2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162600
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parentally-Abducted Children: Cues to Suspected Diagnosis
Abstract:
Parentally-Abducted Children: Cues to Suspected Diagnosis
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1995
Author:Hodges, Heide A.
Contact Address:, Spokane, WA, 99210, USA
Co-Authors:Margaret Auld Bruya
Purpose: In 1988, more than 350,000 children were abducted. Numbers of abducted children reported to missing children's organizations are increasing each year. Abducted children are difficult to locate. Abducted children are likely to be treated in emergency settings. This study explored the knowledge, ability to diagnose, and willingness to report parentally-abducted children by emergency health services (EHS) professionals.

Design and Setting: A randomized stratified geographic sampling method selected nine states within three regions of the United States for this exploratory, descriptive study. Southeast states were Alabama, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Northwest states were Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wyoming. Southwest states were Colorado, New Mexico, and Oklahoma.

Sample: Subjects from selected states were randomly selected from state lists purchased from the Emergency Nurses Association, the American College of Emergency Physicians, nurse practitioner associations, and the American Academy of Physician Assistants. Subjects had less than one to more than 20 years of experience in healthcare. Registered nurses comprised 67%, physicians 23%, nurse practitioners 7%, physician assistants 1%, and LPNs .01%. Most of the subjects were parents and 7% reported prior experience with child abduction.

Methodology: Surveys were mailed to 298 EHS professionals. Each subject received the Knowledge of Parental Abduction scale, Hodges Abducted Child Cue scale, Clinical Scenarios, and demographic questionnaire. A follow-up postcard was mailed to all subjects.

Result: One hundred thirteen instruments were returned (38%). EHS professionals' knowledge correlated highly (r=.76, p<.01) with child abduction experts and correlated significantly with diagnosis (r=.31, p=.001). Scenarios depicting abducted children were correctly identified 66% of the time. Eighteen of 25 cues were valued to diagnose child abduction. Subjects reporting experience with abducted children provided diagnostic cues. Intention to report was less than diagnosis. Uncertainty and belief the child was not endangered were the most frequently reported reasons for intention not to report.

Conclusion: EHS professionals can correctly identify parentally-abducted children given simulated scenarios. Cues valued by subjects without experience with child abduction are closely aligned with diagnostic cues provided by subjects with experience. These cues may be useful in recognition of parentally-abducted children within the emergency setting. In clinical scenarios, intention to report was less than recognition. Research is needed to validate diagnostic cues valued by EHS professionals and to elaborate upon reasons for intention not to report. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParentally-Abducted Children: Cues to Suspected Diagnosisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162600-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parentally-Abducted Children: Cues to Suspected Diagnosis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hodges, Heide A.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Spokane, WA, 99210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret Auld Bruya</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: In 1988, more than 350,000 children were abducted. Numbers of abducted children reported to missing children's organizations are increasing each year. Abducted children are difficult to locate. Abducted children are likely to be treated in emergency settings. This study explored the knowledge, ability to diagnose, and willingness to report parentally-abducted children by emergency health services (EHS) professionals. <br/><br/>Design and Setting: A randomized stratified geographic sampling method selected nine states within three regions of the United States for this exploratory, descriptive study. Southeast states were Alabama, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Northwest states were Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wyoming. Southwest states were Colorado, New Mexico, and Oklahoma.<br/><br/>Sample: Subjects from selected states were randomly selected from state lists purchased from the Emergency Nurses Association, the American College of Emergency Physicians, nurse practitioner associations, and the American Academy of Physician Assistants. Subjects had less than one to more than 20 years of experience in healthcare. Registered nurses comprised 67%, physicians 23%, nurse practitioners 7%, physician assistants 1%, and LPNs .01%. Most of the subjects were parents and 7% reported prior experience with child abduction.<br/><br/>Methodology: Surveys were mailed to 298 EHS professionals. Each subject received the Knowledge of Parental Abduction scale, Hodges Abducted Child Cue scale, Clinical Scenarios, and demographic questionnaire. A follow-up postcard was mailed to all subjects.<br/><br/>Result: One hundred thirteen instruments were returned (38%). EHS professionals' knowledge correlated highly (r=.76, p&lt;.01) with child abduction experts and correlated significantly with diagnosis (r=.31, p=.001). Scenarios depicting abducted children were correctly identified 66% of the time. Eighteen of 25 cues were valued to diagnose child abduction. Subjects reporting experience with abducted children provided diagnostic cues. Intention to report was less than diagnosis. Uncertainty and belief the child was not endangered were the most frequently reported reasons for intention not to report.<br/><br/>Conclusion: EHS professionals can correctly identify parentally-abducted children given simulated scenarios. Cues valued by subjects without experience with child abduction are closely aligned with diagnostic cues provided by subjects with experience. These cues may be useful in recognition of parentally-abducted children within the emergency setting. In clinical scenarios, intention to report was less than recognition. Research is needed to validate diagnostic cues valued by EHS professionals and to elaborate upon reasons for intention not to report. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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