2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162670
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Kids Teaching Kids to be Safe
Abstract:
Kids Teaching Kids to be Safe
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Rosenthal, Kristin, MEd, CHES, CPST
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Hospital of Michigan
Title:Coordinator, Injury Prevention Outreach
Contact Address:3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA
Contact Telephone:(313) 745-0072
Co-Authors:Joann Moss, BBA; Sue Smith, RN, MSN
[Injury Prevention Poster] Injury Prevention Topic: In 2000, emergency departments (ED) across the country treated nearly 10 million children ages 18 years and under for unintentional injury. For years, firefighters, police, and others who serve the community have tried to keep children safe by teaching prevention in the school. However, budget cuts and changes in the local economy have reduced their availability and new sources of educators must be found. In 2000, this facility developed the Trauma Related Injury Prevention (TRIP) Program that now coordinates injury prevention education for 27,000 children and adults in 98 different elementary schools (ES) and children?s programs in the Detroit area. One of the new and promising TRIP programs is "Kids Teaching Kids to be Safe" (KTK 2 B Safe). This multifaceted program educates and trains high school (HS) students to teach ES students how to prevent injuries. High school students are more receptive to education when they see themselves as part of the solution, instead of part of the problem. Data on emergency department admissions guided us in selecting the first two KTK 2 B Safe topics: motor vehicle safety and how to dial 911.

Implementation: TRIP identifies HS students from the same communities as the elementary school it teaches. High schools choose the student participants and a HS representative works with the TRIP coordinator to identify when and where the students will meet, at which elementary school they will teach, when they will teach, and how they will get to the elementary school. The TRIP coordinator identifies and coordinates presentations by community partners (e.g., police officers, ED nurses and doctors, and paramedics) who speak to the HS students about practicing safety and the outcomes when prevention is ignored. HS educators have the opportunity to ask questions, which increase their personal knowledge and ability to teach ES students. The "Motor Vehicle Safety" program was taught by two trained HS student educators to 360 ES students during the summer of 2005. The "How to Call 911" study was conducted as a Kiwanis Key Club service project. Twenty-five Arabic-speaking student educators taught 300 Arabic-speaking ES students and translated prevention materials into Arabic which ES students took home to reinforce learning and share with their families. Elementary schools completed a five-question pre-test to determine their baseline level of knowledge and a five-question post-test to gauge the effectiveness of the HS student educators. HS students completed a post-program six-question self-evaluation and interview with the TRIP coordinator to determine their level of learning as well.

Outcomes: The findings suggest that HS students can learn and effectively communicate injury prevention information to younger students and that ES students retain information taught by HS students. Mean motor vehicle pre- and post-test scores for ES students were 29 and 77.1, respectively, representing a 166% increase in knowledge, while 911 pre- and post-test scores were 47.22 and 91.66, respectively, representing a 94% increase in knowledge. As for HS students, a post-program self-evaluation and interview demonstrated an increased knowledge in life-saving strategies, the development of leadership and communication skills, and evidence of serving as positive role models to younger students. One interesting finding was that student educators reported knowing more about the importance of wearing a seatbelt and said they had urged others to wear a seat belt and made certain all passengers in the vehicle wore theirs as well.

Recommendations: Programs like KTK 2 B Safe demonstrate the benefits of thinking creatively when traditional means of educating children in injury prevention are not readily available. KTK 2 B Safe is an innovative, cost-effective method that at once, teaches ES and HS students how to stay safe. Emergency nurses can turn their concern for the millions of children arriving in the emergency department each year into practical ideas that keep children out of the emergency department in the first place.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKids Teaching Kids to be Safeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162670-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Kids Teaching Kids to be Safe</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rosenthal, Kristin, MEd, CHES, CPST</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Hospital of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Coordinator, Injury Prevention Outreach</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(313) 745-0072</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">krosenth@dmc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joann Moss, BBA; Sue Smith, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Injury Prevention Poster] Injury Prevention Topic: In 2000, emergency departments (ED) across the country treated nearly 10 million children ages 18 years and under for unintentional injury. For years, firefighters, police, and others who serve the community have tried to keep children safe by teaching prevention in the school. However, budget cuts and changes in the local economy have reduced their availability and new sources of educators must be found. In 2000, this facility developed the Trauma Related Injury Prevention (TRIP) Program that now coordinates injury prevention education for 27,000 children and adults in 98 different elementary schools (ES) and children?s programs in the Detroit area. One of the new and promising TRIP programs is &quot;Kids Teaching Kids to be Safe&quot; (KTK 2 B Safe). This multifaceted program educates and trains high school (HS) students to teach ES students how to prevent injuries. High school students are more receptive to education when they see themselves as part of the solution, instead of part of the problem. Data on emergency department admissions guided us in selecting the first two KTK 2 B Safe topics: motor vehicle safety and how to dial 911.<br/><br/>Implementation: TRIP identifies HS students from the same communities as the elementary school it teaches. High schools choose the student participants and a HS representative works with the TRIP coordinator to identify when and where the students will meet, at which elementary school they will teach, when they will teach, and how they will get to the elementary school. The TRIP coordinator identifies and coordinates presentations by community partners (e.g., police officers, ED nurses and doctors, and paramedics) who speak to the HS students about practicing safety and the outcomes when prevention is ignored. HS educators have the opportunity to ask questions, which increase their personal knowledge and ability to teach ES students. The &quot;Motor Vehicle Safety&quot; program was taught by two trained HS student educators to 360 ES students during the summer of 2005. The &quot;How to Call 911&quot; study was conducted as a Kiwanis Key Club service project. Twenty-five Arabic-speaking student educators taught 300 Arabic-speaking ES students and translated prevention materials into Arabic which ES students took home to reinforce learning and share with their families. Elementary schools completed a five-question pre-test to determine their baseline level of knowledge and a five-question post-test to gauge the effectiveness of the HS student educators. HS students completed a post-program six-question self-evaluation and interview with the TRIP coordinator to determine their level of learning as well.<br/><br/>Outcomes: The findings suggest that HS students can learn and effectively communicate injury prevention information to younger students and that ES students retain information taught by HS students. Mean motor vehicle pre- and post-test scores for ES students were 29 and 77.1, respectively, representing a 166% increase in knowledge, while 911 pre- and post-test scores were 47.22 and 91.66, respectively, representing a 94% increase in knowledge. As for HS students, a post-program self-evaluation and interview demonstrated an increased knowledge in life-saving strategies, the development of leadership and communication skills, and evidence of serving as positive role models to younger students. One interesting finding was that student educators reported knowing more about the importance of wearing a seatbelt and said they had urged others to wear a seat belt and made certain all passengers in the vehicle wore theirs as well.<br/><br/>Recommendations: Programs like KTK 2 B Safe demonstrate the benefits of thinking creatively when traditional means of educating children in injury prevention are not readily available. KTK 2 B Safe is an innovative, cost-effective method that at once, teaches ES and HS students how to stay safe. Emergency nurses can turn their concern for the millions of children arriving in the emergency department each year into practical ideas that keep children out of the emergency department in the first place.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:32:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:32:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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