2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162596
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Triage Nurse/Physician Correlation of Emergency Department Patient Disposition
Abstract:
Triage Nurse/Physician Correlation of Emergency Department Patient Disposition
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1995
Author:Doubrava, Janet
P.I. Institution Name:Yale New Haven Hospital
Contact Address:20 York Street, New Haven, CT, 6504, USA
Co-Authors:Melva Kravitz, Harry Moskovitz, and John Schriver
Purpose: Patients seen in the Emergency Department (ED) and subsequently admitted to the hospital have an ED length of stay dependent on two related but separate phases: 1) initial triage until admission orders are written, and 2) time from written physician order until transfer to an assigned inpatient bed. The ED was considering a procedural change whereby the Triage Nurse (TN) might initiate inpatient bed assignment at time of initial triage for those patients expected to be admitted in order to decrease the second phase. This study examined the accuracy of TN prediction of patient disposition and subsequent physician decision. The hypothesis was there is no difference between the TN's prediction of patient disposition and the patient's final disposition by the physician. No difference was defined as 90%.

Design: A prospective, descriptive study was conducted.

Setting: This study was conducted in a Level I urban teaching hospital trauma center Adult ED with 56,000 annual visits.

Sample: During the 21 day study, 2,804 patients entered the ED with 639 (23%) admitted and 2,165 (77%) discharged.

Methodology: After assessment, each TN indicated on a data sheet the patient's chief complaint and then predicted whether the patient was expected to be admitted or discharged. A Likert scale was marked to indicate confidence in the prediction. Data regarding actual patient disposition were collected and predicted versus actual dispositions were compared.

Results: Data were collected on 1,967 (70%) patients with 441 (23%) admitted and 1,516 (77%) discharged. The TN accurately predicted admission for 351; admission when discharged for 235; discharge for 1,281; and discharge when admitted for 90. Overall, TNs had an 80% accuracy rate in predicting admission of patients who were subsequently admitted. Prediction of admission when patient was discharged occurred 16% of the time. TNs accurately predicted discharge 84% of the time and predicted discharge of patients who were, in fact, admitted 20% of the time. Secondary analysis identified patient populations the TN was accurately able to predict, along with analysis of each TN's predictions and staffing levels related to visits by shift.

Conclusion: Triage nurses were able to accurately predict patient disposition 80% of the time. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTriage Nurse/Physician Correlation of Emergency Department Patient Dispositionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162596-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Triage Nurse/Physician Correlation of Emergency Department Patient Disposition</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doubrava, Janet</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yale New Haven Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">20 York Street, New Haven, CT, 6504, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Melva Kravitz, Harry Moskovitz, and John Schriver</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Patients seen in the Emergency Department (ED) and subsequently admitted to the hospital have an ED length of stay dependent on two related but separate phases: 1) initial triage until admission orders are written, and 2) time from written physician order until transfer to an assigned inpatient bed. The ED was considering a procedural change whereby the Triage Nurse (TN) might initiate inpatient bed assignment at time of initial triage for those patients expected to be admitted in order to decrease the second phase. This study examined the accuracy of TN prediction of patient disposition and subsequent physician decision. The hypothesis was there is no difference between the TN's prediction of patient disposition and the patient's final disposition by the physician. No difference was defined as 90%.<br/><br/>Design: A prospective, descriptive study was conducted.<br/><br/>Setting: This study was conducted in a Level I urban teaching hospital trauma center Adult ED with 56,000 annual visits.<br/><br/>Sample: During the 21 day study, 2,804 patients entered the ED with 639 (23%) admitted and 2,165 (77%) discharged.<br/><br/>Methodology: After assessment, each TN indicated on a data sheet the patient's chief complaint and then predicted whether the patient was expected to be admitted or discharged. A Likert scale was marked to indicate confidence in the prediction. Data regarding actual patient disposition were collected and predicted versus actual dispositions were compared.<br/><br/>Results: Data were collected on 1,967 (70%) patients with 441 (23%) admitted and 1,516 (77%) discharged. The TN accurately predicted admission for 351; admission when discharged for 235; discharge for 1,281; and discharge when admitted for 90. Overall, TNs had an 80% accuracy rate in predicting admission of patients who were subsequently admitted. Prediction of admission when patient was discharged occurred 16% of the time. TNs accurately predicted discharge 84% of the time and predicted discharge of patients who were, in fact, admitted 20% of the time. Secondary analysis identified patient populations the TN was accurately able to predict, along with analysis of each TN's predictions and staffing levels related to visits by shift.<br/><br/>Conclusion: Triage nurses were able to accurately predict patient disposition 80% of the time. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.