2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162624
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Review of the First Five Years of Rape Trauma Service in Reykjavik, Iceland
Abstract:
Review of the First Five Years of Rape Trauma Service in Reykjavik, Iceland
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Eyrun, , Jonsdottir
Contact Address:Emergency Hospital, City Hospital, Reykjavik, v/Slettuveg, 108 Reykjavik
Contact Telephone:Iceland
Co-Authors:Gudrun Agnarsdottir, Anna Maria Thordardottir
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze visits to the Rape Trauma Service (RTS) in Iceland. Information about the time of visits per hour of day, week, and month, age distribution, and other domestic factors will be used for injury prevention programs in schools and the community.

A coordinated, multidisciplinary, professional sexual assault service has been offered at the emergency department since March 1993. Its intent is to minimize acute trauma and reduce the post-traumatic effects of sexual assault. The service is provided around the clock by specially trained nurses, physicians, social workers and lawyers. It is free of charge, offering support, care and advice, together with medical and forensic examination and treatment as well as regular follow-up, including post-traumatic support by psychologists.

Design: A retrospective descriptive design was used.

Setting/Sample: This study was conducted in a 23-bed emergency department with 40,000 visits per year, located in an urban hospital in Iceland. The medical records of all patients (n=386) that came to the RTS between March 1993 to February 1999 were included, with no exclusions.

Methodology: Information was collected, anonymously, from standardized medical questionnaires developed by the RTS team in coordination with the national police force and justice system. The original questionnaire model was developed by a similar RTS in Norway and has been modified and adapted to Icelandic law and values. The questionnaires consist of yes/no questions answered by the victim, and objective data collected by the multidisciplinary professional sexual assault team.

Results: During the first five years, 386 individuals, mostly women, sought help at the RTS. More than 50% were younger than 25 years. Most attendance was over weekends (n=199, 52%). Rape was the most common complaint. Sexual assault was often connected with partying and use of alcohol and/or drugs. The most common site of assault was in the home of either assailant or victim. The suspected assailant was known to the victim in a majority of cases (n=221, 57%). Physical injuries were usually minor (AIS<2, n=180, 47%), being severe n a few cases (AIS>2, n=19, 5%). More than half of the individuals came to the RTS within 12 hours of the assault, and about 50% decided to press charges following the event.

Conclusions: Detailed but confidential documentation by the RTS has provided new information about rape and other sexual assaults in Iceland. The information has already been used for education and prevention in schools and the community. This comprehensive support system has already served as a model for other medical services and RTSs in other countries. Plans are in progress to extend this service in Iceland for victims of violence in general. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReview of the First Five Years of Rape Trauma Service in Reykjavik, Icelanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162624-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Review of the First Five Years of Rape Trauma Service in Reykjavik, Iceland</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Eyrun, , Jonsdottir</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Emergency Hospital, City Hospital, Reykjavik, v/Slettuveg, 108 Reykjavik</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">Iceland</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gudrun Agnarsdottir, Anna Maria Thordardottir</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze visits to the Rape Trauma Service (RTS) in Iceland. Information about the time of visits per hour of day, week, and month, age distribution, and other domestic factors will be used for injury prevention programs in schools and the community.<br/><br/>A coordinated, multidisciplinary, professional sexual assault service has been offered at the emergency department since March 1993. Its intent is to minimize acute trauma and reduce the post-traumatic effects of sexual assault. The service is provided around the clock by specially trained nurses, physicians, social workers and lawyers. It is free of charge, offering support, care and advice, together with medical and forensic examination and treatment as well as regular follow-up, including post-traumatic support by psychologists.<br/><br/>Design: A retrospective descriptive design was used.<br/><br/>Setting/Sample: This study was conducted in a 23-bed emergency department with 40,000 visits per year, located in an urban hospital in Iceland. The medical records of all patients (n=386) that came to the RTS between March 1993 to February 1999 were included, with no exclusions.<br/><br/>Methodology: Information was collected, anonymously, from standardized medical questionnaires developed by the RTS team in coordination with the national police force and justice system. The original questionnaire model was developed by a similar RTS in Norway and has been modified and adapted to Icelandic law and values. The questionnaires consist of yes/no questions answered by the victim, and objective data collected by the multidisciplinary professional sexual assault team.<br/><br/>Results: During the first five years, 386 individuals, mostly women, sought help at the RTS. More than 50% were younger than 25 years. Most attendance was over weekends (n=199, 52%). Rape was the most common complaint. Sexual assault was often connected with partying and use of alcohol and/or drugs. The most common site of assault was in the home of either assailant or victim. The suspected assailant was known to the victim in a majority of cases (n=221, 57%). Physical injuries were usually minor (AIS&lt;2, n=180, 47%), being severe n a few cases (AIS&gt;2, n=19, 5%). More than half of the individuals came to the RTS within 12 hours of the assault, and about 50% decided to press charges following the event.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Detailed but confidential documentation by the RTS has provided new information about rape and other sexual assaults in Iceland. The information has already been used for education and prevention in schools and the community. This comprehensive support system has already served as a model for other medical services and RTSs in other countries. Plans are in progress to extend this service in Iceland for victims of violence in general. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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