A Description of the Needs of Families of Critically Ill/Injured During the Emergent Treatment Period

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162594
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Description of the Needs of Families of Critically Ill/Injured During the Emergent Treatment Period
Abstract:
A Description of the Needs of Families of Critically Ill/Injured During the Emergent Treatment Period
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1995
Author:Campbell, Melody
P.I. Institution Name:Upper Valley Medical Centers
Contact Address:920 Summit Avenue, Troy, OH, 45373, USA
Co-Authors:Connie Dishon, and Michele Marshall
Purpose: Emergency departments have traditionally focused on the patient's physiological needs while the patient's family has most often been relegated to the waiting room to await news of the patient's condition and prognosis. During the last several years, the focus of the critically ill/injured patient has begun to include the family. The purpose of this study was to describe the needs of families of critically ill/injured patients during the emergent treatment period and determine whether those needs were met.

Design: A descriptive design utilizing the Emergency Department Family Needs Inventory (EDFNI) was used to survey family members and significant others on the important of needs related to assurance, comfort, proximity, information and support.

Setting: This research was conducted at a large tertiary care hospital with annual emergency department visits of 45,000.

Sample: The convenience sample consisted of 50 family members present during the emergency treatment period. The majority of subjects were males (68%) and over 60 years of age (74%).

Methodology: Data were collected by administration of the EDFNI to family members of critically ill/injured patients during their treatment in the emergency department. The EDFNI, a written survey, is an altered form of the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Content validity index for the EDFNI is 0.98. Also collected were demographic data and whether the ED was quiet, steady, or busy.

Results: The top five needs identified as being very important by at least 90% of the sample were: 1) to know the prognosis (94%); 2) to have questions answered honestly (94%); 3) to talk to the doctor (93.8%); 4) to be assured the best care is given (91.8%); and 5) to know specifics about the condition (90%). Additionally, eight of the top 12 identified needs were met at least 90% of the time.

Conclusions: Results of this study are consistent with previous studies examining needs of families of critically ill patients during the hospitalization period. Significantly, four of the top five needs of emergency department families involved needs for information. Implications for emergency nursing practice include ensuring that families have opportunities to speak with the physician caring for the patient and informing families about tests and procedures, specifics related to the disease or injury, and honest responses about severity of condition. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Description of the Needs of Families of Critically Ill/Injured During the Emergent Treatment Perioden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162594-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Description of the Needs of Families of Critically Ill/Injured During the Emergent Treatment Period</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Campbell, Melody</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Upper Valley Medical Centers</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">920 Summit Avenue, Troy, OH, 45373, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Connie Dishon, and Michele Marshall</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Emergency departments have traditionally focused on the patient's physiological needs while the patient's family has most often been relegated to the waiting room to await news of the patient's condition and prognosis. During the last several years, the focus of the critically ill/injured patient has begun to include the family. The purpose of this study was to describe the needs of families of critically ill/injured patients during the emergent treatment period and determine whether those needs were met.<br/><br/>Design: A descriptive design utilizing the Emergency Department Family Needs Inventory (EDFNI) was used to survey family members and significant others on the important of needs related to assurance, comfort, proximity, information and support.<br/><br/>Setting: This research was conducted at a large tertiary care hospital with annual emergency department visits of 45,000.<br/><br/>Sample: The convenience sample consisted of 50 family members present during the emergency treatment period. The majority of subjects were males (68%) and over 60 years of age (74%).<br/><br/>Methodology: Data were collected by administration of the EDFNI to family members of critically ill/injured patients during their treatment in the emergency department. The EDFNI, a written survey, is an altered form of the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Content validity index for the EDFNI is 0.98. Also collected were demographic data and whether the ED was quiet, steady, or busy.<br/><br/>Results: The top five needs identified as being very important by at least 90% of the sample were: 1) to know the prognosis (94%); 2) to have questions answered honestly (94%); 3) to talk to the doctor (93.8%); 4) to be assured the best care is given (91.8%); and 5) to know specifics about the condition (90%). Additionally, eight of the top 12 identified needs were met at least 90% of the time.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Results of this study are consistent with previous studies examining needs of families of critically ill patients during the hospitalization period. Significantly, four of the top five needs of emergency department families involved needs for information. Implications for emergency nursing practice include ensuring that families have opportunities to speak with the physician caring for the patient and informing families about tests and procedures, specifics related to the disease or injury, and honest responses about severity of condition. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.