2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162574
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Impacting Emergency Department Triage Duration
Abstract:
Factors Impacting Emergency Department Triage Duration
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Miller, Karen F., RN, MPA, CCRC
P.I. Institution Name:Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Title: Director, Clinical Research Operations
Contact Address:1313 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN, 37064, USA
Contact Telephone:615-936-4790
Co-Authors:Cathy A. Jenkins, MS; Jin H. Han, MD;Brent Lemonds, RN, MS, EMT-P, FACHE; Diane Dubinski, RN; Dominik Aronsky, MD, PhD; Alan B. Storrow, MD
Leadership Conference - Research Abstract: Factors Impacting Emergency Department Triage Duration

Purpose: Rapid and efficient triage is vital to a high performance emergency department (ED). Few studies have evaluated how patient or system factors affect the time it takes to perform emergency triage. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that impact ED triage duration.

Design: This was a retrospective cohort study using a consecutive sample of adult ED triage events over a 4 year period.

Setting: Triage events were conducted in an urban, academic, level one trauma, tertiary care referral center with an adult ED that evaluates over 50,000 patients annually.

Subjects/Participants: Adult subjects who presented to the ED between 09/01/2005 to 05/31/2009 for emergency care and had their triage coordinated by an emergency nurse were included in the study.

Methods: Data were electronically extracted from triage and ED records. Associations of triage duration with Emergency Severity Index (ESI), shift, age, gender, patient pain level, and ED occupancy were tested using univariate analyses (Pearson's correlation, Wilcoxon rank sum test, or Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test, as appropriate) and multivariable linear regression with all results reported using a p-value of less than 0.05 to determine significance. Linear regression was also used to assess the relationship of nurse experience, as measured by the number of triages coordinated by each emergency nurse, with each nurse's average triage duration.

Results/outcomes: There were 187,170 triage events conducted by 336 different triage nurses. The overall median triage duration was 4.2 minutes (IQR=3.0, 5.9). Median patient age was 39.8 (IQR=27.2, 53.7) and 45% were male. Shorter triage duration was significantly associated with day shift, higher ESI, lower patient age, male gender, and higher patient pain level (all p<0.001) both in univariate and multivariable analyses. When assessing nurse experience, a 100% increase in the number of triages conducted by the emergency nurse yielded a 9% decrease in a nurse's average triage duration on average.

Implications: The study demonstrates that patient, system, and triage nurse factors significantly impact ED triage duration. This information may be useful in identifying methods to define nurse triage education, reduce triage duration, and improve ED throughput.

Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Impacting Emergency Department Triage Durationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162574-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Impacting Emergency Department Triage Duration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Karen F., RN, MPA, CCRC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vanderbilt University Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> Director, Clinical Research Operations</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1313 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN, 37064, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">615-936-4790</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karen.f.miller@vanderbilt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cathy A. Jenkins, MS; Jin H. Han, MD;Brent Lemonds, RN, MS, EMT-P, FACHE; Diane Dubinski, RN; Dominik Aronsky, MD, PhD; Alan B. Storrow, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Leadership Conference - Research Abstract: Factors Impacting Emergency Department Triage Duration<br/><br/>Purpose: Rapid and efficient triage is vital to a high performance emergency department (ED). Few studies have evaluated how patient or system factors affect the time it takes to perform emergency triage. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that impact ED triage duration. <br/><br/>Design: This was a retrospective cohort study using a consecutive sample of adult ED triage events over a 4 year period. <br/><br/>Setting: Triage events were conducted in an urban, academic, level one trauma, tertiary care referral center with an adult ED that evaluates over 50,000 patients annually.<br/><br/>Subjects/Participants: Adult subjects who presented to the ED between 09/01/2005 to 05/31/2009 for emergency care and had their triage coordinated by an emergency nurse were included in the study. <br/><br/>Methods: Data were electronically extracted from triage and ED records. Associations of triage duration with Emergency Severity Index (ESI), shift, age, gender, patient pain level, and ED occupancy were tested using univariate analyses (Pearson's correlation, Wilcoxon rank sum test, or Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test, as appropriate) and multivariable linear regression with all results reported using a p-value of less than 0.05 to determine significance. Linear regression was also used to assess the relationship of nurse experience, as measured by the number of triages coordinated by each emergency nurse, with each nurse's average triage duration. <br/><br/>Results/outcomes: There were 187,170 triage events conducted by 336 different triage nurses. The overall median triage duration was 4.2 minutes (IQR=3.0, 5.9). Median patient age was 39.8 (IQR=27.2, 53.7) and 45% were male. Shorter triage duration was significantly associated with day shift, higher ESI, lower patient age, male gender, and higher patient pain level (all p&lt;0.001) both in univariate and multivariable analyses. When assessing nurse experience, a 100% increase in the number of triages conducted by the emergency nurse yielded a 9% decrease in a nurse's average triage duration on average.<br/><br/>Implications: The study demonstrates that patient, system, and triage nurse factors significantly impact ED triage duration. This information may be useful in identifying methods to define nurse triage education, reduce triage duration, and improve ED throughput.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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