2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162631
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining Victims of Sexual Violence Assaults the NursesÆ Core Assumptions
Abstract:
Examining Victims of Sexual Violence Assaults the NursesÆ Core Assumptions
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Margaret, , McEntee
Contact Address:University of Maryland School of Nursing, 655 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD, 21201
Contact Telephone:USA
Co-Authors:Carole B. Kimmell
Purpose: Examining victims of sexual violence may indirectly traumatize Sexual Assault Forensic/Nurse Examiners (SAFE/SANE) and disrupt their beliefs that people are kind and the world is safe and just. The purpose of this study is to identify the influence of sexual assault forensic examinations on these Core Assumptions, as conceptualized by Janoff-Bulman, and the effects on the attitudes of SAFE/SANE nurses toward the world, their lifestyles and relationships.

Setting/Sample: Fifty registered nurses attending the advanced training track of a regional conference for Sexual assault Forensic Examiners were asked to complete questionnaires and 39 returned completed questionnaires. The respondents ranged from ages 23 to 62 years and averaged 19 years in nursing and 2 years as sexual assault examiners.

Methodology: The descriptive study used a two part questionnaire. Part one elicited demographic information. Part two consisted of 3 open-ended questions which asked the nurses to describe specifically how performing forensic examinations on sexual assault victims has influenced their attitudes toward the world, their lifestyles and their relationships with family and others. A total of 174 response statements were grouped according to Janoff-BulmanÆs thematic categories by two experts in traumatic stress disorders with an interrater reliability of .95. The results were then reported as frequency/percents of responses per category of Core Assumptions.

Results: Eighty-five percent (148) of the total 174 responses clearly stated changes in their Core Assumptions. Fifty-five statements (32%) pertaining to world view indicated: The world is not safe (n-31, 18%) and people are not kind (n=24, 14%). Forty-nine statements (28%) indicated that the nurses were more cautious with interactions and fourteen (8%) noted feeling powerlessness to control external events. Twenty-eight statements (16%) reported closer relationships with family and friends with specific emphasis on safety education and caution toward strangers. Two nurses (5%) reported avoiding sexual contact with their spouses after examining victims of exceptionally violent assaults.

Conclusions: Performing forensic examinations may be, in themselves, traumatic events for these SAFE/SANE nurses which affect their attitudes toward the world, their lifestyles and relationships. These findings are consistent with Janoff-Bulman's conceptualization of the influence of traumatic events on Core Assumptions. Emergency nurses and administrators need to acknowledge the risk of indirect trauma. Additionally, SAFE/SANE education and practice must include and utilize resources such as Critical Incident Stress Management to mitigate its consequences. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining Victims of Sexual Violence Assaults the NursesÆ Core Assumptionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162631-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining Victims of Sexual Violence Assaults the Nurses&AElig; Core Assumptions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Margaret, , McEntee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland School of Nursing, 655 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD, 21201</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carole B. Kimmell</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Examining victims of sexual violence may indirectly traumatize Sexual Assault Forensic/Nurse Examiners (SAFE/SANE) and disrupt their beliefs that people are kind and the world is safe and just. The purpose of this study is to identify the influence of sexual assault forensic examinations on these Core Assumptions, as conceptualized by Janoff-Bulman, and the effects on the attitudes of SAFE/SANE nurses toward the world, their lifestyles and relationships.<br/><br/>Setting/Sample: Fifty registered nurses attending the advanced training track of a regional conference for Sexual assault Forensic Examiners were asked to complete questionnaires and 39 returned completed questionnaires. The respondents ranged from ages 23 to 62 years and averaged 19 years in nursing and 2 years as sexual assault examiners.<br/><br/>Methodology: The descriptive study used a two part questionnaire. Part one elicited demographic information. Part two consisted of 3 open-ended questions which asked the nurses to describe specifically how performing forensic examinations on sexual assault victims has influenced their attitudes toward the world, their lifestyles and their relationships with family and others. A total of 174 response statements were grouped according to Janoff-Bulman&AElig;s thematic categories by two experts in traumatic stress disorders with an interrater reliability of .95. The results were then reported as frequency/percents of responses per category of Core Assumptions.<br/><br/>Results: Eighty-five percent (148) of the total 174 responses clearly stated changes in their Core Assumptions. Fifty-five statements (32%) pertaining to world view indicated: The world is not safe (n-31, 18%) and people are not kind (n=24, 14%). Forty-nine statements (28%) indicated that the nurses were more cautious with interactions and fourteen (8%) noted feeling powerlessness to control external events. Twenty-eight statements (16%) reported closer relationships with family and friends with specific emphasis on safety education and caution toward strangers. Two nurses (5%) reported avoiding sexual contact with their spouses after examining victims of exceptionally violent assaults.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Performing forensic examinations may be, in themselves, traumatic events for these SAFE/SANE nurses which affect their attitudes toward the world, their lifestyles and relationships. These findings are consistent with Janoff-Bulman's conceptualization of the influence of traumatic events on Core Assumptions. Emergency nurses and administrators need to acknowledge the risk of indirect trauma. Additionally, SAFE/SANE education and practice must include and utilize resources such as Critical Incident Stress Management to mitigate its consequences. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.