2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162577
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing Blood Culture Contamination Rates in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Reducing Blood Culture Contamination Rates in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Ross, Jason S., RN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Ohio Medical Center
Title:Nurse Manager
Contact Address:1805 27th Street, Portsmouth, OH, 45662, USA
Contact Telephone:740-356-8144
Co-Authors:Paul D. Folt, RN, BSN, CEN, EMT-P, EMSI; Jennifer L. Foit, RN, BSN
Leadership Conference - Evidence-Based Practice Abstract: Reducing Blood Culture Contamination Rates in the Emergency Department

Purpose: Blood Culture contamination has been confirmed to increase the cost of patient care, overuse of unnecessary antibiotics and increase the length of stay. The purpose of the study was to determine if contamination rates can be reduced following education of the nurses about the proper technique to use when initiating an IV & drawing blood cultures using evidence based practice.

Design: This was a quality improvement project with a comparison of contamination rates before and after the implementation and education of the modified blood draw protocol.

Setting: This study was completed in a 220 bed non-profit , teaching hospital in a small rural community in southern Ohio. The ED volume was 51,000 for FY 09, averaging over 446 blood cultures per month.

Participants/Subjects: All nursing staff in the ED received the education. All patients, regardless of age, received an IV and blood cultures drawn if ordered. Forty-one percent of the ED patients are age 64 or older.

Methods: The project design is quasi experimental. IRB approval was obtained. IRB recommended all staff be educated. The variables were the contaminated blood cultures and the nurse. A contaminated blood culture is defined as a specimen with bacteria from places other than a patientÆs bloodstream, most likely from skin or an IV catheter. For the purposes of this study the nurse is defined as a staff RN working in the ED with documented competency with IV skills on the past annual performance appraisal.
Following the nursing staff education, matched pairs of blood cultures were sent to the Microbiology Department who analyzed them using standard clinical practices to determine if the blood culture specimen was contaminated. The Microbiology Department tracked the contamination rates & provided data to the project team monthly.

Results/Outcomes: FY 2008, ED contamination rate was 2.6% compared to the hospital rate of 2.3%. The first 8 months of FY 2009, ED contamination rate was 3.1%, compared to the hospital rate of 1.8%. National benchmark is 2.7 %. ED Nursing staff received education regarding obtaining blood cultures while establishing IV access.
Four months post education , the average ED contamination rate is 1.9 % compared to the hospital average of 2.14%.

Implications: This reduction in blood culture contaminations results in improved care for 5-6 patients & cost savings of estimated $5,506 per patient. The ED staff was able to perform better than the hospital rate. The education provided to the ED nurses could be used in other ED settings & shared with phlebotomy & nurses working in other inpatient units. With a reduction in blood culture contaminations , it means better quality of care for patients, beds freed up for ED Admissions & cost savings for the patient & organization.




Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReducing Blood Culture Contamination Rates in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162577-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reducing Blood Culture Contamination Rates in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ross, Jason S., RN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Ohio Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1805 27th Street, Portsmouth, OH, 45662, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">740-356-8144</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rossj@somc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Paul D. Folt, RN, BSN, CEN, EMT-P, EMSI; Jennifer L. Foit, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Leadership Conference - Evidence-Based Practice Abstract: Reducing Blood Culture Contamination Rates in the Emergency Department<br/><br/>Purpose: Blood Culture contamination has been confirmed to increase the cost of patient care, overuse of unnecessary antibiotics and increase the length of stay. The purpose of the study was to determine if contamination rates can be reduced following education of the nurses about the proper technique to use when initiating an IV &amp; drawing blood cultures using evidence based practice.<br/><br/> Design: This was a quality improvement project with a comparison of contamination rates before and after the implementation and education of the modified blood draw protocol.<br/><br/>Setting: This study was completed in a 220 bed non-profit , teaching hospital in a small rural community in southern Ohio. The ED volume was 51,000 for FY 09, averaging over 446 blood cultures per month.<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: All nursing staff in the ED received the education. All patients, regardless of age, received an IV and blood cultures drawn if ordered. Forty-one percent of the ED patients are age 64 or older.<br/><br/>Methods: The project design is quasi experimental. IRB approval was obtained. IRB recommended all staff be educated. The variables were the contaminated blood cultures and the nurse. A contaminated blood culture is defined as a specimen with bacteria from places other than a patient&AElig;s bloodstream, most likely from skin or an IV catheter. For the purposes of this study the nurse is defined as a staff RN working in the ED with documented competency with IV skills on the past annual performance appraisal. <br/>Following the nursing staff education, matched pairs of blood cultures were sent to the Microbiology Department who analyzed them using standard clinical practices to determine if the blood culture specimen was contaminated. The Microbiology Department tracked the contamination rates &amp; provided data to the project team monthly. <br/><br/>Results/Outcomes: FY 2008, ED contamination rate was 2.6% compared to the hospital rate of 2.3%. The first 8 months of FY 2009, ED contamination rate was 3.1%, compared to the hospital rate of 1.8%. National benchmark is 2.7 %. ED Nursing staff received education regarding obtaining blood cultures while establishing IV access.<br/>Four months post education , the average ED contamination rate is 1.9 % compared to the hospital average of 2.14%.<br/><br/>Implications: This reduction in blood culture contaminations results in improved care for 5-6 patients &amp; cost savings of estimated $5,506 per patient. The ED staff was able to perform better than the hospital rate. The education provided to the ED nurses could be used in other ED settings &amp; shared with phlebotomy &amp; nurses working in other inpatient units. With a reduction in blood culture contaminations , it means better quality of care for patients, beds freed up for ED Admissions &amp; cost savings for the patient &amp; organization. <br/><br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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