2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162625
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Standardized Treatment for Adult Asthma on Quality of Life
Abstract:
The Effects of Standardized Treatment for Adult Asthma on Quality of Life
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Claudia, , Jorgenson
Contact Address:Lutheran General Hospital, 1775 Dempster Street, Park Ridge, IL, 60068
Co-Authors:Patti Ludwig-Beymer
Purpose: Asthma accounts for 4 million medical office visits and 5% of all emergency department (ED) visits in the United States. Morbidity and mortality related to asthma continue to rise. Possible reasons for these increases include under-estimation of asthma severity, under-treatment of the disease, a patient's failure to recognize symptoms, and poor compliance with medical regime. Successful management of asthma depends on strategies aimed at patient education, objective lung function measurement, environmental control, and comprehensive pharmacologic therapy. Orem's self-care model emphasizes an individualÆs personal responsibility to his own health and well-being and views health education and prevention as key nursing interventions.

Design: This research examined how a standardized care plan for asthma treatment, a patient education plan, and home follow-up impact perceived quality of life and need for medical care over time.

Methodology: Between 11/1/96 and 6/30/97, adult patients entering the ED for treatment of acute exacerbation of asthma were given standardized treatment and educational materials with patient-specific discharge instructions. All were asked to participate in the quality of life study, which involved completion of a two-part survey during the ED visit, at six months, and one year. Follow-up by the care manager 10 days after discharge from the ED was attempted for each patient.

The two-part survey consisted of the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) and additional demographic data. AQLQ, developed by Marks, Dunn and Woolcock, is a 20 item survey consisting of four subscales: breathlessness, mood disturbance, social disruption, and concern for health. Larger AQLQ score indicate a more negative impact of asthma on the patient's perceived quality of life, with 0 indicating no impact and 80 indicating the highest degree of impact. Psychometric studies have demonstrated short-term test-retest reliability (correlation coefficient for total scale 0.80), internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.92 and 0.94), and correlation with change of symptom scores and degree of hyper-responsiveness. The scale is also capable of detecting differences between improved and stable subjects.

Sample: Twenty-nine patients, 21% male and 79% female, with a mean age of 35.24 years (SD = 13.55), were enrolled in the study.

Results: This poster presents baseline data. In the four weeks prior to their visit to the ED, 70 days were missed from school or work, 31 visits or phone calls were made to primary physicians, and 11 ED visits occurred due to asthma. Results of the Purpose: Use of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) among persons living in the United States has continued to increase over the past decade. However, frequency of use of these therapies in the emergency department (ED) setting is unknown. The purpose of this survey study was to explore ED practitioners' personal use of CATs and the recommendation of selected therapies to patients.

Design: An exploratory survey was used to determine ED practitioners' self-use of CATs and their recommendation of selected therapies for patient intervention.

Setting and sample: A sample of staff in 10 EDs located in Virginia, Florida, and Washington, D.C. where the authors had cooperative clinical agreements for graduate student placement was used. An investigator-constructed survey was mailed to nurse managers or nursing specialists who had agreed to participate for distribution to clinical personnel in their departments. Four hundred eighty questionnaires were mailed with 142 returned for a 30% response rat Purpose: Use of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) among persons living in the United States has continued to increase over the past decade. However, frequency of use of these therapies in the emergency department (ED) setting is unknown. The purpose of this survey study was to explore ED practitioners' personal use of CATs and the recommendation of selected therapies to patients.

Design: An exploratory survey was used to determine ED practitioners' self-use of CATs and their recommendation of selected therapies for patient intervention.

