2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162619
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Nina, , Fielden
Contact Address:The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, E19, Cleveland, OH, 44195
Contact Telephone:USA
Clinical Topic: The prevalence of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among adults with respiratory symptoms is estimated to be 28% in an emergency department (ED) setting with approximately 20% of these patients requiring hospitalization. Mortality ranges from 2% to 30% among hospitalized patients. Investigations showed that early specific interventions, such as the ordering of cultures and the initiation of IV antibiotics in the ED, could reduce mortality, length of stay, and cost of care.

Implementation: The Pneumonia Project from the Ohio Peer Review System recommended the early administration of antibiotic therapy for CAP, within 4 hours of presentation to the ED. Other quality improvement initiatives included the development of a critical care path. This poster describes the process of managing the patient population of CAP in the ED utilizing a clinical pathway and antibiotic algorithm. Guidelines from the American Thoracic Society for interventions in patients with CAP are described, including triage assessment for risk factors and signs and symptoms, and time to treatment in the ED for administration of antibiotics. Charts were reviewed from the first two quarters of 1997. Specific interventions, such as ordering of cultures and antibiotics in the ED, were compared. The results were shared with the physicians and nurses during the third quarter. Charts were reviewed from the last quarter of 1997 to note any improvement in ED interventions.

Outcomes: Fifty-two percent of the time, antibiotics were ordered in the ED in the first half of the year, with an improvement to 85% by the end of the year. However, administration of antibiotics in the ED within 4 hours of the patient's presentation to the ED decreased from 79% to 67% by the end of the year. Cultures were ordered 73% of the time in the first half of the year and 72% of the time in the last quarter of the year.

Recommendations: Further education of the nursing staff was needed to emphasize the importance of early initiation of antibiotics ordered in the ED prior to the patient's admission to the hospital. Use of the clinical pathway was also re-emphasized. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTreatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162619-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nina, , Fielden</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, E19, Cleveland, OH, 44195</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: The prevalence of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among adults with respiratory symptoms is estimated to be 28% in an emergency department (ED) setting with approximately 20% of these patients requiring hospitalization. Mortality ranges from 2% to 30% among hospitalized patients. Investigations showed that early specific interventions, such as the ordering of cultures and the initiation of IV antibiotics in the ED, could reduce mortality, length of stay, and cost of care.<br/><br/>Implementation: The Pneumonia Project from the Ohio Peer Review System recommended the early administration of antibiotic therapy for CAP, within 4 hours of presentation to the ED. Other quality improvement initiatives included the development of a critical care path. This poster describes the process of managing the patient population of CAP in the ED utilizing a clinical pathway and antibiotic algorithm. Guidelines from the American Thoracic Society for interventions in patients with CAP are described, including triage assessment for risk factors and signs and symptoms, and time to treatment in the ED for administration of antibiotics. Charts were reviewed from the first two quarters of 1997. Specific interventions, such as ordering of cultures and antibiotics in the ED, were compared. The results were shared with the physicians and nurses during the third quarter. Charts were reviewed from the last quarter of 1997 to note any improvement in ED interventions.<br/><br/>Outcomes: Fifty-two percent of the time, antibiotics were ordered in the ED in the first half of the year, with an improvement to 85% by the end of the year. However, administration of antibiotics in the ED within 4 hours of the patient's presentation to the ED decreased from 79% to 67% by the end of the year. Cultures were ordered 73% of the time in the first half of the year and 72% of the time in the last quarter of the year.<br/><br/>Recommendations: Further education of the nursing staff was needed to emphasize the importance of early initiation of antibiotics ordered in the ED prior to the patient's admission to the hospital. Use of the clinical pathway was also re-emphasized. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.