2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162606
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advanced Emergency Nursing Practice: Preliminary Role-Delineation
Abstract:
Advanced Emergency Nursing Practice: Preliminary Role-Delineation
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1995
Author:Parshall, Mark B.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Contact Address:, USA
Purpose: Despite the fact that the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) has described advanced practice roles as underdeveloped and underutilized in emergency nursing, no data-based study of the emergency Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) role has ever been published. The few studies on the emergency Nurse Practitioner (NP) role are limited by sample size and design. Using the Emergency CNS Guidelines (ENA) and emergency NP literature as a conceptual framework, this study posed two questions: 1) What elements of clinical practice differentiate between advanced and basic emergency nursing practice? and 2) What differentiates between the roles of NP and CNS in emergency nursing?

Design and Study Sample: A secondary analysis of data from the 1990 Emergency Nursing Role Delineation Study (RDS; N=1011) was conducted. The secondary analysis sample (N=117) included all master's-prepared respondents (n=51), divided into two groups based on certification in emergency nursing (Master's+CEN, n=32; Master's non-certified, n=19). Two comparison groups of staff nurses without master's degrees (Staff+CEN, n=32; Staff non-certified, n=19) were drawn matched to the masterÆs-prepared respondents based on certification, years of emergency nursing experience, and hours per week in clinical practice. All NP respondents (NP, n=5; none master's prepared), and all respondents who identified themselves as CNSs, despite not having a master's degree (ôCNS,ö n=10), were treated as freestanding groups.

Instrument: The RDS survey (190 items) had established validity as a task inventory of emergency nursing practice at a competent level.

Analysis: "Group" was the independent variable. Each survey item was a dependent variable. Practice differences between groups were determined by Analysis of Covariance with post hoc comparison of least squares means (a=0.05). Hours per week and experience were covariates.

Results: For 41 of 190 items (21.6%) on the task frequency scale, a significant effect due to "Group" was found. 1) The NPs performed primary care activities significantly more often and critical care activities significantly less often than all other groups. The master's+CEN group performed 19 critical care, toxicological, mental health and crisis intervention activities significantly more often than at least two other groups, and 12 of the 19 activities significantly more often than at least three other groups. 3) No practice differences were found between the two staff nurse groups.

Conclusions: 1) As of 1990, NPs in emergency nursing and master's-prepared CENs had distinct patterns of practice from other emergency nurses, and from each other. 2) Results for the master's-prepared CENs were consistent with the Emergency CNS Guidelines, and afford limited validation of those Guidelines. 3) Further study is necessary to determine whether an advanced level of certification in Emergency Nursing is warranted. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvanced Emergency Nursing Practice: Preliminary Role-Delineationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162606-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Advanced Emergency Nursing Practice: Preliminary Role-Delineation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Parshall, Mark B.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Despite the fact that the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) has described advanced practice roles as underdeveloped and underutilized in emergency nursing, no data-based study of the emergency Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) role has ever been published. The few studies on the emergency Nurse Practitioner (NP) role are limited by sample size and design. Using the Emergency CNS Guidelines (ENA) and emergency NP literature as a conceptual framework, this study posed two questions: 1) What elements of clinical practice differentiate between advanced and basic emergency nursing practice? and 2) What differentiates between the roles of NP and CNS in emergency nursing?<br/><br/>Design and Study Sample: A secondary analysis of data from the 1990 Emergency Nursing Role Delineation Study (RDS; N=1011) was conducted. The secondary analysis sample (N=117) included all master's-prepared respondents (n=51), divided into two groups based on certification in emergency nursing (Master's+CEN, n=32; Master's non-certified, n=19). Two comparison groups of staff nurses without master's degrees (Staff+CEN, n=32; Staff non-certified, n=19) were drawn matched to the masterÆs-prepared respondents based on certification, years of emergency nursing experience, and hours per week in clinical practice. All NP respondents (NP, n=5; none master's prepared), and all respondents who identified themselves as CNSs, despite not having a master's degree (ôCNS,ö n=10), were treated as freestanding groups.<br/><br/>Instrument: The RDS survey (190 items) had established validity as a task inventory of emergency nursing practice at a competent level.<br/><br/>Analysis: "Group" was the independent variable. Each survey item was a dependent variable. Practice differences between groups were determined by Analysis of Covariance with post hoc comparison of least squares means (a=0.05). Hours per week and experience were covariates.<br/><br/>Results: For 41 of 190 items (21.6%) on the task frequency scale, a significant effect due to "Group" was found. 1) The NPs performed primary care activities significantly more often and critical care activities significantly less often than all other groups. The master's+CEN group performed 19 critical care, toxicological, mental health and crisis intervention activities significantly more often than at least two other groups, and 12 of the 19 activities significantly more often than at least three other groups. 3) No practice differences were found between the two staff nurse groups.<br/><br/>Conclusions: 1) As of 1990, NPs in emergency nursing and master's-prepared CENs had distinct patterns of practice from other emergency nurses, and from each other. 2) Results for the master's-prepared CENs were consistent with the Emergency CNS Guidelines, and afford limited validation of those Guidelines. 3) Further study is necessary to determine whether an advanced level of certification in Emergency Nursing is warranted. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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