DonÆt Call Them Ambulance Drivers: Building Better Nurse-Paramedic Relationships Through Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162584
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DonÆt Call Them Ambulance Drivers: Building Better Nurse-Paramedic Relationships Through Education
Abstract:
DonÆt Call Them Ambulance Drivers: Building Better Nurse-Paramedic Relationships Through Education
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1996
Author:Specht, Dawn, RN, MSN, CCRN, CEN
Co-Authors:Rita Jablonski, RN, MSN, CCRN
Emergency nurses often question why paramedics choose to perform or omit certain procedures when delivering prehospital care. The intent of this clinical project was to investigate the requirements for paramedic education in Pennsylvania and to share the findings with other emergency nurses. Two nurse educators planned and implemented the project by: (1) obtaining and reviewing the guidelines for paramedic education from the Pennsylvania Department of Health; (2) serving as adjunct faculty in a paramedic school; (3) informally sharing knowledge of the paramedic certification process with co-workers in area EDs, and (4) acting as mediators in nurse-paramedic conflicts. Three major outcomes were noted. First, nurses were unaware of the differences between emergency medical technicians and paramedics. Rather, they had grouped the roles together as ambulance drivers. Second, the educators discovered that conceptual differences lay at the root of most nurse-paramedic disputes. Paramedics were socialized and immersed in a culture of care that focused on immediate stabilization and transport. The culture of care familiar to emergency nurses, however, emphasizes immediate priorities in conjunction with long term outcomes. Third, emergency nurses stated that they felt more comfortable interacting with paramedics and other prehospital personnel. The nurses expressed interest in learning more about prehospital care and paramedic protocols. Several recommendations for clinical practice were apparent at the conclusion of this project. A need exists for the continuous development of in-services on prehospital care in all EDs. Formal research is necessary to investigate the effect of nurse-paramedic relationships on positive patient outcomes. Each member of the nurse-paramedic team must accept responsibility for initiating and maintaining open communication. This feedback should not be limited to situations in which there is a difference of opinion about treatment. The professional relationship that develops should be one that not only critiques, but also commends. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDonÆt Call Them Ambulance Drivers: Building Better Nurse-Paramedic Relationships Through Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162584-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Don&AElig;t Call Them Ambulance Drivers: Building Better Nurse-Paramedic Relationships Through Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1996</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Specht, Dawn, RN, MSN, CCRN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rita Jablonski, RN, MSN, CCRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Emergency nurses often question why paramedics choose to perform or omit certain procedures when delivering prehospital care. The intent of this clinical project was to investigate the requirements for paramedic education in Pennsylvania and to share the findings with other emergency nurses. Two nurse educators planned and implemented the project by: (1) obtaining and reviewing the guidelines for paramedic education from the Pennsylvania Department of Health; (2) serving as adjunct faculty in a paramedic school; (3) informally sharing knowledge of the paramedic certification process with co-workers in area EDs, and (4) acting as mediators in nurse-paramedic conflicts. Three major outcomes were noted. First, nurses were unaware of the differences between emergency medical technicians and paramedics. Rather, they had grouped the roles together as ambulance drivers. Second, the educators discovered that conceptual differences lay at the root of most nurse-paramedic disputes. Paramedics were socialized and immersed in a culture of care that focused on immediate stabilization and transport. The culture of care familiar to emergency nurses, however, emphasizes immediate priorities in conjunction with long term outcomes. Third, emergency nurses stated that they felt more comfortable interacting with paramedics and other prehospital personnel. The nurses expressed interest in learning more about prehospital care and paramedic protocols. Several recommendations for clinical practice were apparent at the conclusion of this project. A need exists for the continuous development of in-services on prehospital care in all EDs. Formal research is necessary to investigate the effect of nurse-paramedic relationships on positive patient outcomes. Each member of the nurse-paramedic team must accept responsibility for initiating and maintaining open communication. This feedback should not be limited to situations in which there is a difference of opinion about treatment. The professional relationship that develops should be one that not only critiques, but also commends. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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