2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162609
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of Methods to Reduce Rever in Young Children
Abstract:
A Comparison of Methods to Reduce Rever in Young Children
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1995
Author:Sharber, J.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Contact Address:, Tucson, AZ, USA
The purpose of this clinical study was to examine the effectiveness of and discomfort associated with tepid sponge baths as a cooling measure for febrile pediatric patients. The patients were selected from the Urgent Care (UC) or Emergency Department (ED) of a large southwestern hospital. Twenty patients with a fever greater than or equal of 38.9 degrees C participated; the children's ages ranged from 5 to 58 months. The participants were randomly assigned to two groups: the first group received acetaminophen alone, the second group received acetaminophen plus a 15-minute tepid sponge bath 30 minutes after the acetaminophen dose. All patients received a 15 mg/kg dose of acetaminophen. Tympanic temperature was measured at 30 minute intervals throughout the two hour observation time. The patients were observed for objective signs of discomfort at 15 intervals throughout the study period and at five minute intervals during the bathing period. Signs of discomfort included crying, shivering, and "goosebumps." The results of the study demonstrated no significant difference between the two treatment groups in overall temperature change at the end of two hours. The children who received a tepid sponge bath cooled more quickly during the first hour; however, discomfort scores for the sponge bath group were significantly higher during the bathing period compared to children who were not bathed. It was concluded that tepid sponge baths were time-consuming for ED and UC staff to perform, and significantly uncomfortable for the children, but did not add significantly to the fever reduction achieved by antipyretic medication alone. Therefore, tepid sponge baths need not be a routine intervention for febrile children in the ED or UC. Instead, nursing care should focus on assuring that the child received an adequate dose of an antipyretic, is adequately hydrated, and that the parents receive education regarding childhood fever and fever management. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of Methods to Reduce Rever in Young Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162609-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparison of Methods to Reduce Rever in Young Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sharber, J.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Tucson, AZ, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">res@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this clinical study was to examine the effectiveness of and discomfort associated with tepid sponge baths as a cooling measure for febrile pediatric patients. The patients were selected from the Urgent Care (UC) or Emergency Department (ED) of a large southwestern hospital. Twenty patients with a fever greater than or equal of 38.9 degrees C participated; the children's ages ranged from 5 to 58 months. The participants were randomly assigned to two groups: the first group received acetaminophen alone, the second group received acetaminophen plus a 15-minute tepid sponge bath 30 minutes after the acetaminophen dose. All patients received a 15 mg/kg dose of acetaminophen. Tympanic temperature was measured at 30 minute intervals throughout the two hour observation time. The patients were observed for objective signs of discomfort at 15 intervals throughout the study period and at five minute intervals during the bathing period. Signs of discomfort included crying, shivering, and &quot;goosebumps.&quot; The results of the study demonstrated no significant difference between the two treatment groups in overall temperature change at the end of two hours. The children who received a tepid sponge bath cooled more quickly during the first hour; however, discomfort scores for the sponge bath group were significantly higher during the bathing period compared to children who were not bathed. It was concluded that tepid sponge baths were time-consuming for ED and UC staff to perform, and significantly uncomfortable for the children, but did not add significantly to the fever reduction achieved by antipyretic medication alone. Therefore, tepid sponge baths need not be a routine intervention for febrile children in the ED or UC. Instead, nursing care should focus on assuring that the child received an adequate dose of an antipyretic, is adequately hydrated, and that the parents receive education regarding childhood fever and fever management. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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