2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162590
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Phlebitis in Field Started IVs
Abstract:
Phlebitis in Field Started IVs
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1995
Author:Belcher, Margaret
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville Hospital
Contact Address:530 S. Jackson, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of phlebitis associated with intravenous lines (IVs) started in the field by paramedics and registered nurses. In the field was defined as any IV started outside the physical confines of a health care setting or in the emergency department, that was not dressed with a clear occlusive dressing and labeled with the date, time, gauge, and initiated. Due to an increased incidence of phlebitis reported at one urban medical center, a policy was written to support the practice of pulling and restarting every field started IV when the patient was admitted to an inpatient unit. This study was done in response to that policy.

Methods: Between July 1991 and April 1992, all patients admitted to the hospital on randomly selected days via the emergency department (ED) with field started IVs had their IV sites observed daily for three consecutive days for signs and symptoms of phlebitis. Phlebitis for the purpose of this study was defined as a 5 mm diameter of erythema at the venipuncture site, red streaks extending 1 cm upward from the IV site, or purulent drainage from the venipuncture area.

Results: One hundred forty-one (N=141) IV sites were observed; 101 were started by RNs in the ED and 40 by paramedics prior to the patients' arrival at the ED. Nine IV sites became phlebitic; two were identified on day one, five on day two, and two on day three. Seven of the phlebitic sites were started with #18 angiocaths and two with #16 angiocaths. The phlebitic sites included three in the hand, three in the forearm, two in the antecubital area and one in the wrist. Five of the nine phlebitic sites were started by RNs, the remaining four were initiated by paramedics. Overall, the phlebitic rate was .06% (9 of 141). Insertion site, angiocath size, dressing and labeling of the site, and whether the site was started by an RN or paramedic did not influence phlebitis.

Conclusion: The results of this study did not support the current policy of discontinuing field started IVs. Maintaining IVs initiated in the ED or pre-hospital care setting decreases healthcare costs by eliminating unnecessary nursing time and IV set-up costs. This study is significant to emergency nursing, it demonstrates that although IVs are started on unstable critically ill patients, the technique is safe and complications minimal. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhlebitis in Field Started IVsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162590-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Phlebitis in Field Started IVs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Belcher, Margaret</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">530 S. Jackson, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of phlebitis associated with intravenous lines (IVs) started in the field by paramedics and registered nurses. In the field was defined as any IV started outside the physical confines of a health care setting or in the emergency department, that was not dressed with a clear occlusive dressing and labeled with the date, time, gauge, and initiated. Due to an increased incidence of phlebitis reported at one urban medical center, a policy was written to support the practice of pulling and restarting every field started IV when the patient was admitted to an inpatient unit. This study was done in response to that policy.<br/><br/>Methods: Between July 1991 and April 1992, all patients admitted to the hospital on randomly selected days via the emergency department (ED) with field started IVs had their IV sites observed daily for three consecutive days for signs and symptoms of phlebitis. Phlebitis for the purpose of this study was defined as a 5 mm diameter of erythema at the venipuncture site, red streaks extending 1 cm upward from the IV site, or purulent drainage from the venipuncture area.<br/><br/>Results: One hundred forty-one (N=141) IV sites were observed; 101 were started by RNs in the ED and 40 by paramedics prior to the patients' arrival at the ED. Nine IV sites became phlebitic; two were identified on day one, five on day two, and two on day three. Seven of the phlebitic sites were started with #18 angiocaths and two with #16 angiocaths. The phlebitic sites included three in the hand, three in the forearm, two in the antecubital area and one in the wrist. Five of the nine phlebitic sites were started by RNs, the remaining four were initiated by paramedics. Overall, the phlebitic rate was .06% (9 of 141). Insertion site, angiocath size, dressing and labeling of the site, and whether the site was started by an RN or paramedic did not influence phlebitis.<br/><br/>Conclusion: The results of this study did not support the current policy of discontinuing field started IVs. Maintaining IVs initiated in the ED or pre-hospital care setting decreases healthcare costs by eliminating unnecessary nursing time and IV set-up costs. This study is significant to emergency nursing, it demonstrates that although IVs are started on unstable critically ill patients, the technique is safe and complications minimal. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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