Development and Implementation of a Patient Simulation Laboratory for Teaching Emergency Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162632
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and Implementation of a Patient Simulation Laboratory for Teaching Emergency Nursing
Abstract:
Development and Implementation of a Patient Simulation Laboratory for Teaching Emergency Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Patricia, , Morton
Contact Address:University of Maryland School of Nursing, 655 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD, 21201
Contact Telephone:USA
Clinical Topic: Rapid technological advances, increased levels of patient acuity, escalating numbers of uninsured patients, and pressures for cost containment have placed enormous demands on emergency nurses. To better prepare nurses for the challenge of emergency nursing, this project involved the development and implementation of a patient simulation laboratory in a school of nursing. The purpose of the laboratory is to provide students with a risk free environment to gain the knowledge and skills for emergency nursing practice.

Implementation: Planning and implementation included the following steps: 1) creating a vision of the laboratory; 2) obtaining administrative approval and support; 3) acquiring funding from a private foundation and from alumni donors; 4) securing equipment donations such as defibrillators, cardiac monitors, IV infusion pumps, and pulse oximeters from medical equipment corporations; 5) purchasing additional equipment such as beds, a ventilator, 12 lead EKG machines, mannequins, computers, and software; and 6) integrating simulation as a teaching method in addition to lecture and clinical experiences.

Outcomes: The outcomes of this clinical project included: 1) the creation of a ten bed patient simulation laboratory; 2) opportunities for learning experiences in which the learners are actively engaged in the learning process and receive immediate feedback and reinforcement of learning; 3) a setting where learners are able to make mistakes and refine skills in an atmosphere free of danger, anxiety, censure, or embarrassment; and 4) development of decision-making, problem solving, and psychomotor skills before students experience the reality of the clinical setting.

Recommendations: Recommendations for use of simulation laboratories for teaching include: 1) increased use of simulation as teaching method for students; 2) formation of partnerships between clinical settings and schools of nursing for the purpose of sharing the resources of a simulation laboratory for learning; 3) increased use of simulation as a method for orientation to emergency nursing and as a method to validate competencies; and 4) research to investigate the outcomes of simulation as a teaching method. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and Implementation of a Patient Simulation Laboratory for Teaching Emergency Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162632-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development and Implementation of a Patient Simulation Laboratory for Teaching Emergency Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Patricia, , Morton</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland School of Nursing, 655 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD, 21201</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: Rapid technological advances, increased levels of patient acuity, escalating numbers of uninsured patients, and pressures for cost containment have placed enormous demands on emergency nurses. To better prepare nurses for the challenge of emergency nursing, this project involved the development and implementation of a patient simulation laboratory in a school of nursing. The purpose of the laboratory is to provide students with a risk free environment to gain the knowledge and skills for emergency nursing practice.<br/><br/>Implementation: Planning and implementation included the following steps: 1) creating a vision of the laboratory; 2) obtaining administrative approval and support; 3) acquiring funding from a private foundation and from alumni donors; 4) securing equipment donations such as defibrillators, cardiac monitors, IV infusion pumps, and pulse oximeters from medical equipment corporations; 5) purchasing additional equipment such as beds, a ventilator, 12 lead EKG machines, mannequins, computers, and software; and 6) integrating simulation as a teaching method in addition to lecture and clinical experiences.<br/><br/>Outcomes: The outcomes of this clinical project included: 1) the creation of a ten bed patient simulation laboratory; 2) opportunities for learning experiences in which the learners are actively engaged in the learning process and receive immediate feedback and reinforcement of learning; 3) a setting where learners are able to make mistakes and refine skills in an atmosphere free of danger, anxiety, censure, or embarrassment; and 4) development of decision-making, problem solving, and psychomotor skills before students experience the reality of the clinical setting.<br/><br/>Recommendations: Recommendations for use of simulation laboratories for teaching include: 1) increased use of simulation as teaching method for students; 2) formation of partnerships between clinical settings and schools of nursing for the purpose of sharing the resources of a simulation laboratory for learning; 3) increased use of simulation as a method for orientation to emergency nursing and as a method to validate competencies; and 4) research to investigate the outcomes of simulation as a teaching method. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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