Primary Blast Injury to the Tympanic Membrane is Not a Predictor of Occult Pulmonary Primary Blast Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162612
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Primary Blast Injury to the Tympanic Membrane is Not a Predictor of Occult Pulmonary Primary Blast Injury
Abstract:
Primary Blast Injury to the Tympanic Membrane is Not a Predictor of Occult Pulmonary Primary Blast Injury
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Yanir, , Abramovich
Contact Address:Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Schoenbrun Academic, School for Nurses, 17 Henrieta Zsold St., Code: 64924, Tel-Aviv, Jaffo
Contact Telephone:Israel
Co-Authors:Dan Leibovici, Mirit Shiloah, Michael Stein
Purpose: To assess the significance of isolated eardrum perforation as an indicator of increased susceptibility for blast lung injury. If significance is found, an otoscopy examination could be used routinely among victims of explosions, to rule out blast lung injury.

Design: Concurrent study.

Setting/Sample: This study was conducted at 17 level I (6) and level II (11) urban trauma centers throughout Israel to which the survivors of open-air explosions were evacuated. There were 646 individuals from 11 explosion incidents that arrived at 17 emergency departments between April 1994 and March 1996.

Methodology: All 646 victims were examined otoscopically by ear, nose and throat specialists. All 646 patients with eardrum perforation were hospitalized for at least 24 hours of observation. Injury Severity Score (ISS), Revised Trauma Score (RTS), and final outcome were compared between these patients and patients with other blast injuries. A team of physicians and nurses collected the data. Data were collected from the medical record of each patient.

Results: Of the 646 patients sustained who sustained open-air explosion injuries, 193 suffered primary blast injuries (30%). 142 suffered isolated eardrum perforation, 18 had isolated pulmonary blast injury, 31 had combined ottic and pulmonary injuries and 2 had intestinal blast injury as well. No patient initially presenting with isolated eardrum perforation developed signs of blast lung injury. Median ISS was 2 among victims with isolated eardrum perforation and 26 among victims with pulmonary blast injury (p<0.0000.1). RTS>10 was found in 96% of the victims with isolated eardrum perforation and in 60% of those who sustained other blast injuries p<0.00001.

Conclusions: Isolated eardrum perforation in victims of explosions in an open-air scenario is not a specific marker for blast lung injury. If physical examination and chest X-ray are normal, the victim can be discharged from the emergency department following a short observation period with discharge instructions. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrimary Blast Injury to the Tympanic Membrane is Not a Predictor of Occult Pulmonary Primary Blast Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162612-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Primary Blast Injury to the Tympanic Membrane is Not a Predictor of Occult Pulmonary Primary Blast Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yanir, , Abramovich</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Schoenbrun Academic, School for Nurses, 17 Henrieta Zsold St., Code: 64924, Tel-Aviv, Jaffo</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">Israel</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dan Leibovici, Mirit Shiloah, Michael Stein</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To assess the significance of isolated eardrum perforation as an indicator of increased susceptibility for blast lung injury. If significance is found, an otoscopy examination could be used routinely among victims of explosions, to rule out blast lung injury.<br/><br/>Design: Concurrent study.<br/><br/>Setting/Sample: This study was conducted at 17 level I (6) and level II (11) urban trauma centers throughout Israel to which the survivors of open-air explosions were evacuated. There were 646 individuals from 11 explosion incidents that arrived at 17 emergency departments between April 1994 and March 1996.<br/><br/>Methodology: All 646 victims were examined otoscopically by ear, nose and throat specialists. All 646 patients with eardrum perforation were hospitalized for at least 24 hours of observation. Injury Severity Score (ISS), Revised Trauma Score (RTS), and final outcome were compared between these patients and patients with other blast injuries. A team of physicians and nurses collected the data. Data were collected from the medical record of each patient.<br/><br/>Results: Of the 646 patients sustained who sustained open-air explosion injuries, 193 suffered primary blast injuries (30%). 142 suffered isolated eardrum perforation, 18 had isolated pulmonary blast injury, 31 had combined ottic and pulmonary injuries and 2 had intestinal blast injury as well. No patient initially presenting with isolated eardrum perforation developed signs of blast lung injury. Median ISS was 2 among victims with isolated eardrum perforation and 26 among victims with pulmonary blast injury (p&lt;0.0000.1). RTS&gt;10 was found in 96% of the victims with isolated eardrum perforation and in 60% of those who sustained other blast injuries p&lt;0.00001.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Isolated eardrum perforation in victims of explosions in an open-air scenario is not a specific marker for blast lung injury. If physical examination and chest X-ray are normal, the victim can be discharged from the emergency department following a short observation period with discharge instructions. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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