Ready for Disaster or Not: An Exploration of Citizen Preparedness in North Central Texas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162644
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ready for Disaster or Not: An Exploration of Citizen Preparedness in North Central Texas
Abstract:
Ready for Disaster or Not: An Exploration of Citizen Preparedness in North Central Texas
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Adams, Lavonne, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:TCU Harris College of Nursing & Health Sciences
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:TCU Box 298620, Fort Worth, TX, 76129, USA
Contact Telephone:(817) 257-6805
Co-Authors:Sharon Canclini, MS, RN, FCN; Patricia Bradley, DNS, RN
[Injury Prevention Poster] Injury Prevention Topic: In August 2005, North Central Texas provided disaster relief to thousands of coastal neighbors fleeing Hurricane Katrina, yet is vulnerable to disasters of its own. Floods, tornadoes, and wildfires are not uncommon in this part of the country. When disaster strikes, community members are expected to care for themselves and one another in its aftermath. Little is known, however, about the level of public disaster preparedness, generally, or whether educational interventions improve readiness. In January 2006, faculty and students at this college of nursing collaborated with members of the community to explore their ability to respond to disaster and to obtain preliminary data on the impact of educational intervention on that ability.

Implementation: In January 2006, faculty members developed a clinical project for a group of nine students studying community health. The project consisted of three parts: an assessment of the community's disaster preparedness needs and/or knowledge gaps; the development and implementation of a disaster preparedness educational intervention, based on assessment results; and a pilot survey to determine the intervention's effectiveness. To develop the assessment, students met with leaders of five churches representing 8,144 community members. Working from a list of commonly cited preparedness needs, students interviewed church leaders to determine the community's preparedness needs and developed educational posters based on the top three needs: emergency communication plan; how to maintain an emergency food and water supply for home; and how to protect important documents. Participants at each church were encouraged to view the posters at their own pace before, during and after services on a pre-determined day, with students available to answer questions and provide handouts of key disaster preparation points as well as a template of a communication plan they could take home and complete themselves. At one of the five churches, members gave informed consent to complete a survey before and after viewing the posters. Survey questions were developed based on disaster preparedness literature and common preparedness activities. Because the instrument was new, we chose to pilot it at only one church, anticipating later revisions to improve it. Respondents answered demographic items, as well as 12 closed-ended questions that addressed specific actions they had or had not taken to prepare for a disaster. Examples include: "Do you have an emergency food supply?" or "Do you have an emergency communication plan for your family and/or significant others?" For actions answered "no," participants rated the likelihood or "possibility" they would undertake that action in the future on a 5-point scale, ranging from "not at all" to "definitely." Participants then viewed the posters and once more completed the survey.

Outcomes: Overall, community members said the posters were helpful and requested further educational presentations, whether or not they participated in the survey. Of the 41 members who did complete the survey, 25 were women and 16 were men, with 65% ages 40-59 and 35% aged 30-39. Thirty-four percent graduated from a 4-year college, 85% were married, and 51% had children at home. Results from the pre-poster intervention survey indicated that most respondents would like to learn more about disaster preparation (92.7%), but few kept on hand an emergency supply of food (37.8%), water (43.2%), copies of important documents (27.8%), an emergency communication plan for their families and significant others (21.6%), or a disaster kit for the home (13.5%) or car (13.9%). However, "possibility scores" increased across all activities (pre-test scores ranged from 2.18 to 3.86 compared to a range of 2.77 to 4.24 for post-test scores). Encouraged by these results, we plan to expand our intervention by participation in community health fairs or by developing our own "Safety and Disaster Preparedness Fair." Plans also are under consideration to conduct a longer-term study that would allow us to assess changes in preparedness behavior over time.

