2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162673
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Local Data to Target Injury Prevention Programming
Abstract:
Using Local Data to Target Injury Prevention Programming
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Schooley, Carolyn, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Mercy Medical Center - Safe Kids Stark County
Title:Trauma Nurse Coordinator
Contact Address:1320 Mercy Drive, Canton, OH, 44708, USA
Contact Telephone:(330) 489-1183
Co-Authors: Amanda (Eckelberry) Kelly, BA, CHES; Joyce Himebaugh, RN; Debbie Sharkey; Beth Canfield-Simbro, PhD, MPH, BS, CHES; Mike Abrams; Steve Gronow; Laurie Weaver, RN, BSN, EMT-P; Kay Conley, BS, CHES; Lisa Tavallali, MBA; Danette Lund
[Injury Prevention Presentation] Injury Prevention Topic: Unintentional injury is the number one killer of America's children. It has been shown that injury prevention initiatives can help to keep our children safe from harm. However, some programs do not impact injuries because they are aimed at the wrong population, geographical area, age or gender. The purpose of this project was to conduct a thorough investigation into the causes of injury in this county to more effectively select appropriate injury prevention programming based on local data.

Implementation: In 2004, a subcommittee of Safe Kids Stark County was formed with nurses and health professionals from each of the five (5) hospitals and other interested parties. The hospitals provided the E-codes (cause of injury) for all pediatric patients (age <14 years) seen in their emergency departments. The aggregate data was compiled and reported by age, sex, zip code, e-code, and date of injury. The top twelve causes were further analyzed and profiled in an annual report with text, charts and graphs. With grant funds we were able to distribute the annual reports throughout the community. Educational meetings were held at each of the hospitals to further disseminate and analyze the data.

Outcomes: A pilot was done for the 2002 data which included July through December and only 3 of the hospitals. The 2003, 2004, 2005 reports have been completed. In progress are the 2006 and a four-year trend report which will be available soon. The reports have been made available to 150 entities that provide services to children, e.g., hospitals, schools, EMS, legislators, and service organizations. The report has also been made available online. The availability of the reports raised awareness of this critical health problem and provided data upon which injury prevention efforts should be based. Programs are now being targeted to meet the specific needs of the community and reduce injuries. For example, "assaults/abuse" made the top 12 for the first time in 2005, so the committee is formulating a curriculum aimed at this problem and age group. Another example of putting the data to use occurred when a local group of medical students learned that "falls" was the most common cause of injury. They interviewed several health care professionals and parents then created a safety plan that targeted different strategies for the various age groups that encounter falls.

Recommendations: It is best practice to have supporting data for any change or new program upon which you are investing time. This project has provided the community with valuable data to begin chipping away at our children?s number one killer. By collaborating and researching local injury data, injury prevention programming has the reached a new level in specifically targeting prevalent causes. As a real world example of using simple data to tackle a problem, this could be easily adapted to a variety of situations. The use of aggregate data negates the need for intricate statistics, and is very manageable for anyone interested in identifying trends and making changes for the better.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Local Data to Target Injury Prevention Programmingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162673-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Local Data to Target Injury Prevention Programming</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schooley, Carolyn, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mercy Medical Center - Safe Kids Stark County</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Trauma Nurse Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1320 Mercy Drive, Canton, OH, 44708, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(330) 489-1183</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Carolyn.schooley@csauh.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value"> Amanda (Eckelberry) Kelly, BA, CHES; Joyce Himebaugh, RN; Debbie Sharkey; Beth Canfield-Simbro, PhD, MPH, BS, CHES; Mike Abrams; Steve Gronow; Laurie Weaver, RN, BSN, EMT-P; Kay Conley, BS, CHES; Lisa Tavallali, MBA; Danette Lund</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Injury Prevention Presentation] Injury Prevention Topic: Unintentional injury is the number one killer of America's children. It has been shown that injury prevention initiatives can help to keep our children safe from harm. However, some programs do not impact injuries because they are aimed at the wrong population, geographical area, age or gender. The purpose of this project was to conduct a thorough investigation into the causes of injury in this county to more effectively select appropriate injury prevention programming based on local data.<br/><br/>Implementation: In 2004, a subcommittee of Safe Kids Stark County was formed with nurses and health professionals from each of the five (5) hospitals and other interested parties. The hospitals provided the E-codes (cause of injury) for all pediatric patients (age &lt;14 years) seen in their emergency departments. The aggregate data was compiled and reported by age, sex, zip code, e-code, and date of injury. The top twelve causes were further analyzed and profiled in an annual report with text, charts and graphs. With grant funds we were able to distribute the annual reports throughout the community. Educational meetings were held at each of the hospitals to further disseminate and analyze the data.<br/><br/>Outcomes: A pilot was done for the 2002 data which included July through December and only 3 of the hospitals. The 2003, 2004, 2005 reports have been completed. In progress are the 2006 and a four-year trend report which will be available soon. The reports have been made available to 150 entities that provide services to children, e.g., hospitals, schools, EMS, legislators, and service organizations. The report has also been made available online. The availability of the reports raised awareness of this critical health problem and provided data upon which injury prevention efforts should be based. Programs are now being targeted to meet the specific needs of the community and reduce injuries. For example, &quot;assaults/abuse&quot; made the top 12 for the first time in 2005, so the committee is formulating a curriculum aimed at this problem and age group. Another example of putting the data to use occurred when a local group of medical students learned that &quot;falls&quot; was the most common cause of injury. They interviewed several health care professionals and parents then created a safety plan that targeted different strategies for the various age groups that encounter falls.<br/><br/>Recommendations: It is best practice to have supporting data for any change or new program upon which you are investing time. This project has provided the community with valuable data to begin chipping away at our children?s number one killer. By collaborating and researching local injury data, injury prevention programming has the reached a new level in specifically targeting prevalent causes. As a real world example of using simple data to tackle a problem, this could be easily adapted to a variety of situations. The use of aggregate data negates the need for intricate statistics, and is very manageable for anyone interested in identifying trends and making changes for the better.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:32:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:32:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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