2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162593
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prediction of Children at Risk for Subsequent Injury
Abstract:
Prediction of Children at Risk for Subsequent Injury
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1995
Author:Bruce, Beth
P.I. Institution Name:IWK Hospital for Children
Contact Address:5850 University Ave., Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3J 3G9, Canada
Co-Authors:Valerie Eden and Janet Lake
Purpose: Unintentional injury is the leading case of mortality and morbidity in children. Such injuries account for a significant number of children being treated at hospital care facilities each year. This study examines the relationship between rates of injury among Canadian preschool children and their parents' risk perceptions, safety behaviors, parenting stress, and children's risk behaviors. The investigators hypothesized that children have increased rates in families where the parents have low perception of risk of hazard, low score for safety behaviors, a high level of parenting stress, and in which the child has increased risky behavior.

Methods: Two hundred parents of preschool aged children were surveyed using the CHIRPP database, Injury Behavior Checklist (Speltz, 1990), Perception of Risk Scale (Glik, Knonenfeld & Jackson, 1991), TIPP Scale (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1994) and the Parenting Stress Index (Abidin, 1985). All instruments have documented adequate internal consistency except the TIPP form.

Results: The sample consisted of 95 injured children and 97 non-injured children. Ninety-two percent of the injured children were triaged as non-urgent, 82% of injuries occurred at home, and 76% were either diagnosed as lacerations or injuries due to falls. Parents of injured children reported higher rates of injury behaviors (mean = 51.8) than parents of non-injured children (mean = 47.7). There were no significant differences between parents' perceptions of risk of injury, perceptions of risk of hazard, or reported levels of parenting stress for either group of injured or non-injured children. Younger children scored higher on the injury behavior checklist and the parents of these children reported increased parent distress and overall parenting stress. No differences were found between the male and female children on any measure.

Conclusion: Families participating in this study will continue to be followed throughout the next year to examine relationships between injury behavior, perception of risk and hazard, safety behaviors and children's rates of injuries. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrediction of Children at Risk for Subsequent Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162593-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prediction of Children at Risk for Subsequent Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bruce, Beth</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">IWK Hospital for Children</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5850 University Ave., Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3J 3G9, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Valerie Eden and Janet Lake</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Unintentional injury is the leading case of mortality and morbidity in children. Such injuries account for a significant number of children being treated at hospital care facilities each year. This study examines the relationship between rates of injury among Canadian preschool children and their parents' risk perceptions, safety behaviors, parenting stress, and children's risk behaviors. The investigators hypothesized that children have increased rates in families where the parents have low perception of risk of hazard, low score for safety behaviors, a high level of parenting stress, and in which the child has increased risky behavior.<br/><br/>Methods: Two hundred parents of preschool aged children were surveyed using the CHIRPP database, Injury Behavior Checklist (Speltz, 1990), Perception of Risk Scale (Glik, Knonenfeld &amp; Jackson, 1991), TIPP Scale (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1994) and the Parenting Stress Index (Abidin, 1985). All instruments have documented adequate internal consistency except the TIPP form.<br/><br/>Results: The sample consisted of 95 injured children and 97 non-injured children. Ninety-two percent of the injured children were triaged as non-urgent, 82% of injuries occurred at home, and 76% were either diagnosed as lacerations or injuries due to falls. Parents of injured children reported higher rates of injury behaviors (mean = 51.8) than parents of non-injured children (mean = 47.7). There were no significant differences between parents' perceptions of risk of injury, perceptions of risk of hazard, or reported levels of parenting stress for either group of injured or non-injured children. Younger children scored higher on the injury behavior checklist and the parents of these children reported increased parent distress and overall parenting stress. No differences were found between the male and female children on any measure.<br/><br/>Conclusion: Families participating in this study will continue to be followed throughout the next year to examine relationships between injury behavior, perception of risk and hazard, safety behaviors and children's rates of injuries. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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