2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162665
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pediatric Falls from Bed at Home Result in Significant Injury
Abstract:
Pediatric Falls from Bed at Home Result in Significant Injury
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Niedbala, Deborah K., RN, MSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Hospital of Michigan
Title:Coordinator, Trauma/Burn Programs
Contact Address:3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA
Contact Telephone:(313) 993-2602
Co-Authors:Sue Jane Smith, RN, MSN; Scott Langenburg, MD
[Research Poster] Purpose: Preventable injury in the home is a significant source of unintentional injury for children. Falling from the bed is a commonplace source of injury in children. The purpose of this study is to ascertain the severity of injury sustained when a child falls from bed at home.

Design: Quantitative retrospective review of trauma registry.

Setting: This study was conducted at an urban, pediatric, Level I trauma center.

Sample: All patients from birth to 18 years of age, who were admitted after a fall from bed at their home between 2003 and 2006 were included.

Methodology: 2871 patients were admitted to the pediatric trauma center during the study period underwent retrospective trauma registry review. Of these, 66 patients met the criteria for inclusion in this study and underwent further review.

Results: Of the 66 patients, 68% fell out of a bed, 29% fell out of a bunk bed, and 7% fell out of a crib. The admission distribution by quarter year is: first quarter 25%; second quarter 32%; third quarter 26% and fourth quarter 15%. The average age was 30 months (range = 1 month - 10 years) of whom 34 were boys and 32 were girls. 40% were transferred to the trauma center from other emergency departments. All were admitted to the trauma service; 69% were hospitalized for observation and 31% were admitted for an average length hospital stay of 4.6 days. 70% of admitted patients, required an operation . The injuries, of which some patients had more than one (13%), were supracondylar humorous fracture 41%, head 35%, femur fracture 21%, miscellaneous 14%. 19% of admitted patients had a suspected child abuse or neglect report filed upon admission. Within this subgroup of patients who were suspected victims of child abuse or neglect, 93% had a chief complaint of ?falling? from the bed; 7% jumping from the bunk bed. The average age was 15 months; (median = 9 months; range = 1 month - 3 years; nine were younger than 12 months). The injuries were (23% of patients sustained more than one injury): 38% femur fractures, 38% skull fractures and/or subdural hematoma, 15% supracondylar humerous fracture, 23% other boney fractures.

Conclusions: The injuries sustained by these patients required hospitalization and most needed an operation. Falling from bed is a source of significant injury for children. Education is needed to ensure that a child's bed is placed in the lowest possible position, a side rail is used to keep young sleepers from rolling out, and that supervision is heightened to ensure that the bed is used for sleep, not play. Infants who reportedly fall out of bed and sustain a significant injury should raise suspicion of non-accidental trauma until ruled out. Non-trauma center nursing staff needs to use a high degree of suspicion upon initial triage to expedite the diagnoses of significant injuries and transfer to a pediatric trauma center. Due to the greater opportunity for initial treatment at non-trauma centers, pediatric trauma centers need to establish a partnership with them that will enhance nursing education and expedite the referral and transportation of patients to definitive care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePediatric Falls from Bed at Home Result in Significant Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162665-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pediatric Falls from Bed at Home Result in Significant Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Niedbala, Deborah K., RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Hospital of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Coordinator, Trauma/Burn Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(313) 993-2602</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dniedbal@dmc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue Jane Smith, RN, MSN; Scott Langenburg, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Poster] Purpose: Preventable injury in the home is a significant source of unintentional injury for children. Falling from the bed is a commonplace source of injury in children. The purpose of this study is to ascertain the severity of injury sustained when a child falls from bed at home.<br/><br/>Design: Quantitative retrospective review of trauma registry. <br/><br/>Setting: This study was conducted at an urban, pediatric, Level I trauma center. <br/><br/>Sample: All patients from birth to 18 years of age, who were admitted after a fall from bed at their home between 2003 and 2006 were included. <br/><br/>Methodology: 2871 patients were admitted to the pediatric trauma center during the study period underwent retrospective trauma registry review. Of these, 66 patients met the criteria for inclusion in this study and underwent further review. <br/><br/>Results: Of the 66 patients, 68% fell out of a bed, 29% fell out of a bunk bed, and 7% fell out of a crib. The admission distribution by quarter year is: first quarter 25%; second quarter 32%; third quarter 26% and fourth quarter 15%. The average age was 30 months (range = 1 month - 10 years) of whom 34 were boys and 32 were girls. 40% were transferred to the trauma center from other emergency departments. All were admitted to the trauma service; 69% were hospitalized for observation and 31% were admitted for an average length hospital stay of 4.6 days. 70% of admitted patients, required an operation . The injuries, of which some patients had more than one (13%), were supracondylar humorous fracture 41%, head 35%, femur fracture 21%, miscellaneous 14%. 19% of admitted patients had a suspected child abuse or neglect report filed upon admission. Within this subgroup of patients who were suspected victims of child abuse or neglect, 93% had a chief complaint of ?falling? from the bed; 7% jumping from the bunk bed. The average age was 15 months; (median = 9 months; range = 1 month - 3 years; nine were younger than 12 months). The injuries were (23% of patients sustained more than one injury): 38% femur fractures, 38% skull fractures and/or subdural hematoma, 15% supracondylar humerous fracture, 23% other boney fractures. <br/><br/>Conclusions: The injuries sustained by these patients required hospitalization and most needed an operation. Falling from bed is a source of significant injury for children. Education is needed to ensure that a child's bed is placed in the lowest possible position, a side rail is used to keep young sleepers from rolling out, and that supervision is heightened to ensure that the bed is used for sleep, not play. Infants who reportedly fall out of bed and sustain a significant injury should raise suspicion of non-accidental trauma until ruled out. Non-trauma center nursing staff needs to use a high degree of suspicion upon initial triage to expedite the diagnoses of significant injuries and transfer to a pediatric trauma center. Due to the greater opportunity for initial treatment at non-trauma centers, pediatric trauma centers need to establish a partnership with them that will enhance nursing education and expedite the referral and transportation of patients to definitive care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:32:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:32:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.