2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162657
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Taming the Wild Beasts, Averting Disaster: Camp Safety Zone
Abstract:
Taming the Wild Beasts, Averting Disaster: Camp Safety Zone
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Godwin, Robin M., RN, BSN, MSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:John D. Archbold Memorial Hospital, Emergency Department
Title:Assistant Director ? Emergency Department
Contact Address:915 Gordon Ave., Thomasville, GA, 31792, USA
Contact Telephone:(229) 228-8049
[Injury Prevention Poster] Injury Prevention Topic: Unintentional injury kills more children 14 years of age and under than any other cause, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Emergency nurses are in an ideal position to help prevent such injuries. For years, emergency department (ED) staff at this state-designated trauma center in southwest Georgia has provided ENA Injury Prevention/EN CARE training and presentations to local schools on a range of topics - from bicycle and motor vehicle safety to alcohol and drug awareness. We felt we could do more, and in 2001, Camp Safety Zone was born.

Implementation: The idea for the camp was conceived and developed by ED staff in December 2000. The idea came naturally and focuses entirely on injury prevention. Several staff had completed ENA Injury Prevention/EN CARE training and some had experience working with children at summer camps. Camp Safety Zone opened in July 2001, operating on a budget of less than $1,000, pieced together from various ED funds and donations from community organizations. With the help of one of an administrator who sits on the local YMCA board, they agreed to rent space at a discounted rate, and lend the use of its pool for no charge. The county school system provided discounted transportation, and a prominent local bread and snack company donated breakfast foods and snacks. Nominal registration fees allowed kids from all backgrounds to register. Since then, 30 children ages 8 to 12 attend the camp each summer, signing up through ads in newspapers and fliers distributed to all county elementary and middle schools. ENA Injury Prevention/EN CARE programs, Red Cross, the Humane Society's BARK (Be Aware, Responsible, Kind) and other presentations are paired with arts and crafts, swimming, bowling, and field trips to local aquariums, museums, and science centers. Thirty to 45-minute learning sessions are taught by ED nurses, respiratory therapists, and local paramedic students, who receive clinical hours in return for their service. Audiovisual presentations and question-and-answer time are reinforced with additional camp activities. Brain and spinal cord injury presentations, for example, are followed by projects such as having campers construct helmets and neck protection for eggs, then dropping the eggs to see which ones do not break. To reinforce bike safety, campers practice skills at an outdoor bike rodeo. Practicing on mannequins reinforces newly learned CPR and safety/first aid skills, while creating beaded neurons helps reinforce what happens inside the brain and spinal cord after an injury. Daily review sessions and group contests strengthen learning at the end of each day. On the last day of camp, parents view educational skits and a slide show of camp activities.

Outcomes: An overwhelming response to registration, long waiting lists, and many repeat campers attest to the Camp's success, as does the staff's positive attitude and frequent requests to volunteer. As we enter our sixth year this summer, we will have served 180 campers. With our upgrade in 2003, to a Level II trauma center, an infusion of state funds has allowed us to expand the camp's activities, and in the future we hope to extend the program to children in other counties. To date, we have been unable to measure whether the program has reduced injury, but we might conduct follow-up behavioral surveys and/or track ED visits in the future.

Recommendations: Emergency care providers can help stop injuries to children before they happen, by ensuring communities have access to adequate education. Programs that combine fun and learning, such as Camp Safety Zone, can make lessons more memorable. With good planning, organization, and networking - both within and outside the organization, emergency departments can develop similar programs. As long as there are children, there will be injuries. Emergency nurses must work to ensure that many of them never occur.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTaming the Wild Beasts, Averting Disaster: Camp Safety Zoneen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162657-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Taming the Wild Beasts, Averting Disaster: Camp Safety Zone</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Godwin, Robin M., RN, BSN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">John D. Archbold Memorial Hospital, Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Director ? Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">915 Gordon Ave., Thomasville, GA, 31792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(229) 228-8049</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rgodwin@archbold.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Injury Prevention Poster] Injury Prevention Topic: Unintentional injury kills more children 14 years of age and under than any other cause, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Emergency nurses are in an ideal position to help prevent such injuries. For years, emergency department (ED) staff at this state-designated trauma center in southwest Georgia has provided ENA Injury Prevention/EN CARE training and presentations to local schools on a range of topics - from bicycle and motor vehicle safety to alcohol and drug awareness. We felt we could do more, and in 2001, Camp Safety Zone was born.<br/><br/>Implementation: The idea for the camp was conceived and developed by ED staff in December 2000. The idea came naturally and focuses entirely on injury prevention. Several staff had completed ENA Injury Prevention/EN CARE training and some had experience working with children at summer camps. Camp Safety Zone opened in July 2001, operating on a budget of less than $1,000, pieced together from various ED funds and donations from community organizations. With the help of one of an administrator who sits on the local YMCA board, they agreed to rent space at a discounted rate, and lend the use of its pool for no charge. The county school system provided discounted transportation, and a prominent local bread and snack company donated breakfast foods and snacks. Nominal registration fees allowed kids from all backgrounds to register. Since then, 30 children ages 8 to 12 attend the camp each summer, signing up through ads in newspapers and fliers distributed to all county elementary and middle schools. ENA Injury Prevention/EN CARE programs, Red Cross, the Humane Society's BARK (Be Aware, Responsible, Kind) and other presentations are paired with arts and crafts, swimming, bowling, and field trips to local aquariums, museums, and science centers. Thirty to 45-minute learning sessions are taught by ED nurses, respiratory therapists, and local paramedic students, who receive clinical hours in return for their service. Audiovisual presentations and question-and-answer time are reinforced with additional camp activities. Brain and spinal cord injury presentations, for example, are followed by projects such as having campers construct helmets and neck protection for eggs, then dropping the eggs to see which ones do not break. To reinforce bike safety, campers practice skills at an outdoor bike rodeo. Practicing on mannequins reinforces newly learned CPR and safety/first aid skills, while creating beaded neurons helps reinforce what happens inside the brain and spinal cord after an injury. Daily review sessions and group contests strengthen learning at the end of each day. On the last day of camp, parents view educational skits and a slide show of camp activities. <br/><br/>Outcomes: An overwhelming response to registration, long waiting lists, and many repeat campers attest to the Camp's success, as does the staff's positive attitude and frequent requests to volunteer. As we enter our sixth year this summer, we will have served 180 campers. With our upgrade in 2003, to a Level II trauma center, an infusion of state funds has allowed us to expand the camp's activities, and in the future we hope to extend the program to children in other counties. To date, we have been unable to measure whether the program has reduced injury, but we might conduct follow-up behavioral surveys and/or track ED visits in the future.<br/><br/>Recommendations: Emergency care providers can help stop injuries to children before they happen, by ensuring communities have access to adequate education. Programs that combine fun and learning, such as Camp Safety Zone, can make lessons more memorable. With good planning, organization, and networking - both within and outside the organization, emergency departments can develop similar programs. As long as there are children, there will be injuries. Emergency nurses must work to ensure that many of them never occur.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:31:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:31:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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