The Relationship Between the Cultural Health Beliefs of Migrant Farmworkers and Immunization Compliance for Their Preschool Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162601
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Between the Cultural Health Beliefs of Migrant Farmworkers and Immunization Compliance for Their Preschool Children
Abstract:
The Relationship Between the Cultural Health Beliefs of Migrant Farmworkers and Immunization Compliance for Their Preschool Children
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1995
Author:Hottinger, Janet
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Contact Address:, Oshkosh, WI, USA
Background: Current statistics of reported vaccine preventable diseases are an indication that our prevailing immunization practices are not effective in covering all the barriers to immunization compliance. A probable source of this inconsistent compliance record is thought to be beliefs related to immunization: the purpose of immunizations, their advantages and disadvantages. While research supports cultural influences on health beliefs in general, cultural differences have not been investigated in the area of childhood immunizations.

Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to identify and describe how migrant farmworkers perceive health and how those beliefs influence immunization compliance.

Design: This research study will utilize a non-experimental descriptive design.

Sample and Setting: The target population of subjects includes migrant parents or guardians of children who participate in or live on a migrant farm site in Northeastern Wisconsin. A convenience sample of 100 parents or guardians will be selected from the small migrant medical clinic which serves 8,000 migrant, seasonal, and agricultural workers and their families. Data collection will begin in May of 1995 during the planting and harvesting period.

Instrument: A two part anonymous questionnaire will be utilized to collect data for this study. Part I will elicit demographic data about the participants and confirm employment or residency on a migrant farm. Part II will assess participants' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs underlying parental decisions regarding well child services using the Health Belief Model (HBM) questionnaire developed by Bates (1994). The HBM includes 48 items and has been demonstrated to be internally consistent. Participants will be given the option of utilizing a Spanish or English translation of the questionnaire.

Analysis: Demographic and Health Belief Model data will be analyzed reporting frequencies and measures of central tendency and spread.

Implications: This study will increase our understanding of the unique cultural connotations, interests and motives for health promotion or illness prevention of the migrant worker. Investigating these cultural beliefs, values, and diversities will facilitate the administration of immunization more efficiently to all children regardless of learned customs. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Between the Cultural Health Beliefs of Migrant Farmworkers and Immunization Compliance for Their Preschool Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162601-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship Between the Cultural Health Beliefs of Migrant Farmworkers and Immunization Compliance for Their Preschool Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hottinger, Janet</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Oshkosh, WI, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Current statistics of reported vaccine preventable diseases are an indication that our prevailing immunization practices are not effective in covering all the barriers to immunization compliance. A probable source of this inconsistent compliance record is thought to be beliefs related to immunization: the purpose of immunizations, their advantages and disadvantages. While research supports cultural influences on health beliefs in general, cultural differences have not been investigated in the area of childhood immunizations.<br/><br/>Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to identify and describe how migrant farmworkers perceive health and how those beliefs influence immunization compliance.<br/><br/>Design: This research study will utilize a non-experimental descriptive design.<br/><br/>Sample and Setting: The target population of subjects includes migrant parents or guardians of children who participate in or live on a migrant farm site in Northeastern Wisconsin. A convenience sample of 100 parents or guardians will be selected from the small migrant medical clinic which serves 8,000 migrant, seasonal, and agricultural workers and their families. Data collection will begin in May of 1995 during the planting and harvesting period. <br/><br/>Instrument: A two part anonymous questionnaire will be utilized to collect data for this study. Part I will elicit demographic data about the participants and confirm employment or residency on a migrant farm. Part II will assess participants' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs underlying parental decisions regarding well child services using the Health Belief Model (HBM) questionnaire developed by Bates (1994). The HBM includes 48 items and has been demonstrated to be internally consistent. Participants will be given the option of utilizing a Spanish or English translation of the questionnaire.<br/><br/>Analysis: Demographic and Health Belief Model data will be analyzed reporting frequencies and measures of central tendency and spread.<br/><br/>Implications: This study will increase our understanding of the unique cultural connotations, interests and motives for health promotion or illness prevention of the migrant worker. Investigating these cultural beliefs, values, and diversities will facilitate the administration of immunization more efficiently to all children regardless of learned customs. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:30:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:30:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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