Recommendations: This study demonstrates the value of forming partnerships between community members and the nurses who serve them. Engaging schools of nursing, community health nurses, and emergency nurses in efforts that raise awareness and educate the public on how to prepare for disasters will prevent injury and save lives.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReady for Disaster or Not: An Exploration of Citizen Preparedness in North Central Texasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162644-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ready for Disaster or Not: An Exploration of Citizen Preparedness in North Central Texas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adams, Lavonne, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">TCU Harris College of Nursing &amp; Health Sciences<br/></td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">TCU Box 298620, Fort Worth, TX, 76129, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(817) 257-6805</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">L.adams2@tcu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sharon Canclini, MS, RN, FCN; Patricia Bradley, DNS, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Injury Prevention Poster] Injury Prevention Topic: In August 2005, North Central Texas provided disaster relief to thousands of coastal neighbors fleeing Hurricane Katrina, yet is vulnerable to disasters of its own. Floods, tornadoes, and wildfires are not uncommon in this part of the country. When disaster strikes, community members are expected to care for themselves and one another in its aftermath. Little is known, however, about the level of public disaster preparedness, generally, or whether educational interventions improve readiness. In January 2006, faculty and students at this college of nursing collaborated with members of the community to explore their ability to respond to disaster and to obtain preliminary data on the impact of educational intervention on that ability.<br/><br/>Implementation: In January 2006, faculty members developed a clinical project for a group of nine students studying community health. The project consisted of three parts: an assessment of the community's disaster preparedness needs and/or knowledge gaps; the development and implementation of a disaster preparedness educational intervention, based on assessment results; and a pilot survey to determine the intervention's effectiveness. To develop the assessment, students met with leaders of five churches representing 8,144 community members. Working from a list of commonly cited preparedness needs, students interviewed church leaders to determine the community's preparedness needs and developed educational posters based on the top three needs: emergency communication plan; how to maintain an emergency food and water supply for home; and how to protect important documents. Participants at each church were encouraged to view the posters at their own pace before, during and after services on a pre-determined day, with students available to answer questions and provide handouts of key disaster preparation points as well as a template of a communication plan they could take home and complete themselves. At one of the five churches, members gave informed consent to complete a survey before and after viewing the posters. Survey questions were developed based on disaster preparedness literature and common preparedness activities. Because the instrument was new, we chose to pilot it at only one church, anticipating later revisions to improve it. Respondents answered demographic items, as well as 12 closed-ended questions that addressed specific actions they had or had not taken to prepare for a disaster. Examples include: &quot;Do you have an emergency food supply?&quot; or &quot;Do you have an emergency communication plan for your family and/or significant others?&quot; For actions answered &quot;no,&quot; participants rated the likelihood or &quot;possibility&quot; they would undertake that action in the future on a 5-point scale, ranging from &quot;not at all&quot; to &quot;definitely.&quot; Participants then viewed the posters and once more completed the survey.<br/><br/>Outcomes: Overall, community members said the posters were helpful and requested further educational presentations, whether or not they participated in the survey. Of the 41 members who did complete the survey, 25 were women and 16 were men, with 65% ages 40-59 and 35% aged 30-39. Thirty-four percent graduated from a 4-year college, 85% were married, and 51% had children at home. Results from the pre-poster intervention survey indicated that most respondents would like to learn more about disaster preparation (92.7%), but few kept on hand an emergency supply of food (37.8%), water (43.2%), copies of important documents (27.8%), an emergency communication plan for their families and significant others (21.6%), or a disaster kit for the home (13.5%) or car (13.9%). However, &quot;possibility scores&quot; increased across all activities (pre-test scores ranged from 2.18 to 3.86 compared to a range of 2.77 to 4.24 for post-test scores). Encouraged by these results, we plan to expand our intervention by participation in community health fairs or by developing our own &quot;Safety and Disaster Preparedness Fair.&quot; Plans also are under consideration to conduct a longer-term study that would allow us to assess changes in preparedness behavior over time.<br/><br/>Recommendations: This study demonstrates the value of forming partnerships between community members and the nurses who serve them. Engaging schools of nursing, community health nurses, and emergency nurses in efforts that raise awareness and educate the public on how to prepare for disasters will prevent injury and save lives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.