2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162650
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Installing Smoke Alarms Saves Lives: An Emergency Department-Supported Program
Abstract:
Installing Smoke Alarms Saves Lives: An Emergency Department-Supported Program
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Davis, Roberta, BS
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Hospital of Michigan
Title:Smoke Alarm Program Coordinator
Contact Address:3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA
Contact Telephone:(313) 745-0072
Co-Authors: Kristin Rosenthal, MEd, CHES, CPST; Sue Smith, RN, MSN
[Injury Prevention Poster] Injury Prevention Topic: Every 34 minutes someone in the United States dies from injuries sustained in a house fire. Fires kill more than 600 children ages 14 and under each year and injure 47,000 more. Hospital emergency departments (ED) treat 88,000 children ages 14 and under for burn-related injuries every year. In Michigan, 94 house fires took 119 lives in 2004. Of those houses, only 15, or 17%, had functioning alarms, while 79, or an astonishing 83% of the homes did not. The Detroit Fire Department (DFD) estimates that the figure for Detroit homes is even higher. Indeed, 27% of all fire-related deaths in Michigan occur in the City of Detroit. In 2000, six Detroit children died in a house fire that had working smoke alarms, but no escape plan in place so children did not know how to get out of a burning house. These children were burnt beyond recognition, yet were brought to the emergency department so family members could say good-bye. That day we made a decision to try to effect change in the community so another horrific event like that would never happen again. The goal of this project was to design a program that would provide families with the tools they need to survive a house fire: functioning smoke alarms, an escape plan, and education on the importance of practicing the plan.

Implementation: In 2000, this facility, a verified Level I Pediatric Trauma Center in Detroit, partnered with the DFD to initiate a Smoke Alarm Installation Program. Through our umbrella injury prevention program, TRIP (Trauma Related Injury Prevention program), we developed a smoke alarm safety survey tool and smoke alarm installation program for to help families prevent injury from house fires. Following patient physicals, ED nurses use the tool to assess a family's ability to react to and prevent injury from house fire. Responses to the surveys are entered into a central smoke alarm registry. Consenting families living in houses without smoke alarms are scheduled for installation and in-home education regarding alarm maintenance and escape plan development and practice. Community volunteers as well as the ED director and nurses, trained by TRIP members, go out into the community to install alarms and educate families on how to survive a house fire. Installation takes approximately 20 minutes. TRIP staff members conduct a six-month follow-up call and conduct a post-installation survey.

Outcomes: Since the smoke alarm installation program began in 2000, a total of 2,846 smoke alarms have been installed in 1,552 Detroit homes housing 2,963 adults and 3,301 children. Six-month follow-up data reveal that 76% of families have tested their smoke alarms since installation; 65% have changed their batteries; 80% have developed escape plans; and 54% of those families have practiced their plans. These results represent a dramatic improvement in behavioral change from baseline, and several participating families have reported to us that lives have been saved as a result of their newly installed smoke alarms.

Recommendations: A smoke alarm installation program is an effective means of ensuring families have working alarms on every floor of their homes and an escape plan in place they can follow. The emergency department is an opportune setting to conduct such a program. By enlisting the help of other staff members and partnering with local fire agencies and/or injury prevention programs, emergency nurses can create similar initiatives to prevent needless deaths and injury from fires. At a minimum, ED nurses should take the time to educate family at bedside on the benefits of working smoke alarms.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInstalling Smoke Alarms Saves Lives: An Emergency Department-Supported Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162650-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Installing Smoke Alarms Saves Lives: An Emergency Department-Supported Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Roberta, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Hospital of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Smoke Alarm Program Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(313) 745-0072</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value"> Kristin Rosenthal, MEd, CHES, CPST; Sue Smith, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Injury Prevention Poster] Injury Prevention Topic: Every 34 minutes someone in the United States dies from injuries sustained in a house fire. Fires kill more than 600 children ages 14 and under each year and injure 47,000 more. Hospital emergency departments (ED) treat 88,000 children ages 14 and under for burn-related injuries every year. In Michigan, 94 house fires took 119 lives in 2004. Of those houses, only 15, or 17%, had functioning alarms, while 79, or an astonishing 83% of the homes did not. The Detroit Fire Department (DFD) estimates that the figure for Detroit homes is even higher. Indeed, 27% of all fire-related deaths in Michigan occur in the City of Detroit. In 2000, six Detroit children died in a house fire that had working smoke alarms, but no escape plan in place so children did not know how to get out of a burning house. These children were burnt beyond recognition, yet were brought to the emergency department so family members could say good-bye. That day we made a decision to try to effect change in the community so another horrific event like that would never happen again. The goal of this project was to design a program that would provide families with the tools they need to survive a house fire: functioning smoke alarms, an escape plan, and education on the importance of practicing the plan.<br/><br/>Implementation: In 2000, this facility, a verified Level I Pediatric Trauma Center in Detroit, partnered with the DFD to initiate a Smoke Alarm Installation Program. Through our umbrella injury prevention program, TRIP (Trauma Related Injury Prevention program), we developed a smoke alarm safety survey tool and smoke alarm installation program for to help families prevent injury from house fires. Following patient physicals, ED nurses use the tool to assess a family's ability to react to and prevent injury from house fire. Responses to the surveys are entered into a central smoke alarm registry. Consenting families living in houses without smoke alarms are scheduled for installation and in-home education regarding alarm maintenance and escape plan development and practice. Community volunteers as well as the ED director and nurses, trained by TRIP members, go out into the community to install alarms and educate families on how to survive a house fire. Installation takes approximately 20 minutes. TRIP staff members conduct a six-month follow-up call and conduct a post-installation survey.<br/><br/>Outcomes: Since the smoke alarm installation program began in 2000, a total of 2,846 smoke alarms have been installed in 1,552 Detroit homes housing 2,963 adults and 3,301 children. Six-month follow-up data reveal that 76% of families have tested their smoke alarms since installation; 65% have changed their batteries; 80% have developed escape plans; and 54% of those families have practiced their plans. These results represent a dramatic improvement in behavioral change from baseline, and several participating families have reported to us that lives have been saved as a result of their newly installed smoke alarms.<br/><br/>Recommendations: A smoke alarm installation program is an effective means of ensuring families have working alarms on every floor of their homes and an escape plan in place they can follow. The emergency department is an opportune setting to conduct such a program. By enlisting the help of other staff members and partnering with local fire agencies and/or injury prevention programs, emergency nurses can create similar initiatives to prevent needless deaths and injury from fires. At a minimum, ED nurses should take the time to educate family at bedside on the benefits of working smoke alarms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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