2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162539
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Healthcare Provider Evaluation of Family Presence During Resuscitation
Abstract:
Healthcare Provider Evaluation of Family Presence During Resuscitation
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:Oman, Kathleen S., RN, PhD, CEN, FAEN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Hospital
Title:Research Nurse Scientist
Contact Address:12401 E. 17th Ave., Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Contact Telephone:720-848-6656
Co-Authors:Christine Duran, RN, DNP, ACNS-BC
[Annual Conference Research Poster]
Purpose: The benefits of family presence (FP) during resuscitation are well documented in the literature and it is becoming an accepted practice in many healthcare settings. There is sufficient evidence about healthcare provider's (HCP) and families' attitudes and beliefs about FP and little about the actual outcomes after family witnessed resuscitation. The holistic framework, one that preserves wholeness, dignity, and integrity of the family unit, guided this study.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate FP at resuscitations. The specific aims were to:

1. Determine the frequency that family members are present during resuscitations, and
2. Examine the health care providers' experiences with family presence during resuscitations. .

Design: A descriptive survey design was used.

Setting: Data were collected for a 12 month period from April 2007 - May 2008 at an academic medical center in the western U.S.

Sample: There were 106 codes during the study period. Family presence was documented on 31 (29%) records; in 24 (23%) records the family section of the form was incomplete. There were 174 healthcare providers who were listed on the code records, and 40 names (23%) were illegible or incomplete. The convenience sample of 134 HCPs were invited to complete the survey and 65 (49%) responded. Fifty five percent were RNs, 12% were resident/interns, respiratory therapists, or other (hospital managers and pulmonary fellows), and 8% were attending physicians.

Methodology: In-patient code records were reviewed to determine when family members were present and to identify the healthcare providers involved in the code. Emergency Department code records did not have a place to document family presence and were not included. An email invitation was sent to the providers inviting them to complete an electronic (Zoomerang) survey consisting of 7 likert scaled questions, including the opportunity to add narrative comments.

Results: Respondents indicated that family members were able to emotionally tolerate the code situation (59%), did not interfere with the care being provided to the patient (88%). In addition, team communication was not negatively affected (88%). Seventy percent agreed or strongly agreed that the family member benefited by being present during the code; benefit to the patient, as determined by the HCPs, was evenly split with 50% stating no benefit and 50% indicating positive benefit. A family facilitator was present at 70% of the codes and it was usually a RN (41%), chaplain (17%), nurse hospital manager (15%), physician (9%), social worker (4%), certified nursing assistant (2%), or a combination of people (11%). Thirty narrative comments were summarized to reflect benefits and difficulties of having families present.

Conclusions: These study findings demonstrate that having families present during codes does not negatively impact patient care, is perceived to benefit family members and that a dedicated family facilitator is an integral part of the process. These findings are important to emergency nurses involved in implementing family presence in the emergency department. Planning for staff and family support and education is necessary to effectively implement a FP guideline.


Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealthcare Provider Evaluation of Family Presence During Resuscitationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162539-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Healthcare Provider Evaluation of Family Presence During Resuscitation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Oman, Kathleen S., RN, PhD, CEN, FAEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Nurse Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">12401 E. 17th Ave., Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">720-848-6656</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kathy.oman@uch.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Christine Duran, RN, DNP, ACNS-BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Annual Conference Research Poster] <br/>Purpose: The benefits of family presence (FP) during resuscitation are well documented in the literature and it is becoming an accepted practice in many healthcare settings. There is sufficient evidence about healthcare provider's (HCP) and families' attitudes and beliefs about FP and little about the actual outcomes after family witnessed resuscitation. The holistic framework, one that preserves wholeness, dignity, and integrity of the family unit, guided this study. <br/>The purpose of this study was to evaluate FP at resuscitations. The specific aims were to:<br/><br/>1. Determine the frequency that family members are present during resuscitations, and<br/>2. Examine the health care providers' experiences with family presence during resuscitations. . <br/><br/>Design: A descriptive survey design was used. <br/><br/>Setting: Data were collected for a 12 month period from April 2007 - May 2008 at an academic medical center in the western U.S. <br/><br/>Sample: There were 106 codes during the study period. Family presence was documented on 31 (29%) records; in 24 (23%) records the family section of the form was incomplete. There were 174 healthcare providers who were listed on the code records, and 40 names (23%) were illegible or incomplete. The convenience sample of 134 HCPs were invited to complete the survey and 65 (49%) responded. Fifty five percent were RNs, 12% were resident/interns, respiratory therapists, or other (hospital managers and pulmonary fellows), and 8% were attending physicians. <br/><br/>Methodology: In-patient code records were reviewed to determine when family members were present and to identify the healthcare providers involved in the code. Emergency Department code records did not have a place to document family presence and were not included. An email invitation was sent to the providers inviting them to complete an electronic (Zoomerang) survey consisting of 7 likert scaled questions, including the opportunity to add narrative comments.<br/><br/>Results: Respondents indicated that family members were able to emotionally tolerate the code situation (59%), did not interfere with the care being provided to the patient (88%). In addition, team communication was not negatively affected (88%). Seventy percent agreed or strongly agreed that the family member benefited by being present during the code; benefit to the patient, as determined by the HCPs, was evenly split with 50% stating no benefit and 50% indicating positive benefit. A family facilitator was present at 70% of the codes and it was usually a RN (41%), chaplain (17%), nurse hospital manager (15%), physician (9%), social worker (4%), certified nursing assistant (2%), or a combination of people (11%). Thirty narrative comments were summarized to reflect benefits and difficulties of having families present. <br/><br/>Conclusions: These study findings demonstrate that having families present during codes does not negatively impact patient care, is perceived to benefit family members and that a dedicated family facilitator is an integral part of the process. These findings are important to emergency nurses involved in implementing family presence in the emergency department. Planning for staff and family support and education is necessary to effectively implement a FP guideline. <br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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