An Evaluation of Advanced Noninvasive Blood Pressure (NIBP) Monitoring Technology

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162637
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evaluation of Advanced Noninvasive Blood Pressure (NIBP) Monitoring Technology
Abstract:
An Evaluation of Advanced Noninvasive Blood Pressure (NIBP) Monitoring Technology
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Jo, , Simpson
Contact Address:Morton Plant Mease Health Care Research, 323 Jeffords Street, MS 49, Clearwater, FL, 33757
Contact Telephone:USA
Co-Authors:Andrea D. Stebor
Clinical Topic: The purpose of this multi-site clinical project was to evaluate the performance of an Advanced Noninvasive Blood Pressure (NIBP) monitor when compared to other blood pressure devices currently used in clinical practice in the emergency department (ED), Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) and the outpatient clinic.

The efficiency and accuracy of blood pressure monitors may be improved with modifications in software and/or hardware monitoring techniques. This clinical project was initiated to evaluate the software changes to the blood pressure monitor on patients in different hospital environments that the monitor would normally be used in.

Implementation: The clinical project was designed to study the vital signs parameters of NIBP including systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure and pulse rate. An adult/pediatric patient population was selected to include a range of arm circumferences and blood pressure values. The order of the test and reference (control) blood pressure monitors was randomized throughout the project and resulted in a total of 305 measurement comparisons. Implementation of this clinical project included the following steps:

1. Determining factors that supported good blood pressure measurement technique;
2. Evaluating the potential for improvement in the blood pressure measurement technology;
3. Selecting a representative sample of potential clinicians including different clinical environments and patient types;
4. Applying appropriately sized cuffs to both arms;
5. Initiating NIBP measurements on both the test and reference blood pressure monitors at the same time; and
6. Documenting the blood pressure monitor display values, recorder printouts and patient comfort ratings.

Outcomes: The Advanced NIBP monitor was more comfortable (51%) than the marketed reference monitors. In 88% of the comparisons the Advanced NIBP monitor displayed values faster, and displayed a message when artifact was noted during the NIBP determination (6%). A faster reading may facilitate an increased patient comfort level. Display of an artifact message may assist the clinician in analysis of the blood pressure values. The percentage of successful determinations (number of times the monitors display blood pressure values) was noted to be about the same for the Advanced NIBP and the reference monitors.

Recommendations: Recommendations resulting from this project include:

1. Maintaining good blood pressure measurement technique by choosing the correct blood pressure cuff size, instructing the patient to refrain from talking or moving and letting nothing press against the cuff during measurements;
2. Successful blood pressure determinations (obtaining any type of NIBP values) is a priority for the clinician; and
3. Faster NIBP readings may result in an increased patient comfort level. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Evaluation of Advanced Noninvasive Blood Pressure (NIBP) Monitoring Technologyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162637-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Evaluation of Advanced Noninvasive Blood Pressure (NIBP) Monitoring Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jo, , Simpson</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Morton Plant Mease Health Care Research, 323 Jeffords Street, MS 49, Clearwater, FL, 33757</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Andrea D. Stebor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: The purpose of this multi-site clinical project was to evaluate the performance of an Advanced Noninvasive Blood Pressure (NIBP) monitor when compared to other blood pressure devices currently used in clinical practice in the emergency department (ED), Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) and the outpatient clinic.<br/><br/>The efficiency and accuracy of blood pressure monitors may be improved with modifications in software and/or hardware monitoring techniques. This clinical project was initiated to evaluate the software changes to the blood pressure monitor on patients in different hospital environments that the monitor would normally be used in.<br/><br/>Implementation: The clinical project was designed to study the vital signs parameters of NIBP including systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure and pulse rate. An adult/pediatric patient population was selected to include a range of arm circumferences and blood pressure values. The order of the test and reference (control) blood pressure monitors was randomized throughout the project and resulted in a total of 305 measurement comparisons. Implementation of this clinical project included the following steps:<br/><br/>1. Determining factors that supported good blood pressure measurement technique;<br/>2. Evaluating the potential for improvement in the blood pressure measurement technology;<br/>3. Selecting a representative sample of potential clinicians including different clinical environments and patient types;<br/>4. Applying appropriately sized cuffs to both arms;<br/>5. Initiating NIBP measurements on both the test and reference blood pressure monitors at the same time; and<br/>6. Documenting the blood pressure monitor display values, recorder printouts and patient comfort ratings.<br/><br/>Outcomes: The Advanced NIBP monitor was more comfortable (51%) than the marketed reference monitors. In 88% of the comparisons the Advanced NIBP monitor displayed values faster, and displayed a message when artifact was noted during the NIBP determination (6%). A faster reading may facilitate an increased patient comfort level. Display of an artifact message may assist the clinician in analysis of the blood pressure values. The percentage of successful determinations (number of times the monitors display blood pressure values) was noted to be about the same for the Advanced NIBP and the reference monitors.<br/><br/>Recommendations: Recommendations resulting from this project include:<br/><br/>1. Maintaining good blood pressure measurement technique by choosing the correct blood pressure cuff size, instructing the patient to refrain from talking or moving and letting nothing press against the cuff during measurements;<br/>2. Successful blood pressure determinations (obtaining any type of NIBP values) is a priority for the clinician; and<br/>3. Faster NIBP readings may result in an increased patient comfort level. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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