A Comparative Study of Serial Hematocrit Results of Specimens Obtained by Venipuncture and Those Obtained From a Saline Lock Device

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162582
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparative Study of Serial Hematocrit Results of Specimens Obtained by Venipuncture and Those Obtained From a Saline Lock Device
Abstract:
A Comparative Study of Serial Hematocrit Results of Specimens Obtained by Venipuncture and Those Obtained From a Saline Lock Device
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1996
Author:Sliwa, Jr., Casimir J., RN, CNIII
Most trauma patients in the ED have multiple hematocrits drawn to monitor hypovolemia. These blood draws are painful to the patient and frustrating for hospital staff when venipuncture sites are inaccessible or absent. The purpose of this study was to determine if hemodilution occurs when drawing blood for hematocrits from a saline lock device.

The study employed a quasi-experimental control by constancy repeated measures design using each subject as their own control.

The research was conducted at a teaching, regional level one trauma center with annual ED visits of 65,000.

A convenience sample of twenty-eight adult English speaking non-extremis trauma victims participated. The sixteen men and twelve women entered into the study had a mean age of 33.7 years.

Each subject had up to three hematocrits (control specimens) ordered and drawn by venipuncture according to standard trauma protocols. Within five minutes of obtaining each control specimen, a hematocrit was drawn from a saline lock (experimental specimen), after a 5cc discard volume was drawn. All hematocrits were measured on the Coulter STKS in the ED's lab. Results were analyzed using measure of central tendency and student' T-test for differences between the means.

The findings showed no significant differences (p>0.05) between hematocrits drawn from saline locks and those drawn from direct venipunctures. However, a small statistically significant subgroup of control specimen hematocrits drawn at the time of the IV starts were found to be hemoconcentrated (p>0.0009).

Based on these initial findings, drawing hematocrits from a saline lock is an accurate, easy pain free method of obtaining serial hematocrits which has implications for evaluating current blood drawing procedures. Variable levels of hemoconcentration based on extended tourniquet times used to start IV's, was a significant finding, but a larger sample is needed to verify this data. A follow-up study is now in progress. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparative Study of Serial Hematocrit Results of Specimens Obtained by Venipuncture and Those Obtained From a Saline Lock Deviceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162582-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparative Study of Serial Hematocrit Results of Specimens Obtained by Venipuncture and Those Obtained From a Saline Lock Device</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1996</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sliwa, Jr., Casimir J., RN, CNIII</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Most trauma patients in the ED have multiple hematocrits drawn to monitor hypovolemia. These blood draws are painful to the patient and frustrating for hospital staff when venipuncture sites are inaccessible or absent. The purpose of this study was to determine if hemodilution occurs when drawing blood for hematocrits from a saline lock device.<br/><br/>The study employed a quasi-experimental control by constancy repeated measures design using each subject as their own control.<br/><br/>The research was conducted at a teaching, regional level one trauma center with annual ED visits of 65,000.<br/><br/>A convenience sample of twenty-eight adult English speaking non-extremis trauma victims participated. The sixteen men and twelve women entered into the study had a mean age of 33.7 years.<br/><br/>Each subject had up to three hematocrits (control specimens) ordered and drawn by venipuncture according to standard trauma protocols. Within five minutes of obtaining each control specimen, a hematocrit was drawn from a saline lock (experimental specimen), after a 5cc discard volume was drawn. All hematocrits were measured on the Coulter STKS in the ED's lab. Results were analyzed using measure of central tendency and student' T-test for differences between the means.<br/><br/>The findings showed no significant differences (p&gt;0.05) between hematocrits drawn from saline locks and those drawn from direct venipunctures. However, a small statistically significant subgroup of control specimen hematocrits drawn at the time of the IV starts were found to be hemoconcentrated (p&gt;0.0009).<br/><br/>Based on these initial findings, drawing hematocrits from a saline lock is an accurate, easy pain free method of obtaining serial hematocrits which has implications for evaluating current blood drawing procedures. Variable levels of hemoconcentration based on extended tourniquet times used to start IV's, was a significant finding, but a larger sample is needed to verify this data. A follow-up study is now in progress. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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