Implementation of a School Based Injury Prevention Program with Volunteer Support by Emergency Department Staff

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162616
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of a School Based Injury Prevention Program with Volunteer Support by Emergency Department Staff
Abstract:
Implementation of a School Based Injury Prevention Program with Volunteer Support by Emergency Department Staff
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Theresa, , Cromling
Contact Address:Duke University Medical Center, Erwin Road, Durham, NC, 27710
Contact Telephone:USA
Clinical Topic: The #1 health risk for children 14 and under is unintentional injuries. Each year, injuries to this age group result in 246,000 hospitalizations, nearly 8,700,000 emergency department visits, and more than 11,000,000 visits to physiciansÆ offices. Prevention is an essential component of emergency nursing practice. Risk Watch is a comprehensive injury prevention curriculum designed to be implemented as a community initiative where emergency department (ED) professionals work with teachers to provide children with important safety messages.

Implementation: In 1995, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and Lowe's Home Safety Council partnered to design a safety curriculum that included more than fire safety. Over the next three years, injury prevention experts and organizations across North America collaborated to develop Risk Watch. North Carolina schools received their supplies for Risk Watch through combined funds from The Duke Endowment, local fundraisers, and individual school funds.
The intent of this project was to involve ED professionals in injury prevention teaching outside the hospital and to give area school children positive role models from their communities. The project implementation included: (1) polling ED nurses and physicians regarding their desire to be involved, (2) identifying an ED liaison for the classroom teachers, and (3) developing activities to enhance Risk Watch objectives for use by ED staff in classroom presentations about specific risk areas, such as motor vehicle, pedestrian, water, firearm and bike safety, burns and fire, poisoning and choking.

Outcomes: Teachers and students enthusiastically received the ED staff and the Risk Watch curriculum. Children were attentive, asked appropriate questions during the lessons and retained safety information to take home. The eagerness of the ED staff to share experiences and expertise on injury prevention was evidenced by the involvement of almost 50% of our RN staff. The community involvement also enhanced staff evaluations and advancements. Over the next three years, the evaluation of Risk Watch will track changes in childrenÆs attitudes, behaviors and beliefs.

Recommendations: At present, nurses participate in the classrooms during their personal time. It is our hope that hospital administration will support Risk Watch as a valuable outreach program worthy of our staffÆs work time. As all of the public elementary and middle schools, many private/charter schools, and preschools in Durham County become involved with Risk Watch, the need may arise to have several ED liaisons, a central office with a staff specialist, or an "adopt a school" program. This additional support will assure our present level of community involvement. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of a School Based Injury Prevention Program with Volunteer Support by Emergency Department Staffen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162616-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implementation of a School Based Injury Prevention Program with Volunteer Support by Emergency Department Staff</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Theresa, , Cromling</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Duke University Medical Center, Erwin Road, Durham, NC, 27710</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: The #1 health risk for children 14 and under is unintentional injuries. Each year, injuries to this age group result in 246,000 hospitalizations, nearly 8,700,000 emergency department visits, and more than 11,000,000 visits to physicians&AElig; offices. Prevention is an essential component of emergency nursing practice. Risk Watch is a comprehensive injury prevention curriculum designed to be implemented as a community initiative where emergency department (ED) professionals work with teachers to provide children with important safety messages.<br/><br/>Implementation: In 1995, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and Lowe's Home Safety Council partnered to design a safety curriculum that included more than fire safety. Over the next three years, injury prevention experts and organizations across North America collaborated to develop Risk Watch. North Carolina schools received their supplies for Risk Watch through combined funds from The Duke Endowment, local fundraisers, and individual school funds.<br/>The intent of this project was to involve ED professionals in injury prevention teaching outside the hospital and to give area school children positive role models from their communities. The project implementation included: (1) polling ED nurses and physicians regarding their desire to be involved, (2) identifying an ED liaison for the classroom teachers, and (3) developing activities to enhance Risk Watch objectives for use by ED staff in classroom presentations about specific risk areas, such as motor vehicle, pedestrian, water, firearm and bike safety, burns and fire, poisoning and choking.<br/><br/>Outcomes: Teachers and students enthusiastically received the ED staff and the Risk Watch curriculum. Children were attentive, asked appropriate questions during the lessons and retained safety information to take home. The eagerness of the ED staff to share experiences and expertise on injury prevention was evidenced by the involvement of almost 50% of our RN staff. The community involvement also enhanced staff evaluations and advancements. Over the next three years, the evaluation of Risk Watch will track changes in children&AElig;s attitudes, behaviors and beliefs.<br/><br/>Recommendations: At present, nurses participate in the classrooms during their personal time. It is our hope that hospital administration will support Risk Watch as a valuable outreach program worthy of our staff&AElig;s work time. As all of the public elementary and middle schools, many private/charter schools, and preschools in Durham County become involved with Risk Watch, the need may arise to have several ED liaisons, a central office with a staff specialist, or an &quot;adopt a school&quot; program. This additional support will assure our present level of community involvement. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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