2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162580
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Laying the Foundation for a Healthy Work Environment
Abstract:
Laying the Foundation for a Healthy Work Environment
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2010
Author:Walsh, Jill, RN, MS, DNP
P.I. Institution Name:Emergency Nurses Association
Title:Director of Professional Practice
Contact Address:915 Lee Street, Des Plaines, IL, 60016, USA
Contact Telephone:847-460-4046
Co-Authors:Olimpia Paun, PhD, PMHCNS-BC
Leadership Conference - Evidence-Based Practice Abstract: Laying the Foundation for a Healthy Work Environment


Purpose: According to the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), a work environment that fosters communication and teamwork is associated with staff satisfaction and increased patient safety. The purpose of this project was to respond at the healthcare organization level to the AACN Call to Action for establishing and sustaining healthy work environments by: 1) implementing a team training program that fosters the integration of communication and teamwork skills and tools into daily clinical practice and 2) evaluating change in use of communication skills and teamwork collaboration attitudes pre and post training.

Design: The evaluation design for this evidence-based change project was quasi-experimental and compared mean scores on the Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey¬ pre and post intervention and at interval periods to evaluate the effectiveness of the program.

Setting: Four medical/surgical units at a community suburban Midwestern hospital.

Participants/Subjects: All staff on the four units were invited to attend one of the initial training sessions. A total of 77 nurses, patient care technicians, and unit secretaries participated. This study was approved by the IRB.

Methods: The evidence-based Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamsSTEPPSTM) established by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) (2006) was used to provide training in communication and teamwork skills to nurses and ancillary staff. The seven hour program delivered by a clinical nurse specialist and unit nurse manager included a standardized Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation (SBAR) communication strategy for nursing change of shift report and telephone communication with physicians. The Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey¬ was used to evaluate perception of communication skills and teamwork climate at pre intervention, 45 days and one year post training.

Results: Outcome Objective: Increase use of effective communication skills. The 45-day post intervention survey response rate was 48%. Seventy-six percent of nurses (n = 25) and PCTs (n = 12) responded that after participating in the TeamSTEPPSTM workshop they communicated more effectively with the healthcare team, and 73% responded that they communicated more effectively with physicians. Eighty-one percent of the nurses responded that the SBAR format helped them convey complete and accurate information to the physician when calling with critical information.
Outcome Objective: Improve nursing perception of teamwork climate. Post intervention Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey¬ response rate at 45 days was 48%. The comparison of the mean responses of the pooled data of the nurses (n = 25) and PCTs (n = 12) showed significantly higher findings for nurses related to teamwork attitudes at baseline and 45-day follow-up. Post intervention Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey¬ response rate for the pilot unit was 57% at one year. Results showed no significant differences between means on the teamwork climate aggregate attitudes measure at baseline and one-year follow-up for the pilot unit (n =15). The Wilcoxon Two Sample Test was selected due to the small sample size.

Implications: If TeamSTEPPSTM training is successful in promoting communication and teamwork skills we may see increased patient safety in clinical areas.

Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLaying the Foundation for a Healthy Work Environmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162580-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Laying the Foundation for a Healthy Work Environment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walsh, Jill, RN, MS, DNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Professional Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">915 Lee Street, Des Plaines, IL, 60016, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">847-460-4046</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jwalsh@ena.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Olimpia Paun, PhD, PMHCNS-BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Leadership Conference - Evidence-Based Practice Abstract: Laying the Foundation for a Healthy Work Environment<br/><br/><br/>Purpose: According to the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), a work environment that fosters communication and teamwork is associated with staff satisfaction and increased patient safety. The purpose of this project was to respond at the healthcare organization level to the AACN Call to Action for establishing and sustaining healthy work environments by: 1) implementing a team training program that fosters the integration of communication and teamwork skills and tools into daily clinical practice and 2) evaluating change in use of communication skills and teamwork collaboration attitudes pre and post training.<br/><br/>Design: The evaluation design for this evidence-based change project was quasi-experimental and compared mean scores on the Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey&not; pre and post intervention and at interval periods to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. <br/><br/>Setting: Four medical/surgical units at a community suburban Midwestern hospital.<br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: All staff on the four units were invited to attend one of the initial training sessions. A total of 77 nurses, patient care technicians, and unit secretaries participated. This study was approved by the IRB.<br/><br/>Methods: The evidence-based Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamsSTEPPSTM) established by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) (2006) was used to provide training in communication and teamwork skills to nurses and ancillary staff. The seven hour program delivered by a clinical nurse specialist and unit nurse manager included a standardized Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation (SBAR) communication strategy for nursing change of shift report and telephone communication with physicians. The Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey&not; was used to evaluate perception of communication skills and teamwork climate at pre intervention, 45 days and one year post training. <br/><br/>Results: Outcome Objective: Increase use of effective communication skills. The 45-day post intervention survey response rate was 48%. Seventy-six percent of nurses (n = 25) and PCTs (n = 12) responded that after participating in the TeamSTEPPSTM workshop they communicated more effectively with the healthcare team, and 73% responded that they communicated more effectively with physicians. Eighty-one percent of the nurses responded that the SBAR format helped them convey complete and accurate information to the physician when calling with critical information. <br/>Outcome Objective: Improve nursing perception of teamwork climate. Post intervention Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey&not; response rate at 45 days was 48%. The comparison of the mean responses of the pooled data of the nurses (n = 25) and PCTs (n = 12) showed significantly higher findings for nurses related to teamwork attitudes at baseline and 45-day follow-up. Post intervention Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey&not; response rate for the pilot unit was 57% at one year. Results showed no significant differences between means on the teamwork climate aggregate attitudes measure at baseline and one-year follow-up for the pilot unit (n =15). The Wilcoxon Two Sample Test was selected due to the small sample size. <br/><br/>Implications: If TeamSTEPPSTM training is successful in promoting communication and teamwork skills we may see increased patient safety in clinical areas.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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