Does Emergency Nursing Care of an Intoxicated Trauma Patient Take More Nursing Time Than the Care for a Nonintoxicated Trauma Patient?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162608
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Does Emergency Nursing Care of an Intoxicated Trauma Patient Take More Nursing Time Than the Care for a Nonintoxicated Trauma Patient?
Abstract:
Does Emergency Nursing Care of an Intoxicated Trauma Patient Take More Nursing Time Than the Care for a Nonintoxicated Trauma Patient?
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1995
Author:Seguin, Debra A.
P.I. Institution Name:Grace Hospital
Contact Address:6071 W. Outer Drive, Detroit, MI, 48235, USA
Purpose: To determine whether intoxicated patients with trauma require more nursing care time in the emergency department than do non-intoxicated patients with trauma.

Design, Setting and Sample: This observational study was conducted at a regional Level I trauma center over a 10 week period. A convenience sample of 70 adult victims of trauma were entered into the study during selected shifts that included days, evenings and nights, as well as weekdays and weekends.

Methods: Each patient was observed during their entire ED stay and the performance of all nursing procedures were timed using a stopwatch. Two registered nurse colleagues tested the reliability and validity of the observation and timing. Following patient discharge, emergency records were reviewed for demographic data, blood alcohol level (BAL; in milligrams per deciliter), Injury Severity Scale score, and Abbreviated Injury Scale score. For the purpose of this study, intoxication was defined as a BAL equal to or greater than 100 mg/dl and non-intoxication as a BAL < 99 mg/dl.

Results: No significant difference in total nursing time was found between patients with trauma in the intoxicated group (mean +/- SD = 51 +/- 26.5 min.) versus the non-intoxicated group (44.4 +/- 17.9 min.). However, there was a significant difference in total nursing time for the intoxicated versus non-intoxicated male patients (mean = 51 vs 39 min. respectively, p=.04). For each of the following procedures the mean nursing time was significantly longer in the intoxicated male group compared to the non-intoxicated male group: assisting with endotracheal intubation, applying restraints, IV line insertion, placement of a Foley catheter, and assisting with a diagnostic peritoneal lavage. There was no significant different in total nursing time between intoxicated versus non-intoxicated female groups, nor for any specific procedures.

Conclusions: Alcohol intoxication has been shown to include a large portion of trauma population seen in this country's trauma centers. For some procedures, intoxicated male patients with trauma require more ED nursing time and resources than do non-intoxicated male trauma patients. In planning care for patients with trauma, ED managers and nurses need to allocate more time for the care of the male intoxicated patient with trauma. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDoes Emergency Nursing Care of an Intoxicated Trauma Patient Take More Nursing Time Than the Care for a Nonintoxicated Trauma Patient?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162608-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Does Emergency Nursing Care of an Intoxicated Trauma Patient Take More Nursing Time Than the Care for a Nonintoxicated Trauma Patient?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Seguin, Debra A.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Grace Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6071 W. Outer Drive, Detroit, MI, 48235, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To determine whether intoxicated patients with trauma require more nursing care time in the emergency department than do non-intoxicated patients with trauma.<br/><br/>Design, Setting and Sample: This observational study was conducted at a regional Level I trauma center over a 10 week period. A convenience sample of 70 adult victims of trauma were entered into the study during selected shifts that included days, evenings and nights, as well as weekdays and weekends.<br/><br/>Methods: Each patient was observed during their entire ED stay and the performance of all nursing procedures were timed using a stopwatch. Two registered nurse colleagues tested the reliability and validity of the observation and timing. Following patient discharge, emergency records were reviewed for demographic data, blood alcohol level (BAL; in milligrams per deciliter), Injury Severity Scale score, and Abbreviated Injury Scale score. For the purpose of this study, intoxication was defined as a BAL equal to or greater than 100 mg/dl and non-intoxication as a BAL &lt; 99 mg/dl.<br/><br/>Results: No significant difference in total nursing time was found between patients with trauma in the intoxicated group (mean +/- SD = 51 +/- 26.5 min.) versus the non-intoxicated group (44.4 +/- 17.9 min.). However, there was a significant difference in total nursing time for the intoxicated versus non-intoxicated male patients (mean = 51 vs 39 min. respectively, p=.04). For each of the following procedures the mean nursing time was significantly longer in the intoxicated male group compared to the non-intoxicated male group: assisting with endotracheal intubation, applying restraints, IV line insertion, placement of a Foley catheter, and assisting with a diagnostic peritoneal lavage. There was no significant different in total nursing time between intoxicated versus non-intoxicated female groups, nor for any specific procedures.<br/><br/> Conclusions: Alcohol intoxication has been shown to include a large portion of trauma population seen in this country's trauma centers. For some procedures, intoxicated male patients with trauma require more ED nursing time and resources than do non-intoxicated male trauma patients. In planning care for patients with trauma, ED managers and nurses need to allocate more time for the care of the male intoxicated patient with trauma. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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