Prevention of Infant Walker Injuries: A Successful Community-Based Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162620
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevention of Infant Walker Injuries: A Successful Community-Based Intervention
Abstract:
Prevention of Infant Walker Injuries: A Successful Community-Based Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Tener, , GoodwinVeenema
Contact Address:University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY, 14642
Contact Telephone:USA
Co-Authors:Gregory P. Connors, Charles M. Callahan, Carol A. Kavanaugh, John Ricci
Purpose: Infant walkers are a well-recognized health hazard and are associated with head injuries, burns and poisonings. Despite national educational efforts to discourage infant walker use, these injuries remain frequent. To reduce the frequency of infant walker injuries in our community, a combination of educational efforts and the destruction of infant walkers were initiated.

Design: A cohort study with historical control was used.

Setting/Sample: Eligible patients included all children <18 months with emergency department records bearing ICD-9 codes of 880.9 (falls down stairs) associated with infant walkers treated during the appropriate time periods.

Methodology: Brochures, posters and information sheets were developed and distributed to all local emergency departments, pediatric, family practice, and OB/GYN offices and clinics in Rochester, NY. These materials explained the dangers of walker use and recommended safer alternatives. Informational sessions were held at hospitals, day care centers, and nursery schools. The county health department mailed the brochure to new parents. An educational press conference attracted television, radio and newspaper coverage. Three baby stores co-sponsored a "walker round-up" at which walkers were collected and destroyed in return for prizes. These stores stopped sale of infant walkers. To determine the effects of the intervention, the number of children presenting to the area's only two pediatric emergency departments for "falls down stairs while in infant walkers" over the 2 years prior to the intervention were compared with the number the year following the interventions. Falls were identified because they represent 90% of all infant walker-related injuries. Annual injury rates were compared using the Students' t-test. The difference was considered significant for p <.05.

Results: Annual patient census for the two pediatric emergency departments remained approximately 28,000 during the entire period. During the 2 years prior to the intervention, 131 children (52.4/year) with walker-associated injuries were seen in the two emergency departments. The year following the intervention, 38 children were seen. This represents an annual reduction of 27.5%.

Conclusions: Walker-related injuries remain a significant problem. The study intervention included a multi-faceted educational campaign and a reduction in the availability of infant walkers. A significant reduction in walker-related injuries was seen. Emergency providers can play a vital role in educating patients about pediatric public health issues. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevention of Infant Walker Injuries: A Successful Community-Based Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162620-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prevention of Infant Walker Injuries: A Successful Community-Based Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tener, , GoodwinVeenema</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY, 14642</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gregory P. Connors, Charles M. Callahan, Carol A. Kavanaugh, John Ricci</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Infant walkers are a well-recognized health hazard and are associated with head injuries, burns and poisonings. Despite national educational efforts to discourage infant walker use, these injuries remain frequent. To reduce the frequency of infant walker injuries in our community, a combination of educational efforts and the destruction of infant walkers were initiated.<br/><br/>Design: A cohort study with historical control was used.<br/><br/>Setting/Sample: Eligible patients included all children &lt;18 months with emergency department records bearing ICD-9 codes of 880.9 (falls down stairs) associated with infant walkers treated during the appropriate time periods.<br/><br/>Methodology: Brochures, posters and information sheets were developed and distributed to all local emergency departments, pediatric, family practice, and OB/GYN offices and clinics in Rochester, NY. These materials explained the dangers of walker use and recommended safer alternatives. Informational sessions were held at hospitals, day care centers, and nursery schools. The county health department mailed the brochure to new parents. An educational press conference attracted television, radio and newspaper coverage. Three baby stores co-sponsored a &quot;walker round-up&quot; at which walkers were collected and destroyed in return for prizes. These stores stopped sale of infant walkers. To determine the effects of the intervention, the number of children presenting to the area's only two pediatric emergency departments for &quot;falls down stairs while in infant walkers&quot; over the 2 years prior to the intervention were compared with the number the year following the interventions. Falls were identified because they represent 90% of all infant walker-related injuries. Annual injury rates were compared using the Students' t-test. The difference was considered significant for p &lt;.05.<br/><br/>Results: Annual patient census for the two pediatric emergency departments remained approximately 28,000 during the entire period. During the 2 years prior to the intervention, 131 children (52.4/year) with walker-associated injuries were seen in the two emergency departments. The year following the intervention, 38 children were seen. This represents an annual reduction of 27.5%.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Walker-related injuries remain a significant problem. The study intervention included a multi-faceted educational campaign and a reduction in the availability of infant walkers. A significant reduction in walker-related injuries was seen. Emergency providers can play a vital role in educating patients about pediatric public health issues. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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