed to evaluate educational interventions designed for staff integration.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffectiveness of Educational Orientation Interventions in Preparing ED Staff for Integration and Relocation to a New Facilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162528-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effectiveness of Educational Orientation Interventions in Preparing ED Staff for Integration and Relocation to a New Facility</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keddington, Roger, APRN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Intermountain Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist, Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5121 S. Cottonwood Street, Murray, UT, 84157, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-507-6666</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">roger.keddington@imail.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Suzanne Day, RN, BSN, MA; Jolene Fox, RN; Rachelle Rhodes, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Annual Conference Research Poster] <br/>Purpose: Emergency Department (ED) staffs from a community hospital and an urban Level One Adult Trauma Center were integrated and relocated to a new tertiary care Level One Trauma Center. The purpose of the study was to measure how well educational integration and relocation interventions prepared the staff.<br/><br/>Design: Survey/Descriptive/Quasi-experimental<br/><br/>Setting: ED staffs from a Trauma Center and Community Hospital in the western US. <br/><br/>Sample: ED staff members from each facility who voluntarily completed a survey.<br/><br/>Methodology: Prior to the move, five educational orientation interventions were designed by management and educators. The ED staffs at both facilities were expected to attend the following orientation interventions: New Facility Orientation (staff visited and became familiar with department locations within the new facility); New ED Orientation (staff visited the new ED and became familiar with the floor plan, patient flow, and supplies locations); Didactic Trauma Class (staff completed a clinical trauma study module with testing); Facility Cross Training (giving staff from both facilities the opportunity to work with a staff partner in the other ED); Socialization Experiences (multiple opportunities were provided for staff introduction and socialization). Three months following integration and relocation to a new facility an Education and Orientation Interventions survey was distributed to ED staff. The orientation interventions listed above were rated by survey respondents from 1 (not effective) through 5 (extremely effective). Study group comparisons were made using two-sided Wilcoxon Test (mean rates &plusmn; standard deviations are shown).<br/><br/>Results: Twenty-one Trauma Center staff and 35 Community Hospital staff responded to the survey. Staff rating comparisons by facility were: New Facility Orientation (Trauma Center 3.5&plusmn;1.2, Community Hospital 3.2&plusmn;1.2, p=0.44), New ED Orientation (Trauma Center 3.5&plusmn;1.2, Community Hospital 3.6&plusmn;1.1, p=0.80), Didactic Trauma Class (Trauma Center 3.3&plusmn;1.3, Community Hospital 3.7&plusmn;1.4 p=0.31), Facility Cross Training (Trauma Center 3.1&plusmn;1.4, Community Hospital 3.3&plusmn;1.3, p=0.62), and Socialization Experiences (Trauma Center 2.2&plusmn;1.1, Community Hospital 2.2&plusmn;1.2, p=0.94. There were no statistical differences between the Trauma Center and the Community Hospital ratings. However, Trauma Center staff rated orientation to the new facility and Emergency Department as the most effective interventions. The Community Hospital staff rated the didactic trauma orientation intervention most effective with the orientation to the new facility second most effective. Both study groups rated socialization experiences as least effective. <br/><br/>Conclusions: Overall, clinical interventions were deemed more effective than socialization. Prior to any integration of staff from different cultures, ED managers and educators must develop relevant education and orientation strategies. Determining which interventions will be most effective is important and can result in better utilization of time and therefore cost savings. Hospital mergers are making staff integration more common. Further studies are needed to evaluate educational interventions designed for staff integration. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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