The Relationship of Certification to Job Satisfaction, Autonomy and Salaries in Emergency Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162586
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Certification to Job Satisfaction, Autonomy and Salaries in Emergency Nurses
Abstract:
The Relationship of Certification to Job Satisfaction, Autonomy and Salaries in Emergency Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1996
Author:Wilhoit, Corinne, RN, MS
Purpose: This study explored the relationship of certification as a Certified Emergency Nurse (CEN) to job satisfaction, autonomy, and salaries in emergency nurses. With Stamps and Piedmonte's conception of job satisfaction as a framework, it was hypothesized that certified nurses would report: 1) greater job satisfaction and autonomy than non-certified nurses; and 2) salary increase as a result of certification.

Design: One-time comparative survey of certified and non-certified ED nurses using a mailed questionnaire.

Setting and Sample: Eligible subjects were registered nurses, male or female, who: (a) worked at least 24 hours a week in the ED; (b) did not hold an administrative position; and (c) had a minimum of one year experience in the ED. A convenience sample was obtained from nurse managers at 17 acute care facilities in the Oklahoma City and Tulsa areas and from a mailing list of Certified Emergency Nurses in Oklahoma (n=37) provided by the Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing.

Methodology: Eighty-six certified and 95 non-certified nurses completed Stamps and Piedmonte's Index of Work Satisfaction and an investigator-developed questionnaire on demographics and certification history.

Results: Tests revealed that certified nurses had significantly higher total satisfaction, satisfaction with pay, and satisfaction with autonomy than the non-certified nurses. Of the certified nurses, 31.4% received a salary increase as a result of certification. The chief reasons for seeking certification were for professional competence and personal satisfaction. The chief barriers were cost, time required to prepare, and lack of perceived benefits.

Conclusions: Educators and managers can encourage certification as it appears to be related to work satisfaction and autonomy. As there was no pretest prior to certification, it cannot be concluded that increased satisfaction and autonomy were results of certification. The design does not allow conclusions about the direction of causality. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship of Certification to Job Satisfaction, Autonomy and Salaries in Emergency Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162586-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship of Certification to Job Satisfaction, Autonomy and Salaries in Emergency Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1996</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilhoit, Corinne, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study explored the relationship of certification as a Certified Emergency Nurse (CEN) to job satisfaction, autonomy, and salaries in emergency nurses. With Stamps and Piedmonte's conception of job satisfaction as a framework, it was hypothesized that certified nurses would report: 1) greater job satisfaction and autonomy than non-certified nurses; and 2) salary increase as a result of certification.<br/><br/>Design: One-time comparative survey of certified and non-certified ED nurses using a mailed questionnaire.<br/><br/>Setting and Sample: Eligible subjects were registered nurses, male or female, who: (a) worked at least 24 hours a week in the ED; (b) did not hold an administrative position; and (c) had a minimum of one year experience in the ED. A convenience sample was obtained from nurse managers at 17 acute care facilities in the Oklahoma City and Tulsa areas and from a mailing list of Certified Emergency Nurses in Oklahoma (n=37) provided by the Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing.<br/><br/>Methodology: Eighty-six certified and 95 non-certified nurses completed Stamps and Piedmonte's Index of Work Satisfaction and an investigator-developed questionnaire on demographics and certification history.<br/><br/>Results: Tests revealed that certified nurses had significantly higher total satisfaction, satisfaction with pay, and satisfaction with autonomy than the non-certified nurses. Of the certified nurses, 31.4% received a salary increase as a result of certification. The chief reasons for seeking certification were for professional competence and personal satisfaction. The chief barriers were cost, time required to prepare, and lack of perceived benefits.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Educators and managers can encourage certification as it appears to be related to work satisfaction and autonomy. As there was no pretest prior to certification, it cannot be concluded that increased satisfaction and autonomy were results of certification. The design does not allow conclusions about the direction of causality. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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