2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162547
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Blocks: Beginning with an End in Mind
Abstract:
Building Blocks: Beginning with an End in Mind
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:Smith, Cheryl, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins Hospital
Title:NC3
Contact Address:600 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA
Contact Telephone:410-955-5680
[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: Resulting from the inability to recruit experienced pediatric emergency nurses and the unwillingness to hire new graduate nurses, our pediatric emergency department was continuously short staffed. We identified the need for an orientation program that would allow for the successful transition of new graduate nurses into the department. The purpose of this project is to increase nurse staffing ratios and improve nurse retention on our unit.

Implementation: The project was addressed by first researching nursing literature on orientation programs for emergency departments. An informal survey of pediatric hospitals in the Mid-Atlantic Region was performed to learn which hospitals hired new graduate nurses for their pediatric emergency departments. The educators of these hospitals were then contacted to obtain information on their respective orientation programs. Our department purchased the orientation program offered by the ENA, Orientation to Emergency Nursing: Concepts, Competencies, and Critical Thinking. In collaboration with the unit's Staff Development Committee, the format and classes were decided upon incorporating theory and content from the ENA's program, tailoring it to meet the needs of our unit. The following tools were also developed for use in orientation; a criteria checklist for the preceptor role, a preceptor class, preceptor and orientee manuals, and an orientation pathway. There are weekly, mid-orientation, and end of orientation forms used during the process. During orientation there are weekly meetings with the orientees for discussing their experiences, concerns, or frustrations in a safe setting. The orientation program evaluation process is on-going.

Outcomes: To date, fifteen nurses have participated in the new grad orientation program. One nurse did not successfully complete the program. Another nurse left the unit after a year due to health reasons. 29 months after initiation of the program, we have a 92% retention rate as 13/14 participants completing the program continue to work in our pediatric emergency department. They currently account for 1/3 of our nursing staff. We continue to use this program for hiring new graduate nurses.
This program has been very successful in meeting its goals. The senior staff is satisfied with the addition of the new graduates. These new nurses are extremely engaged employees, wonderful patient advocates, and great team players. They participate in unit committees and in our professional practice model. The more "senior" of the new grads are now stepping into the roles of triage, trauma, and charge nurse. To date, there have been no safety issues involving this group of nurses.

Recommendations: This topic is relevant for new graduate nurses because it presents options and can help them choose an institution that is vested in their success. Recommended areas for research using this topic include safety, retention, staffing, and education. In our practice, the shortage of experienced nurses forced us to reconsider the qualifications necessary to work in a pediatric emergency department. Emergency departments can use this topic to help them decide the feasibility of devising and implementing a new graduate program in their departments.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Blocks: Beginning with an End in Minden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162547-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Building Blocks: Beginning with an End in Mind</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Cheryl, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">NC3</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">600 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">410-955-5680</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">csmith28@jhmi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: Resulting from the inability to recruit experienced pediatric emergency nurses and the unwillingness to hire new graduate nurses, our pediatric emergency department was continuously short staffed. We identified the need for an orientation program that would allow for the successful transition of new graduate nurses into the department. The purpose of this project is to increase nurse staffing ratios and improve nurse retention on our unit.<br/><br/>Implementation: The project was addressed by first researching nursing literature on orientation programs for emergency departments. An informal survey of pediatric hospitals in the Mid-Atlantic Region was performed to learn which hospitals hired new graduate nurses for their pediatric emergency departments. The educators of these hospitals were then contacted to obtain information on their respective orientation programs. Our department purchased the orientation program offered by the ENA, Orientation to Emergency Nursing: Concepts, Competencies, and Critical Thinking. In collaboration with the unit's Staff Development Committee, the format and classes were decided upon incorporating theory and content from the ENA's program, tailoring it to meet the needs of our unit. The following tools were also developed for use in orientation; a criteria checklist for the preceptor role, a preceptor class, preceptor and orientee manuals, and an orientation pathway. There are weekly, mid-orientation, and end of orientation forms used during the process. During orientation there are weekly meetings with the orientees for discussing their experiences, concerns, or frustrations in a safe setting. The orientation program evaluation process is on-going.<br/><br/>Outcomes: To date, fifteen nurses have participated in the new grad orientation program. One nurse did not successfully complete the program. Another nurse left the unit after a year due to health reasons. 29 months after initiation of the program, we have a 92% retention rate as 13/14 participants completing the program continue to work in our pediatric emergency department. They currently account for 1/3 of our nursing staff. We continue to use this program for hiring new graduate nurses.<br/> This program has been very successful in meeting its goals. The senior staff is satisfied with the addition of the new graduates. These new nurses are extremely engaged employees, wonderful patient advocates, and great team players. They participate in unit committees and in our professional practice model. The more &quot;senior&quot; of the new grads are now stepping into the roles of triage, trauma, and charge nurse. To date, there have been no safety issues involving this group of nurses.<br/><br/>Recommendations: This topic is relevant for new graduate nurses because it presents options and can help them choose an institution that is vested in their success. Recommended areas for research using this topic include safety, retention, staffing, and education. In our practice, the shortage of experienced nurses forced us to reconsider the qualifications necessary to work in a pediatric emergency department. Emergency departments can use this topic to help them decide the feasibility of devising and implementing a new graduate program in their departments.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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