Efficacy of Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course (ENPC) Education on Skill Acquisition in Practicing Emergency Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162643
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course (ENPC) Education on Skill Acquisition in Practicing Emergency Nurses
Abstract:
Efficacy of Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course (ENPC) Education on Skill Acquisition in Practicing Emergency Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:1999
Author:Laraine, , Yakowich Moody
Contact Address:DMC Campbell Health Center, 2301 E. Alexandrine, Detroit, MI, 48207
Contact Telephone:USA
Co-Authors:David J. Treloar, Matthew J. Winchester, Kathleen DeBaker
Purpose: Many education courses are available that are intended to improve pediatric emergency skills, i.e., PALS< ENPC, and APLS. However, there is little data that supports the efficacy of those courses for nurses. Based on Bandura's theory of self-efficacy, an effective course should improve knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to use a performance evaluation to examine the effects of an ENPC course on knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy in practicing emergency nurses.

Setting/Sample: The study and ENPC program were conducted in a community education center in a small mid-western town. Eligible RN subjects practiced in rural or community hospital settings and were responsible for providing emergent care to children. A self-selected convenience sample was obtained from nurse managers at 9 community hospitals in remote areas of the state. Nurses (n=27) participating in the study had a mean age of 39.74 and an average 6.48 years of emergency experience.

Design & Methodology: Using a prospective observational design, RN participants completed objective structured clinical evaluations (OSCE) and a self-efficacy survey before and after attending an ENPC program. OSCE consisted of 5 timed, simulated pediatric emergency counters (burns, trauma, airway, resuscitation, & triage), coupled with corresponding written evaluations measuring knowledge, problem-solving and psychomotor skills. Percentage of correct responses given in each OSCE encounter was calculated based on observer ratings. Participants rated confidence (self-efficacy) levels on a scale of 1 to 10 (low to high), on specific nursing tasks and general emergency management. Clinical evaluation measures (OSCE) and self-efficacy surveys were designed, pilot-tested and revised by a group of expert pediatric emergency nurses using a direct observation, debriefing and videotaping to establish face validity and reliability of the instruments. Interrater reliability was assessed using a Kappa coefficient and determined to be consistent.

Results: Comparisons of pre-course and post-course skill performance and self-efficacy were made using paired t-tests and Chi-square. Overall skill performance improved 67%, from 35% to 58% correct responses (p<0.01). Management in all areas of skill performance improved greatly: airway (50%), burns (50%), resuscitation (71%), triage (74%), and trauma (94%). Self-efficacy improved 44%, from confidence levels of 5.4 to 7.8, p<0.01.

Conclusions: Overall knowledge, skill performance and self-efficacy significantly improved following completion of an ENPC program. Further research should be conducted to investigate whether improvements in performance and self-efficacy last over time and what impact ENPC education has on clinical practice. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course (ENPC) Education on Skill Acquisition in Practicing Emergency Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162643-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Efficacy of Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course (ENPC) Education on Skill Acquisition in Practicing Emergency Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1999</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Laraine, , Yakowich Moody</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">DMC Campbell Health Center, 2301 E. Alexandrine, Detroit, MI, 48207</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">David J. Treloar, Matthew J. Winchester, Kathleen DeBaker</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Many education courses are available that are intended to improve pediatric emergency skills, i.e., PALS&lt; ENPC, and APLS. However, there is little data that supports the efficacy of those courses for nurses. Based on Bandura's theory of self-efficacy, an effective course should improve knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to use a performance evaluation to examine the effects of an ENPC course on knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy in practicing emergency nurses.<br/><br/>Setting/Sample: The study and ENPC program were conducted in a community education center in a small mid-western town. Eligible RN subjects practiced in rural or community hospital settings and were responsible for providing emergent care to children. A self-selected convenience sample was obtained from nurse managers at 9 community hospitals in remote areas of the state. Nurses (n=27) participating in the study had a mean age of 39.74 and an average 6.48 years of emergency experience.<br/><br/>Design &amp; Methodology: Using a prospective observational design, RN participants completed objective structured clinical evaluations (OSCE) and a self-efficacy survey before and after attending an ENPC program. OSCE consisted of 5 timed, simulated pediatric emergency counters (burns, trauma, airway, resuscitation, &amp; triage), coupled with corresponding written evaluations measuring knowledge, problem-solving and psychomotor skills. Percentage of correct responses given in each OSCE encounter was calculated based on observer ratings. Participants rated confidence (self-efficacy) levels on a scale of 1 to 10 (low to high), on specific nursing tasks and general emergency management. Clinical evaluation measures (OSCE) and self-efficacy surveys were designed, pilot-tested and revised by a group of expert pediatric emergency nurses using a direct observation, debriefing and videotaping to establish face validity and reliability of the instruments. Interrater reliability was assessed using a Kappa coefficient and determined to be consistent.<br/><br/>Results: Comparisons of pre-course and post-course skill performance and self-efficacy were made using paired t-tests and Chi-square. Overall skill performance improved 67%, from 35% to 58% correct responses (p&lt;0.01). Management in all areas of skill performance improved greatly: airway (50%), burns (50%), resuscitation (71%), triage (74%), and trauma (94%). Self-efficacy improved 44%, from confidence levels of 5.4 to 7.8, p&lt;0.01.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Overall knowledge, skill performance and self-efficacy significantly improved following completion of an ENPC program. Further research should be conducted to investigate whether improvements in performance and self-efficacy last over time and what impact ENPC education has on clinical practice. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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