2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162591
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Four Methods of Warming Intravenous Fluids
Abstract:
Evaluation of Four Methods of Warming Intravenous Fluids
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1995
Author:Bernardo, Lisa M.
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh
Contact Address:One Children's Place, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA
Co-Authors:Richard Henker, Kathleen O'Connor, and Susan Sereika
Purpose: Hypothermia occurs in injured children due to environmental exposure, elapsed time during transport, fluid resuscitation, and large body surface area to mass ratio. Treatment for hypothermia often includes administration of warmed intravenous fluid (IVF). Infusion of small volumes of warmed IVF at slow flow rates allows the IVF to cool in the intravenous tubing prior to delivery. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare four methods of warming IVF with a control of unwarmed IVF at flow rates of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 mL/hr.

Design & Setting: Four methods of warming fluids were compared with a control of unwarmed IVF using an experimental design. Each method of warming and the control were evaluated at each flow rate and replicated two more times. This study was conducted in a laboratory.

Methods: The methods of warming IVF in this study included: 1) the Level 1 System 250 fluid warmer with D-60HL tubing (Level 1 Technologies, Inc., Rockland, MA); 2) the Level 1 System 250 fluid warmer with D-50 tubing (Level 1 Technologies, Inc.); 3) the Hotline fluid warmer with L-70 tubing (Level 1 Technologies, Inc.); and 4) the Baxter DW 1000 D blood fluid warmer with blood cuff set tubing (Model No. 67N25000, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Valencia, CA). The infusion rate was controlled with the Ivion CT113 Infusion Pump (Englewood, CO). The IVF temperatures were measured with thermocouples (Model 872A & Model HH21, Omega Engineering, Inc., Stamford, CT) calibrated to a standardized thermometer. Temperatures were measured in the IVF solution bag (Tsoln) and at 2 cm proximal to the distal end of the fluid warmer tubing (Tdist). Ambient temperature, Tsoln, and Tdist were recorded when Tdist was stable for 3 minutes. Data were analyzed using a two-way ANCOVA to determine the effects of the method of warming and infusion rates on Tdist, treating ambient temperature as a covariate.

Results: A significant interaction was observed between method of warming and infusion rate (p<0.05). In particular, the Tdist increased as the flow rate increased for the Level 1 warmer with D-50 tubing and the Baxter warmer with blood cuff set tubing with the maximum Tdist being less than 37¦C. The Level 1 warmer with D-60HL tubing and the Hotline warmer with L-70 tubing consistently delivered IVF at temperatures >37¦C at all infusion rates with little variation in temperature across the rates. Little variation in Tsoln occurred during data collection (mean +/- SD = 21.14 +/- 0.796¦C).

Conclusion: The Level 1 fluid warmer with the D-60HL tubing and the Hot Line warmer with L-70 tubing provided fluid at greater than 37¦C at flow rates tested in this study. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Four Methods of Warming Intravenous Fluidsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162591-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Four Methods of Warming Intravenous Fluids</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bernardo, Lisa M.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">One Children's Place, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Richard Henker, Kathleen O'Connor, and Susan Sereika</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Hypothermia occurs in injured children due to environmental exposure, elapsed time during transport, fluid resuscitation, and large body surface area to mass ratio. Treatment for hypothermia often includes administration of warmed intravenous fluid (IVF). Infusion of small volumes of warmed IVF at slow flow rates allows the IVF to cool in the intravenous tubing prior to delivery. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare four methods of warming IVF with a control of unwarmed IVF at flow rates of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 mL/hr.<br/><br/>Design &amp; Setting: Four methods of warming fluids were compared with a control of unwarmed IVF using an experimental design. Each method of warming and the control were evaluated at each flow rate and replicated two more times. This study was conducted in a laboratory.<br/><br/>Methods: The methods of warming IVF in this study included: 1) the Level 1 System 250 fluid warmer with D-60HL tubing (Level 1 Technologies, Inc., Rockland, MA); 2) the Level 1 System 250 fluid warmer with D-50 tubing (Level 1 Technologies, Inc.); 3) the Hotline fluid warmer with L-70 tubing (Level 1 Technologies, Inc.); and 4) the Baxter DW 1000 D blood fluid warmer with blood cuff set tubing (Model No. 67N25000, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Valencia, CA). The infusion rate was controlled with the Ivion CT113 Infusion Pump (Englewood, CO). The IVF temperatures were measured with thermocouples (Model 872A &amp; Model HH21, Omega Engineering, Inc., Stamford, CT) calibrated to a standardized thermometer. Temperatures were measured in the IVF solution bag (Tsoln) and at 2 cm proximal to the distal end of the fluid warmer tubing (Tdist). Ambient temperature, Tsoln, and Tdist were recorded when Tdist was stable for 3 minutes. Data were analyzed using a two-way ANCOVA to determine the effects of the method of warming and infusion rates on Tdist, treating ambient temperature as a covariate.<br/><br/>Results: A significant interaction was observed between method of warming and infusion rate (p&lt;0.05). In particular, the Tdist increased as the flow rate increased for the Level 1 warmer with D-50 tubing and the Baxter warmer with blood cuff set tubing with the maximum Tdist being less than 37&brvbar;C. The Level 1 warmer with D-60HL tubing and the Hotline warmer with L-70 tubing consistently delivered IVF at temperatures &gt;37&brvbar;C at all infusion rates with little variation in temperature across the rates. Little variation in Tsoln occurred during data collection (mean +/- SD = 21.14 +/- 0.796&brvbar;C).<br/><br/>Conclusion: The Level 1 fluid warmer with the D-60HL tubing and the Hot Line warmer with L-70 tubing provided fluid at greater than 37&brvbar;C at flow rates tested in this study. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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