2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162640
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Literacy of Spanish-speaking Persons in the ED
Abstract:
Health Literacy of Spanish-speaking Persons in the ED
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Debbie, , Travers
Title:dtravers@med.unc.edu
Contact Address:Dept. of Emergency Medicine, CB #7594,, UNC at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599
Contact Telephone:USA
Co-Authors:Jane Brice, Matt Young
Purpose: Previous studies describe low functional health literacy (FHL) among urban Spanish-speaking ED patients, and show that written discharge instructions often exceed average English-speaking patients' reading abilities. The study site, which serves a rural and semi-urban population, has experienced a 300% increase in Hispanic patients since 1990. The FHL of this population has not been established. The study goal was to evaluate the FHL of Spanish-speaking ED patients.

Design/Setting/Sample: Spanish-speaking subjects were matched by age and gender to an English-speaking cohort and enrolled prospectively at a southeastern academic ED. Consecutive adult patients or guardians of children visiting between 11 am and 11 pm were included. Excluded were non-native Spanish or English-speakers, those with mental or visual impairment, police custody, unstable condition, or self-reported illiteracy.

Methods: A literacy consultant trained bilingual researchers to use the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA), which has been validated in English and Spanish. The TOFHLA measures the patient's ability to comprehend written health instructions. Possible scores range from 0 to 100 (<60 inadequate, 60-74 marginal, and >74 adequate FHL). Inter-rater agreement ranged from 82 to 100%. Analyses included chi square, t-test, correlation, and multiple linear regressions.

Results: Of 469 subjects approached, 84 matched pairs were enrolled. Mean TOFHLA for Spanish-speakers (59.7) and English-speakers (90.7) differed significantly (p=.001), with less than adequate FHL in 75% of Spanish-speakers compared to 7% of English-speakers. Mean years of education was 8 for Spanish-speakers and 13 for English-speakers. Last grade completed predicted TOFHLA score (p=.004); subjects with less than an eighth grade education scored 60 or less.

Conclusions: ED nurses should develop alternatives to written discharge instructions for Spanish-speaking persons reporting less than an eighth grade education, such as videos, pictures and oral translations. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Literacy of Spanish-speaking Persons in the EDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162640-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Literacy of Spanish-speaking Persons in the ED</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Debbie, , Travers</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">dtravers@med.unc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept. of Emergency Medicine, CB #7594,, UNC at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jane Brice, Matt Young</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Previous studies describe low functional health literacy (FHL) among urban Spanish-speaking ED patients, and show that written discharge instructions often exceed average English-speaking patients' reading abilities. The study site, which serves a rural and semi-urban population, has experienced a 300% increase in Hispanic patients since 1990. The FHL of this population has not been established. The study goal was to evaluate the FHL of Spanish-speaking ED patients.<br/><br/>Design/Setting/Sample: Spanish-speaking subjects were matched by age and gender to an English-speaking cohort and enrolled prospectively at a southeastern academic ED. Consecutive adult patients or guardians of children visiting between 11 am and 11 pm were included. Excluded were non-native Spanish or English-speakers, those with mental or visual impairment, police custody, unstable condition, or self-reported illiteracy.<br/><br/>Methods: A literacy consultant trained bilingual researchers to use the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA), which has been validated in English and Spanish. The TOFHLA measures the patient's ability to comprehend written health instructions. Possible scores range from 0 to 100 (&lt;60 inadequate, 60-74 marginal, and &gt;74 adequate FHL). Inter-rater agreement ranged from 82 to 100%. Analyses included chi square, t-test, correlation, and multiple linear regressions.<br/><br/>Results: Of 469 subjects approached, 84 matched pairs were enrolled. Mean TOFHLA for Spanish-speakers (59.7) and English-speakers (90.7) differed significantly (p=.001), with less than adequate FHL in 75% of Spanish-speakers compared to 7% of English-speakers. Mean years of education was 8 for Spanish-speakers and 13 for English-speakers. Last grade completed predicted TOFHLA score (p=.004); subjects with less than an eighth grade education scored 60 or less.<br/><br/>Conclusions: ED nurses should develop alternatives to written discharge instructions for Spanish-speaking persons reporting less than an eighth grade education, such as videos, pictures and oral translations. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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