Setting and sample: A sample of staff in 10 EDs located in Virginia, Florida, and Washington, D.C. where the authors had cooperative clinical agreements for graduate student placement was used. An investigator-constructed survey was mailed to nurse managers or nursing specialists who had agreed to participate for distribution to clinical personnel in their departments. Four hundred eighty questionnaires were mailed with 142 returned for a 30% response rat "Quality of Life Survey" indicated that the patients perceived their quality of life to be impacted by their asthma. Six-month follow-up surveys are currently being analyzed. This research will continue to track the panel of 29 patients to begin to identify how quality of life has changed over time. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Standardized Treatment for Adult Asthma on Quality of Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162625-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Standardized Treatment for Adult Asthma on Quality of Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Claudia, , Jorgenson</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Lutheran General Hospital, 1775 Dempster Street, Park Ridge, IL, 60068</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patti Ludwig-Beymer</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Asthma accounts for 4 million medical office visits and 5% of all emergency department (ED) visits in the United States. Morbidity and mortality related to asthma continue to rise. Possible reasons for these increases include under-estimation of asthma severity, under-treatment of the disease, a patient's failure to recognize symptoms, and poor compliance with medical regime. Successful management of asthma depends on strategies aimed at patient education, objective lung function measurement, environmental control, and comprehensive pharmacologic therapy. Orem's self-care model emphasizes an individual&AElig;s personal responsibility to his own health and well-being and views health education and prevention as key nursing interventions.<br/><br/>Design: This research examined how a standardized care plan for asthma treatment, a patient education plan, and home follow-up impact perceived quality of life and need for medical care over time.<br/><br/>Methodology: Between 11/1/96 and 6/30/97, adult patients entering the ED for treatment of acute exacerbation of asthma were given standardized treatment and educational materials with patient-specific discharge instructions. All were asked to participate in the quality of life study, which involved completion of a two-part survey during the ED visit, at six months, and one year. Follow-up by the care manager 10 days after discharge from the ED was attempted for each patient.<br/><br/>The two-part survey consisted of the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) and additional demographic data. AQLQ, developed by Marks, Dunn and Woolcock, is a 20 item survey consisting of four subscales: breathlessness, mood disturbance, social disruption, and concern for health. Larger AQLQ score indicate a more negative impact of asthma on the patient's perceived quality of life, with 0 indicating no impact and 80 indicating the highest degree of impact. Psychometric studies have demonstrated short-term test-retest reliability (correlation coefficient for total scale 0.80), internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.92 and 0.94), and correlation with change of symptom scores and degree of hyper-responsiveness. The scale is also capable of detecting differences between improved and stable subjects.<br/><br/>Sample: Twenty-nine patients, 21% male and 79% female, with a mean age of 35.24 years (SD = 13.55), were enrolled in the study.<br/><br/>Results: This poster presents baseline data. In the four weeks prior to their visit to the ED, 70 days were missed from school or work, 31 visits or phone calls were made to primary physicians, and 11 ED visits occurred due to asthma. Results of the Purpose: Use of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) among persons living in the United States has continued to increase over the past decade. However, frequency of use of these therapies in the emergency department (ED) setting is unknown. The purpose of this survey study was to explore ED practitioners' personal use of CATs and the recommendation of selected therapies to patients.<br/><br/>Design: An exploratory survey was used to determine ED practitioners' self-use of CATs and their recommendation of selected therapies for patient intervention.<br/><br/>Setting and sample: A sample of staff in 10 EDs located in Virginia, Florida, and Washington, D.C. where the authors had cooperative clinical agreements for graduate student placement was used. An investigator-constructed survey was mailed to nurse managers or nursing specialists who had agreed to participate for distribution to clinical personnel in their departments. Four hundred eighty questionnaires were mailed with 142 returned for a 30% response rat Purpose: Use of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) among persons living in the United States has continued to increase over the past decade. However, frequency of use of these therapies in the emergency department (ED) setting is unknown. The purpose of this survey study was to explore ED practitioners' personal use of CATs and the recommendation of selected therapies to patients.<br/><br/>Design: An exploratory survey was used to determine ED practitioners' self-use of CATs and their recommendation of selected therapies for patient intervention.<br/><br/>Setting and sample: A sample of staff in 10 EDs located in Virginia, Florida, and Washington, D.C. where the authors had cooperative clinical agreements for graduate student placement was used. An investigator-constructed survey was mailed to nurse managers or nursing specialists who had agreed to participate for distribution to clinical personnel in their departments. Four hundred eighty questionnaires were mailed with 142 returned for a 30% response rat &quot;Quality of Life Survey&quot; indicated that the patients perceived their quality of life to be impacted by their asthma. Six-month follow-up surveys are currently being analyzed. This research will continue to track the panel of 29 patients to begin to identify how quality of life has changed over time. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.