2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162680
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Providing Child Passenger Safety Education: Hospitals Get Involved
Abstract:
Providing Child Passenger Safety Education: Hospitals Get Involved
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2007
Author:Wilson, Mary Ellen, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:EMSC Program @ Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems
Title:Child Passenger Safety Project Coordinator
Contact Address:653 West Pratt St., Baltimore, MD, 21201, USA
Contact Telephone:(410) 706-1758
Co-Authors:Cynthia Wright-Johnson, MSN, RNC
[Injury Prevention Poster] Injury Prevention Topic: Motor vehicle crashes kill more children 14 years and under than any other unintentional injury-related death in the United States. Yet the installation and proper use of child safety seats and restraints can prevent such injuries and save lives. Hospitals can help by educating families before children are discharged from their care. A survey conducted by Maryland Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) in 2002, found that most acute care hospitals in the state lacked appropriate discharge policies for transporting newborns and young children in motor vehicles, provided inconsistent or out-of-date child passenger safety (CPS) information to families, and infrequently offered CPS training for hospital staff, if at all. In response to these findings, Maryland EMSC established the CPS Hospital Project. Currently in its sixth year of Maryland Highway Safety Office funding, the CPS Hospital Project helps hospitals develop "best practice" CPS education and discharge policies to ensure families receive up-to-date information on the proper installation and use of child safety seats and restraints. The overall goal of the project is to bring current CPS education to all emergency departments (EDs) and relevant healthcare staff at every acute care and pediatric rehabilitation hospital in the State of Maryland.

Implementation: Implementation of CPS education and training began by identifying a contact person at each of Maryland's 47 hospitals that treat children under age eight, either in the emergency department, pediatric department, nursery, or neonatal intensive care unit. This person serves as a conduit for launching and strengthening CPS hospital policies and procedures and helps builds partnerships between hospital staff and CPS liaisons - the certified CPS technicians and instructors who educate staff. Hospital contacts stay updated on the latest CPS practices through current educational materials received from traffic safety and local health department programs, CPS bulletin updates, educational offerings, and opportunities to participate in CPS initiatives. CPS liaisons may visit hospitals to review CPS materials, provide educational programs to hospital staff, participate in hospital CPS initiatives, or serve as a resource when child passenger safety expertise is needed, for example, when writing CPS objectives into annual nursing unit clinical competencies. Through these efforts, CPS liaisons help hospitals develop best practice guidelines and procedures on how to disseminate CPS information to families and how to train designated nursery, pediatrics, and ED staff in these practices. The project funds continuing education for liaisons and sponsors an annual CPS conference call each February for both hospital contacts and liaisons to provide them with updates and information on new CPS initiatives. CPS media materials and a dynamic CPS Hospital project Web site linked to participating hospitals further boost public outreach.

Outcomes: Since its inception five years ago, the CPS Hospital Project has greatly facilitated the development and implementation of best practice guidelines and procedures for child passenger safety in hospitals across the state of Maryland. During the 2004-2006 grant period, the project provided nine two- and four-hour workshops on CPS topics at facilities within the state's five EMS regions. Nursing liaisons have been established in all 46 acute care and two pediatric rehabilitation hospitals. More Maryland hospitals now offer CPS training and standardized courses to staff members than ever before and, unlike in years past, CPS has become part of clinical competencies for nursery and pediatric staff. As a result, healthcare facilities across the state routinely provide up-to-date materials on discharge, and CPS topics are discussed on grand rounds, at bedside, and through involvement with community outreach programs.

