2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162555
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Show Me the Evidence: Pushing Out Nursing Research
Abstract:
Show Me the Evidence: Pushing Out Nursing Research
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2009
Author:Winokur, Elizabeth, RN, MSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:St. Joseph Hospital
Title:Clinical Educator, Emergency Services
Contact Address:1101 W. Stewart Drive, Orange, CA, 92864, USA
Contact Telephone:714-771-8251
[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: Evidence demonstrates that translating clinically important research into nursing practice can be significantly delayed. In part, delays can be traced to the bedside RN's difficulty accessing and evaluating relevant research. In an effort to address these issues, the research council developed a process to disseminate relevant research findings and increase proficiency in appraising research findings.

Implementation: Nursing Research council members wanted to bring applicable nursing research to bedside RNs. Among suggested methods was a department-specific, reusable poster with a format mirroring nursing research articles. An emergency department staff RN read and analyzed a research article (Parental Holding and positioning to decrease IV distress in young children: A randomized controlled trial) and presented it as a sample to the council. Headings included research questions, aims, hypothesis, background, methods, results, and implications for practice. This "prototype" poster was approved. Subsequent to approval of new posters, members representing specific nursing areas bring research articles of interest to working meetings. The doctorally prepared research facilitator, research chair, research assistant, and the librarian assist committee members in preparing department-specific posters. Prior to the first poster role-out in the emergency department, a quality improvement survey targeted at the ED RNs' understanding of the research process was distributed; forty-five anonymous surveys were returned. Posters were placed in department staff lounges and presented at change of shift or staff meetings by department research council representatives, and were displayed for 2-3 months. The same survey (time 2) was given to the ED RNs prior to distribution of the second poster to determine any change in comprehension of the nursing research process. Additional items were added to assess whether RNs had read the poster or attempted a change in practice based on article findings. The survey will be redistributed in the spring before the third poster is placed in the department.

Outcomes: Council members reported staff RN feedback about the posters. Most revolved around poster content. Staff responses ranged from extremely supportive to dismissive. All research council members reported discussion about the topics within their departments. Three departments reported department wide changes in policy and practice. Initial questionnaire results (N = 45) indicated that ED RNs scored 4.3 out of 6 (SD 1.45). The most significant knowledge deficits were related to the meaning of research questions and an understanding of the content of specific sections of a research article. The second questionnaire indicated that knowledge of the research process had increased. Most staff had read the poster; 78% stated that they had attempted the practice change.

Recommendations: The process of disseminating nursing research and facilitating its incorporation into practice not easy given the complexities of health care. Show Me the Evidence posters bring relevant research to ED nursing staff in an easily understandable format. Additionally, poster format provides an opportunity for ED RNs to be exposed to and gain familiarity with reading and evaluating research articles. Finally, this educational strategy allows varied clinical topics to be displayed over time.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleShow Me the Evidence: Pushing Out Nursing Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162555-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Show Me the Evidence: Pushing Out Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winokur, Elizabeth, RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Joseph Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Educator, Emergency Services</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1101 W. Stewart Drive, Orange, CA, 92864, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">714-771-8251</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">beth.winokur@stjoe.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Annual Conference] Clinical Topic: Evidence demonstrates that translating clinically important research into nursing practice can be significantly delayed. In part, delays can be traced to the bedside RN's difficulty accessing and evaluating relevant research. In an effort to address these issues, the research council developed a process to disseminate relevant research findings and increase proficiency in appraising research findings.<br/> <br/>Implementation: Nursing Research council members wanted to bring applicable nursing research to bedside RNs. Among suggested methods was a department-specific, reusable poster with a format mirroring nursing research articles. An emergency department staff RN read and analyzed a research article (Parental Holding and positioning to decrease IV distress in young children: A randomized controlled trial) and presented it as a sample to the council. Headings included research questions, aims, hypothesis, background, methods, results, and implications for practice. This &quot;prototype&quot; poster was approved. Subsequent to approval of new posters, members representing specific nursing areas bring research articles of interest to working meetings. The doctorally prepared research facilitator, research chair, research assistant, and the librarian assist committee members in preparing department-specific posters. Prior to the first poster role-out in the emergency department, a quality improvement survey targeted at the ED RNs' understanding of the research process was distributed; forty-five anonymous surveys were returned. Posters were placed in department staff lounges and presented at change of shift or staff meetings by department research council representatives, and were displayed for 2-3 months. The same survey (time 2) was given to the ED RNs prior to distribution of the second poster to determine any change in comprehension of the nursing research process. Additional items were added to assess whether RNs had read the poster or attempted a change in practice based on article findings. The survey will be redistributed in the spring before the third poster is placed in the department.<br/><br/>Outcomes: Council members reported staff RN feedback about the posters. Most revolved around poster content. Staff responses ranged from extremely supportive to dismissive. All research council members reported discussion about the topics within their departments. Three departments reported department wide changes in policy and practice. Initial questionnaire results (N = 45) indicated that ED RNs scored 4.3 out of 6 (SD 1.45). The most significant knowledge deficits were related to the meaning of research questions and an understanding of the content of specific sections of a research article. The second questionnaire indicated that knowledge of the research process had increased. Most staff had read the poster; 78% stated that they had attempted the practice change.<br/><br/>Recommendations: The process of disseminating nursing research and facilitating its incorporation into practice not easy given the complexities of health care. Show Me the Evidence posters bring relevant research to ED nursing staff in an easily understandable format. Additionally, poster format provides an opportunity for ED RNs to be exposed to and gain familiarity with reading and evaluating research articles. Finally, this educational strategy allows varied clinical topics to be displayed over time.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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