Emergency Department Nurses' and Patients' Estimates of patient Pain: How Close Are They?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162636
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Department Nurses' and Patients' Estimates of patient Pain: How Close Are They?
Abstract:
Emergency Department Nurses' and Patients' Estimates of patient Pain: How Close Are They?
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Kathleen, , Puntillo
Contact Address:Dept. of Physiological Nursing, N611Y, Box 0610, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, 94143
Contact Telephone:USA
Co-Authors:Martha Neighbor, Nel O'Neil
Purpose: Pain is the most frequent reason that patients seek assistance from health care providers. Little is known about the accuracy of emergency department (ED) nurses' assessments of their patients' pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between patientsÆ and nursesÆ pain reports when patients presented to the ED.

Setting: This study was conducted in an ED in a Level I trauma setting in Western United States. The ED manages approximately 200 patients per day.

Sample: A convenience sample of 156 patients who presented to triage seeking health care assistance, and the 27 nurses who performed their initial assessments were included in the sample. A convenience subsample of 44 of the 156 patients was later assessed in the clinical area of the ED by another 27 nurses.

Methodology: A prospective, descriptive design was used to determine differences in pain reports. Patients were asked by a member of the research team to rate their pain at triage and in the clinical area using a horizontal 0 - 10 numerical rating scale (NRS), where 0 = no pain and 10- = worst pain possible. The NRS pain scale has established construct and concurrent validity and test-retest reliability. At each time, the patientÆs nurse, who was blinded to the patientÆs pain report, was then asked to rate the patient's pain. No nurse assessed the same patient both at triage and in the clinical area.

Results: Student t-tests were used to examine differences between patient and nurse pain intensity scores at the two assessment times. At triage, the nurses' pain intensity scores averaged 5.1 (SD 2.4), while the patients' pain intensity scores averaged 7.5 (SD 2.2) (p=0.000). In the clinical area, the nurses' pain intensity scores averaged 4.2 (SD 2.3), while the patients' pain intensity scores averaged 7.7 (SD 2.2) (p=0.000). The differences between the patients' and nurses' ratings of patients' pain were not a factor of nurse gender, age, years in nursing, or years practicing in this ED.

Conclusions: Nurses in this study consistently under-estimated their patients' pain in two separate areas of the ED. Inaccurate estimation of patient pain can have negative consequences for the patient if appropriate treatments are withheld. Use of valid pain assessment methods may improve pain management in the ED. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Department Nurses' and Patients' Estimates of patient Pain: How Close Are They?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162636-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency Department Nurses' and Patients' Estimates of patient Pain: How Close Are They?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kathleen, , Puntillo</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept. of Physiological Nursing, N611Y, Box 0610, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, 94143</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Martha Neighbor, Nel O'Neil</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Pain is the most frequent reason that patients seek assistance from health care providers. Little is known about the accuracy of emergency department (ED) nurses' assessments of their patients' pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between patients&AElig; and nurses&AElig; pain reports when patients presented to the ED.<br/><br/>Setting: This study was conducted in an ED in a Level I trauma setting in Western United States. The ED manages approximately 200 patients per day.<br/><br/>Sample: A convenience sample of 156 patients who presented to triage seeking health care assistance, and the 27 nurses who performed their initial assessments were included in the sample. A convenience subsample of 44 of the 156 patients was later assessed in the clinical area of the ED by another 27 nurses.<br/><br/>Methodology: A prospective, descriptive design was used to determine differences in pain reports. Patients were asked by a member of the research team to rate their pain at triage and in the clinical area using a horizontal 0 - 10 numerical rating scale (NRS), where 0 = no pain and 10- = worst pain possible. The NRS pain scale has established construct and concurrent validity and test-retest reliability. At each time, the patient&AElig;s nurse, who was blinded to the patient&AElig;s pain report, was then asked to rate the patient's pain. No nurse assessed the same patient both at triage and in the clinical area.<br/><br/>Results: Student t-tests were used to examine differences between patient and nurse pain intensity scores at the two assessment times. At triage, the nurses' pain intensity scores averaged 5.1 (SD 2.4), while the patients' pain intensity scores averaged 7.5 (SD 2.2) (p=0.000). In the clinical area, the nurses' pain intensity scores averaged 4.2 (SD 2.3), while the patients' pain intensity scores averaged 7.7 (SD 2.2) (p=0.000). The differences between the patients' and nurses' ratings of patients' pain were not a factor of nurse gender, age, years in nursing, or years practicing in this ED.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Nurses in this study consistently under-estimated their patients' pain in two separate areas of the ED. Inaccurate estimation of patient pain can have negative consequences for the patient if appropriate treatments are withheld. Use of valid pain assessment methods may improve pain management in the ED. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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