Recommendations: When "teachable moments" happen in the unexpected ED visit, emergency nurses can use them to serve as role models for adults caring for children at home and at school. Programs such as the CPS Hospital Project keep nurses updated on how to protect children from motor vehicle injury and provide parents with tangible CPS resources to reinforce these practices at home. Participating in community educational events, alongside local health departments and highway traffic coordinators, further expands ED nurses' reach, gaining both local and media support for the program.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProviding Child Passenger Safety Education: Hospitals Get Involveden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162680-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Providing Child Passenger Safety Education: Hospitals Get Involved</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilson, Mary Ellen, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">EMSC Program @ Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Child Passenger Safety Project Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">653 West Pratt St., Baltimore, MD, 21201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(410) 706-1758</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mewilson@miemss.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cynthia Wright-Johnson, MSN, RNC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Injury Prevention Poster] Injury Prevention Topic: Motor vehicle crashes kill more children 14 years and under than any other unintentional injury-related death in the United States. Yet the installation and proper use of child safety seats and restraints can prevent such injuries and save lives. Hospitals can help by educating families before children are discharged from their care. A survey conducted by Maryland Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) in 2002, found that most acute care hospitals in the state lacked appropriate discharge policies for transporting newborns and young children in motor vehicles, provided inconsistent or out-of-date child passenger safety (CPS) information to families, and infrequently offered CPS training for hospital staff, if at all. In response to these findings, Maryland EMSC established the CPS Hospital Project. Currently in its sixth year of Maryland Highway Safety Office funding, the CPS Hospital Project helps hospitals develop &quot;best practice&quot; CPS education and discharge policies to ensure families receive up-to-date information on the proper installation and use of child safety seats and restraints. The overall goal of the project is to bring current CPS education to all emergency departments (EDs) and relevant healthcare staff at every acute care and pediatric rehabilitation hospital in the State of Maryland. <br/><br/>Implementation: Implementation of CPS education and training began by identifying a contact person at each of Maryland's 47 hospitals that treat children under age eight, either in the emergency department, pediatric department, nursery, or neonatal intensive care unit. This person serves as a conduit for launching and strengthening CPS hospital policies and procedures and helps builds partnerships between hospital staff and CPS liaisons - the certified CPS technicians and instructors who educate staff. Hospital contacts stay updated on the latest CPS practices through current educational materials received from traffic safety and local health department programs, CPS bulletin updates, educational offerings, and opportunities to participate in CPS initiatives. CPS liaisons may visit hospitals to review CPS materials, provide educational programs to hospital staff, participate in hospital CPS initiatives, or serve as a resource when child passenger safety expertise is needed, for example, when writing CPS objectives into annual nursing unit clinical competencies. Through these efforts, CPS liaisons help hospitals develop best practice guidelines and procedures on how to disseminate CPS information to families and how to train designated nursery, pediatrics, and ED staff in these practices. The project funds continuing education for liaisons and sponsors an annual CPS conference call each February for both hospital contacts and liaisons to provide them with updates and information on new CPS initiatives. CPS media materials and a dynamic CPS Hospital project Web site linked to participating hospitals further boost public outreach.<br/><br/>Outcomes: Since its inception five years ago, the CPS Hospital Project has greatly facilitated the development and implementation of best practice guidelines and procedures for child passenger safety in hospitals across the state of Maryland. During the 2004-2006 grant period, the project provided nine two- and four-hour workshops on CPS topics at facilities within the state's five EMS regions. Nursing liaisons have been established in all 46 acute care and two pediatric rehabilitation hospitals. More Maryland hospitals now offer CPS training and standardized courses to staff members than ever before and, unlike in years past, CPS has become part of clinical competencies for nursery and pediatric staff. As a result, healthcare facilities across the state routinely provide up-to-date materials on discharge, and CPS topics are discussed on grand rounds, at bedside, and through involvement with community outreach programs. <br/><br/>Recommendations: When &quot;teachable moments&quot; happen in the unexpected ED visit, emergency nurses can use them to serve as role models for adults caring for children at home and at school. Programs such as the CPS Hospital Project keep nurses updated on how to protect children from motor vehicle injury and provide parents with tangible CPS resources to reinforce these practices at home. Participating in community educational events, alongside local health departments and highway traffic coordinators, further expands ED nurses' reach, gaining both local and media support for the program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:32:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:32:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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