Expanding Compassionate Care to All Victims of Violence: The Forensic Nurse's Role

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162647
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Expanding Compassionate Care to All Victims of Violence: The Forensic Nurse's Role
Abstract:
Expanding Compassionate Care to All Victims of Violence: The Forensic Nurse's Role
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Brogan, Connie, RN, CEN, SANE-A
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Luke's Hospital
Title:Forensic Program Clinical Director
Contact Address:4401 Wornall, Kansas City, MO, 64111, USA
Contact Telephone:(816) 932-1399
Co-Authors:Michael Weaver, MD, FACEP; Kathleen Hitchcock, RN, SANE-A
[Clinical Poster] Clinical Topic: In 1974, working collaboratively with local advocacy, law enforcement, and prosecution communities, Saint Luke?s Hospital in Kansas City, MO, established the first hospital-based rape crisis program in the United States. The program provided sexual assault victims with prompt and compassionate emergency care from forensic nurses trained to identify physical and psychological trauma and recognize and document appropriate evidence. In 1995, the advent of DNA technology led to the development and adoption by many hospitals, including St. Luke's, of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Program (SANE). Since instituting that program at St. Luke's, efficacy of evidence collection and admissibility of court evidence at St. Luke's has increased from 63 % to its current rate of 98%. Now, St. Luke's is working to expand the SANE program to bring victims of all inflicted violence competent and compassionate care. This abstract describes that process.

Implementation: In 2005, the International Association of Forensic Nursing (IAFN) revised its practice standards to recommend forensic nursing care be offered to victims of all violence, including domestic violence, elder abuse and child abuse. St. Luke's responded by forming a System Leadership team in 2006 to study how best to provide such care, not only to patients at its urban trauma centers, but also to those presenting to its rural emergency departments. All ED nurses at St. Luke's are trained in forensic nursing and follow a system-wide protocol that ensures sexual assault victims receive the same standard of care regardless of ED location. The leadership team, made up of chief nursing officers, forensic coordinators, ED directors, staff nurses, and the system medical director, met monthly for a period of a year, and continue to meet, to study the problem. The core of SANE at St. Luke's consists of Sexual Assault Response Resource Teams representing the law enforcement, prosecution, advocacy, medicine and forensic nursing communities, as well as past victims, who together work to provide every citizen with access to community and hospital resources. To expand this program to the other types of abuse, the team researched a number of sources, including IAFN's and ENA's practice standards and position statements as well as the forensic nursing literature and protocols of other nationally-recognized forensic programs. Armed with this information, they collaborated with forensic coordinators and recognized experts in domestic, child, and elder abuse to develop new policies, procedures, screening tools, and documentation forms. This approach ensured coordination between the law enforcement, advocacy, prosecution, and EMS communities.

Outcomes: To date, drafts of policies and procedures, and system forms to document abuse of every kind are currently being reviewed by law enforcement and prosecution members of the community. The revised forms will become part of the core content for prosecution and law enforcement documentation, with completion one of our measurable goals for 2007. As with SANE, once the new program is implemented, patient satisfaction will be measured using the Press Ganey tool (patient satisfaction for the SANE program is currently 98%). Since its inception, the current project has been partially funded by the St. Luke's Hospital Foundation, which also sends 10 nurses to an international forensic conference each year and which funds a forensic library at each campus to keep educational resources current. The Foundation also awards a $1,000 scholarship every year to the "Forensic Nurse of the Year."

Recommendations: Core practice standards of emergency and forensic nursing as well as community involvement have changed the way victims of violence are cared for in the emergency setting. Integrating ENA and IAFN standards of practice within a health care system that encompasses both urban and rural settings will ensure that victims of all inflicted violence receive advanced trauma and forensic evidentiary care. Finding ways to bridge the gap between forensic nursing and external customers, such as law enforcement and advocacy services, not only helps victims of abuse, but strengthens the communities in which they work and live.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExpanding Compassionate Care to All Victims of Violence: The Forensic Nurse's Roleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162647-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Expanding Compassionate Care to All Victims of Violence: The Forensic Nurse's Role</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brogan, Connie, RN, CEN, SANE-A</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Luke's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Forensic Program Clinical Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4401 Wornall, Kansas City, MO, 64111, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(816) 932-1399</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cbrogan@centurytel.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael Weaver, MD, FACEP; Kathleen Hitchcock, RN, SANE-A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical Poster] Clinical Topic: In 1974, working collaboratively with local advocacy, law enforcement, and prosecution communities, Saint Luke?s Hospital in Kansas City, MO, established the first hospital-based rape crisis program in the United States. The program provided sexual assault victims with prompt and compassionate emergency care from forensic nurses trained to identify physical and psychological trauma and recognize and document appropriate evidence. In 1995, the advent of DNA technology led to the development and adoption by many hospitals, including St. Luke's, of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Program (SANE). Since instituting that program at St. Luke's, efficacy of evidence collection and admissibility of court evidence at St. Luke's has increased from 63 % to its current rate of 98%. Now, St. Luke's is working to expand the SANE program to bring victims of all inflicted violence competent and compassionate care. This abstract describes that process.<br/><br/>Implementation: In 2005, the International Association of Forensic Nursing (IAFN) revised its practice standards to recommend forensic nursing care be offered to victims of all violence, including domestic violence, elder abuse and child abuse. St. Luke's responded by forming a System Leadership team in 2006 to study how best to provide such care, not only to patients at its urban trauma centers, but also to those presenting to its rural emergency departments. All ED nurses at St. Luke's are trained in forensic nursing and follow a system-wide protocol that ensures sexual assault victims receive the same standard of care regardless of ED location. The leadership team, made up of chief nursing officers, forensic coordinators, ED directors, staff nurses, and the system medical director, met monthly for a period of a year, and continue to meet, to study the problem. The core of SANE at St. Luke's consists of Sexual Assault Response Resource Teams representing the law enforcement, prosecution, advocacy, medicine and forensic nursing communities, as well as past victims, who together work to provide every citizen with access to community and hospital resources. To expand this program to the other types of abuse, the team researched a number of sources, including IAFN's and ENA's practice standards and position statements as well as the forensic nursing literature and protocols of other nationally-recognized forensic programs. Armed with this information, they collaborated with forensic coordinators and recognized experts in domestic, child, and elder abuse to develop new policies, procedures, screening tools, and documentation forms. This approach ensured coordination between the law enforcement, advocacy, prosecution, and EMS communities.<br/><br/>Outcomes: To date, drafts of policies and procedures, and system forms to document abuse of every kind are currently being reviewed by law enforcement and prosecution members of the community. The revised forms will become part of the core content for prosecution and law enforcement documentation, with completion one of our measurable goals for 2007. As with SANE, once the new program is implemented, patient satisfaction will be measured using the Press Ganey tool (patient satisfaction for the SANE program is currently 98%). Since its inception, the current project has been partially funded by the St. Luke's Hospital Foundation, which also sends 10 nurses to an international forensic conference each year and which funds a forensic library at each campus to keep educational resources current. The Foundation also awards a $1,000 scholarship every year to the &quot;Forensic Nurse of the Year.&quot;<br/><br/>Recommendations: Core practice standards of emergency and forensic nursing as well as community involvement have changed the way victims of violence are cared for in the emergency setting. Integrating ENA and IAFN standards of practice within a health care system that encompasses both urban and rural settings will ensure that victims of all inflicted violence receive advanced trauma and forensic evidentiary care. Finding ways to bridge the gap between forensic nursing and external customers, such as law enforcement and advocacy services, not only helps victims of abuse, but strengthens the communities in which they work and live.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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