2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162533
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Actualizing Homeland Security Goals in the ED Through Hazmat Training
Abstract:
Actualizing Homeland Security Goals in the ED Through Hazmat Training
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:Mandelin, Charles, RN, BSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Duke University Hospital
Title:Emergency Department Unit Educator
Contact Address:DUMC 3869, Durham, NC, 27710, USA
Co-Authors:Louise Rogers, RN, BSN; James Pirtle, RN, NREMT-P; Ann White, RN, MSN, CCNS, CEN
[Annual Conference] Clinical topic: Emergency Department staff are among the first called into action during a response to disasters. While most mass casualty incidents involve "typical" emergency department patients who sustain trauma and little else, disasters involving chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive hazards (CBRNE) require a level of expertise not common in nursing, such as decontamination with advanced personal protective measures and nontraditional treatment modalities. The ED nurse is placed in a new role of protecting the staff, the facility, and the rest of the patient population from the contaminant by ensuring the incoming patient is properly decontaminated to allow for medical treatment if necessary, representing a paradigm shift by focusing on disaster management instead of individual patient care. This tertiary care facility recognized their leadership position in the community by taking the lead on creating a comprehensive approach to disaster management by concentrating on department preparation and staff training.

Implementation: In 2007 five staff nurses attended the US Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency Center for Domestic Preparedness course on Hospital Emergency Response Training for Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) through a Department of Homeland Security Grant. This three day course provides medical operation guidance to hospitals to provide a safe and effective emergency medical response to a mass casualty incident with the specific goal being to develop a core response team of experts who could lead the effort during an actual disaster, and who could train further staff to respond to a disaster. This training teaches the use of appropriate personal protective equipment, decontamination, "field" triage, the essential knowledge of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high yield explosive (CBRNE) medical evaluation and treatment, and the integration of community and agency incident command with hospital incident command.

Outcomes: Since 2007, this core team has solidified this training and has completed 10 training sessions and one mock disaster. The number of trained staff who are ready able to respond to a MCI requiring decontamination has increased from 5% to 40% as the initial training has been incorporated into ED nurse orientation. The mock disaster highlighted the need for this program, the need for continued practice of the techniques, and continual awareness of threats and hazards facing the post "9/11" ED. Due to attrition, at present three emergency nurses continue to effectively manage the program to meet the needs of 105 FTEs.

Recommendations: Based on this experience, an ED-based training program for hospital emergency response to a MCI is practical, pragmatic, and easy to maintain with as little as three nurses per 100 staff nurses. The Hospital Emergency Response Training for MCI is an excellent foundation. Future goals aside from maintenance of continued staff nurse training is to implement scenario based drills, conduct more mock disasters, and continue CBRNE education for the ED staff.

Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleActualizing Homeland Security Goals in the ED Through Hazmat Trainingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162533-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Actualizing Homeland Security Goals in the ED Through Hazmat Training</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mandelin, Charles, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Duke University Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Emergency Department Unit Educator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">DUMC 3869, Durham, NC, 27710, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Louise Rogers, RN, BSN; James Pirtle, RN, NREMT-P; Ann White, RN, MSN, CCNS, CEN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Annual Conference] Clinical topic: Emergency Department staff are among the first called into action during a response to disasters. While most mass casualty incidents involve &quot;typical&quot; emergency department patients who sustain trauma and little else, disasters involving chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive hazards (CBRNE) require a level of expertise not common in nursing, such as decontamination with advanced personal protective measures and nontraditional treatment modalities. The ED nurse is placed in a new role of protecting the staff, the facility, and the rest of the patient population from the contaminant by ensuring the incoming patient is properly decontaminated to allow for medical treatment if necessary, representing a paradigm shift by focusing on disaster management instead of individual patient care. This tertiary care facility recognized their leadership position in the community by taking the lead on creating a comprehensive approach to disaster management by concentrating on department preparation and staff training. <br/><br/>Implementation: In 2007 five staff nurses attended the US Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency Center for Domestic Preparedness course on Hospital Emergency Response Training for Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) through a Department of Homeland Security Grant. This three day course provides medical operation guidance to hospitals to provide a safe and effective emergency medical response to a mass casualty incident with the specific goal being to develop a core response team of experts who could lead the effort during an actual disaster, and who could train further staff to respond to a disaster. This training teaches the use of appropriate personal protective equipment, decontamination, &quot;field&quot; triage, the essential knowledge of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high yield explosive (CBRNE) medical evaluation and treatment, and the integration of community and agency incident command with hospital incident command. <br/><br/>Outcomes: Since 2007, this core team has solidified this training and has completed 10 training sessions and one mock disaster. The number of trained staff who are ready able to respond to a MCI requiring decontamination has increased from 5% to 40% as the initial training has been incorporated into ED nurse orientation. The mock disaster highlighted the need for this program, the need for continued practice of the techniques, and continual awareness of threats and hazards facing the post &quot;9/11&quot; ED. Due to attrition, at present three emergency nurses continue to effectively manage the program to meet the needs of 105 FTEs. <br/><br/>Recommendations: Based on this experience, an ED-based training program for hospital emergency response to a MCI is practical, pragmatic, and easy to maintain with as little as three nurses per 100 staff nurses. The Hospital Emergency Response Training for MCI is an excellent foundation. Future goals aside from maintenance of continued staff nurse training is to implement scenario based drills, conduct more mock disasters, and continue CBRNE education for the ED staff. <br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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