2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162543
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Purple Alert
Abstract:
Purple Alert
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:Schaeffer, Ann, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins Hospital
Title:RN, Senior Clinical Nurse
Contact Address:601 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21287-1454, USA
Contact Telephone:410-955-5680
[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: Our clinical topic is a Purple Alert Policy which is a decompression plan accessible by the Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) when it is above capacity to safely manage patients. Our Purple Alert policy is important because in the event of high volume or acuity it provides the PED with the hospital wide support and resources needed during unsafe conditions. This topic is relevant to Emergency Departments across the country where the influx of patients is never scheduled or expected.

Implementation: The Nursing and Physician team identified this as a safety issue and constructed a proposed plan. The plan consisted of admissions within 30 minutes of activation, utilization of urgent care resources, no sedations, and delay or cancellation of transfers. The plan was reviewed by a multidisciplinary hospital team. Upon approval, it was added to the General Pediatric Policies and Procedures web site for all units to access. It was first implemented 8/27/07. The attending physician and charge nurse from the PED and charge nurses from each inpatient unit fill out an evaluation tool after each Purple Alert. Debriefing occurred after each Purple Alert for the first year. The 3 major obstacles identified were: (1) knowledge deficit (2) urgency in admitting patients and (3) needed support from Environmental and Patient Transport Services.
This topic was discussed in a Morbidity and Mortality session to further educate the Residents and Nurse Managers in order to clarify the intent, usage and expectations of Purple Alert. Yearly staff education in our Emergency Department was initiated also.
Purple Alert continues to be evaluated to determine its effectiveness in maximizing patient care delivery.

Outcomes: Since Purple Alert started, we have initiated it 16 times. The number has doubled this past year. All have been initiated between the hours of 13:30 and 03:00. The average time we are on Purple Alert is 5 hours. The steady increase in Purple Alerts indicates the importance of this policy and the continual need to evaluate the processes prior to and during Purple Alert.

Recommendations: Since Emergency Rooms throughout the country have similar issues with space and influx of patient volume and/or acuity at any given time, there has to be a safety net to decompress. Other than an immediate on call staff and more rooms and equipment, there is no other way to continue care at an optimum standard. Initiating Purple Alert offers relief within 30 minutes, allowing patients to receive the care they deserve.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePurple Alerten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162543-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Purple Alert</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schaeffer, Ann, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN, Senior Clinical Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">601 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21287-1454, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">410-955-5680</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">anns1234@comcast.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: Our clinical topic is a Purple Alert Policy which is a decompression plan accessible by the Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) when it is above capacity to safely manage patients. Our Purple Alert policy is important because in the event of high volume or acuity it provides the PED with the hospital wide support and resources needed during unsafe conditions. This topic is relevant to Emergency Departments across the country where the influx of patients is never scheduled or expected. <br/><br/>Implementation: The Nursing and Physician team identified this as a safety issue and constructed a proposed plan. The plan consisted of admissions within 30 minutes of activation, utilization of urgent care resources, no sedations, and delay or cancellation of transfers. The plan was reviewed by a multidisciplinary hospital team. Upon approval, it was added to the General Pediatric Policies and Procedures web site for all units to access. It was first implemented 8/27/07. The attending physician and charge nurse from the PED and charge nurses from each inpatient unit fill out an evaluation tool after each Purple Alert. Debriefing occurred after each Purple Alert for the first year. The 3 major obstacles identified were: (1) knowledge deficit (2) urgency in admitting patients and (3) needed support from Environmental and Patient Transport Services. <br/>This topic was discussed in a Morbidity and Mortality session to further educate the Residents and Nurse Managers in order to clarify the intent, usage and expectations of Purple Alert. Yearly staff education in our Emergency Department was initiated also. <br/>Purple Alert continues to be evaluated to determine its effectiveness in maximizing patient care delivery. <br/><br/>Outcomes: Since Purple Alert started, we have initiated it 16 times. The number has doubled this past year. All have been initiated between the hours of 13:30 and 03:00. The average time we are on Purple Alert is 5 hours. The steady increase in Purple Alerts indicates the importance of this policy and the continual need to evaluate the processes prior to and during Purple Alert. <br/><br/>Recommendations: Since Emergency Rooms throughout the country have similar issues with space and influx of patient volume and/or acuity at any given time, there has to be a safety net to decompress. Other than an immediate on call staff and more rooms and equipment, there is no other way to continue care at an optimum standard. Initiating Purple Alert offers relief within 30 minutes, allowing patients to receive the care they deserve. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:29:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:29:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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