2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162653
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Secondary Traumatic Stress in Emergency Nurses
Abstract:
Evaluation of Secondary Traumatic Stress in Emergency Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Dominguez-Gomez, Elvira, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Hemet Valley Medical Center
Title:Emergency Room Staff Nurse
Contact Address:1117 E. Devonshire Ave.,, Hemet, CA, 92543, USA
Contact Telephone:(951) 652-2811
Co-Authors:Dana N. Rutledge, RN, PhD
[Research Paper Presentation] Purpose: Emergency nurses are commonly exposed to stressful patient care situations. Repeated exposures to patient suffering, deaths, child injuries, and family reactions to trauma, illness, and death, take a toll. Secondary traumatic stress (STS), also known as compassion fatigue (CF), can result from prolonged and compounded stressors found in the emergency department environment. STS has three components: intrusion, avoidance, and arousal and has been hypothesized to lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout. The purpose of this project was to conduct the first study utilizing the secondary traumatic stress scale (STSS) to evaluate the presence of STS in emergency department (ED) nurses.

Design: A descriptive correlational study design was used.

Setting: This health system, composed of three community hospitals, is located in rural, Southern California. The 2006 annual emergency department visits for each of the three hospitals were 38,164; 24,220; and 19,873.

Sample: A convenience sample of 67 ED nurses (response rate = 60%) primarily females (78%), mean age 43 years (SD=10.5), and Caucasian (75%). The majority identified themselves as associate degree registered nurses (58%) with primary position of direct patient care (82%). Average nursing experience 14 years (SD=10.39), working an average of 41 hours (SD=7.07) per week.

Methodology: Data was collected anonymously by submission of two instruments by mail, or in a designated department mailbox. Instruments were a demographic tool, and the STSS. The STSS is a 17-item tool that evaluates frequency of intrusion, avoidance, and arousal symptoms associated with STS using a 5 point response set ("1= never" to "5= very often"). The STSS has demonstrated internal consistency (alpha 0.93 full STS; subscales 0.80-0.87). Descriptive and correlational statistics were utilized for data analysis. Hospital administration and the institutional review board approved this study.

Results: Participants reported seemingly low levels of STS on the three subscales. The mean scores on subscales (intrusion, avoidance, arousal) were 2.0 (SD=.65), 2.2 (SD=.73) and 2.4 (SD=.81), respectively. There are no scoring guidelines for interpreting these scores with this newly developed tool, but we have interpreted them as "low." The most commonly reported STS symptoms measured by individual items were being easily annoyed (54%), trouble sleeping (52%), desire to avoid working with some clients (52%), and thinking about clients without intending to do so (46%). Women had significantly higher scores on all subscales (p < .05) than men. Caucasian nurses reported higher levels on all subscales compared to other ethnic groups, with a significantly higher score in the arousal subscale.

Conclusions: Despite reported low incidences of STS and its components (intrusion, avoidance, and arousal), specific symptoms were reported by nurses. These symptoms may contribute to emotional exhaustion and potential job separation of emergency nurses. Subsequent studies should be done to evaluate the association of CF/STS on actual burnout and attrition among emergency nurses. Nurse managers may want to investigate or promote use of stress management strategies among nurses working in stressful areas.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Secondary Traumatic Stress in Emergency Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162653-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Secondary Traumatic Stress in Emergency Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dominguez-Gomez, Elvira, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hemet Valley Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Emergency Room Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1117 E. Devonshire Ave.,, Hemet, CA, 92543, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(951) 652-2811</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">e.dominguez-gomez@att.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dana N. Rutledge, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper Presentation] Purpose: Emergency nurses are commonly exposed to stressful patient care situations. Repeated exposures to patient suffering, deaths, child injuries, and family reactions to trauma, illness, and death, take a toll. Secondary traumatic stress (STS), also known as compassion fatigue (CF), can result from prolonged and compounded stressors found in the emergency department environment. STS has three components: intrusion, avoidance, and arousal and has been hypothesized to lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout. The purpose of this project was to conduct the first study utilizing the secondary traumatic stress scale (STSS) to evaluate the presence of STS in emergency department (ED) nurses.<br/><br/>Design: A descriptive correlational study design was used.<br/><br/>Setting: This health system, composed of three community hospitals, is located in rural, Southern California. The 2006 annual emergency department visits for each of the three hospitals were 38,164; 24,220; and 19,873.<br/> <br/>Sample: A convenience sample of 67 ED nurses (response rate = 60%) primarily females (78%), mean age 43 years (SD=10.5), and Caucasian (75%). The majority identified themselves as associate degree registered nurses (58%) with primary position of direct patient care (82%). Average nursing experience 14 years (SD=10.39), working an average of 41 hours (SD=7.07) per week.<br/><br/>Methodology: Data was collected anonymously by submission of two instruments by mail, or in a designated department mailbox. Instruments were a demographic tool, and the STSS. The STSS is a 17-item tool that evaluates frequency of intrusion, avoidance, and arousal symptoms associated with STS using a 5 point response set (&quot;1= never&quot; to &quot;5= very often&quot;). The STSS has demonstrated internal consistency (alpha 0.93 full STS; subscales 0.80-0.87). Descriptive and correlational statistics were utilized for data analysis. Hospital administration and the institutional review board approved this study.<br/><br/>Results: Participants reported seemingly low levels of STS on the three subscales. The mean scores on subscales (intrusion, avoidance, arousal) were 2.0 (SD=.65), 2.2 (SD=.73) and 2.4 (SD=.81), respectively. There are no scoring guidelines for interpreting these scores with this newly developed tool, but we have interpreted them as &quot;low.&quot; The most commonly reported STS symptoms measured by individual items were being easily annoyed (54%), trouble sleeping (52%), desire to avoid working with some clients (52%), and thinking about clients without intending to do so (46%). Women had significantly higher scores on all subscales (p &lt; .05) than men. Caucasian nurses reported higher levels on all subscales compared to other ethnic groups, with a significantly higher score in the arousal subscale.<br/><br/>Conclusions: Despite reported low incidences of STS and its components (intrusion, avoidance, and arousal), specific symptoms were reported by nurses. These symptoms may contribute to emotional exhaustion and potential job separation of emergency nurses. Subsequent studies should be done to evaluate the association of CF/STS on actual burnout and attrition among emergency nurses. Nurse managers may want to investigate or promote use of stress management strategies among nurses working in stressful areas.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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