2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162694
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hospital Based Emergency Technician Courses; Is it Worth the Effort?
Abstract:
Hospital Based Emergency Technician Courses; Is it Worth the Effort?
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2008
Author:Fonkert, Sandra, RN, MSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview
Title:Clinical Staff Nurse
Contact Address:MMC 710, 500 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455-, USA
Contact Telephone:(612) 273-2700
Purpose: The emergency departments in an academic based medical center were faced with the dilemma of how to provide their paraprofessional staff with Emergency Room Technician (ERT) education. Paraprofessionals employed by this hospital could be hired as a certified nursing assistant, but were required to complete an ERT course within a designated time frame. Sending staff to a technical college course paying for both their tuition and 56 hours of classroom time was a costly alternative. ED management elected to attempt a 2 day hospital based program utilizing hospital staff and educational resources. Due to the demand created by this course throughout the entire health care system, enrollment was opened to any qualified candidate who was employed in any emergency department within the 6 hospital organization.

Design: This is a staff development project.

Setting: A 600-bed, 2-campus urban medical center in the upper Midwest. The 2 emergency departments had 45,315 patient visits in 2006.

Participants: The participants are employees who hold a basic nursing assistant certification or are currently enrolled as a student at an accredited school of nursing. Instructors are RNs with previous teaching experience or staff employed as ERTs.

Methods: The course was designed by utilizing the teaching-learning process. Assessment of the curricular component was accomplished by reviewing student attributes, ERT job descriptions and duties, and ENA's Emergency Care Curriculum. After reviewing assessment data, course content and objectives were developed. Cognitive content consisted of basic anatomy, physiology, medical terms, and pathophysiology. Affective content consisted of stressing organizational values, customer service and appropriate attitudes. Psychomotor behaviors were developed to include all the skill sets that are within the ERT scope of practice. Preparation for the course consisted of developing LOIs, compilation of learning packets, assigning relevant subject readings, creating an agenda, selecting instructors, and configuring time frame rotation matrices. Using adult learning theory, course content was presented through didactic lectures, patient centered scenarios, and skills demonstration. Learners were able to apply their learned skills immediately by the use of realistic, "hands-on" training. The evaluation of student learning was performed by using formative strategies. First, students were evaluated using inquisition techniques: questioning students regarding when and why a specific intervention would be performed and/or how certain concepts might be applied. Secondly a skills-set evaluation tool was utilized. Students mastering the desired elements of a skill were "signed off" by instructors. Students were able to evaluate the course, its content, and the instructors by completing a course evaluation tool.

Results: Two sets of classes have been presented. 35 students completed the course requirements and were issued certificates of completion. Course evaluation summaries yielded an overall program evaluation average of 4.42 (88 %) on a 1 to 5 Likert scale. A hospital based ERT course provided the students with a standardized core content ensuring that all ERT staff received the same knowledge base, core values, and skills training thus enhancing safer patient care. An estimated $19,000 was saved in tuition expenses and an estimated $13, 860 was saved in employee salaries. According to course evaluations, student ratings and satisfaction were overwhelmingly high and previous student are requesting that their newly hired co-workers have the opportunity to take the same course. ERTs completing the course are viewed as more competent and confident by their RN and MD counterparts.

Recommendations: For 2007, the agenda has incorporated feedback suggesting strengthening the course momentum into the second half of Day 2. This has been accomplished as the agenda moves from basic ERT skills to the application of advanced skills in mock "code blue" and Trauma Team activation scenarios. In lieu of "signing off" multiple skill sets forms, return demonstrations are expected and students are expected to complete a "fill-in-the blank" review. This review will be evaluated and returned to students prior to the awarding of completion certificates.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHospital Based Emergency Technician Courses; Is it Worth the Effort?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162694-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hospital Based Emergency Technician Courses; Is it Worth the Effort?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fonkert, Sandra, RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MMC 710, 500 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455-, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(612) 273-2700</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sfonker1@fairview.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The emergency departments in an academic based medical center were faced with the dilemma of how to provide their paraprofessional staff with Emergency Room Technician (ERT) education. Paraprofessionals employed by this hospital could be hired as a certified nursing assistant, but were required to complete an ERT course within a designated time frame. Sending staff to a technical college course paying for both their tuition and 56 hours of classroom time was a costly alternative. ED management elected to attempt a 2 day hospital based program utilizing hospital staff and educational resources. Due to the demand created by this course throughout the entire health care system, enrollment was opened to any qualified candidate who was employed in any emergency department within the 6 hospital organization. <br/><br/>Design: This is a staff development project.<br/><br/>Setting: A 600-bed, 2-campus urban medical center in the upper Midwest. The 2 emergency departments had 45,315 patient visits in 2006. <br/><br/>Participants: The participants are employees who hold a basic nursing assistant certification or are currently enrolled as a student at an accredited school of nursing. Instructors are RNs with previous teaching experience or staff employed as ERTs. <br/><br/>Methods: The course was designed by utilizing the teaching-learning process. Assessment of the curricular component was accomplished by reviewing student attributes, ERT job descriptions and duties, and ENA's Emergency Care Curriculum. After reviewing assessment data, course content and objectives were developed. Cognitive content consisted of basic anatomy, physiology, medical terms, and pathophysiology. Affective content consisted of stressing organizational values, customer service and appropriate attitudes. Psychomotor behaviors were developed to include all the skill sets that are within the ERT scope of practice. Preparation for the course consisted of developing LOIs, compilation of learning packets, assigning relevant subject readings, creating an agenda, selecting instructors, and configuring time frame rotation matrices. Using adult learning theory, course content was presented through didactic lectures, patient centered scenarios, and skills demonstration. Learners were able to apply their learned skills immediately by the use of realistic, &quot;hands-on&quot; training. The evaluation of student learning was performed by using formative strategies. First, students were evaluated using inquisition techniques: questioning students regarding when and why a specific intervention would be performed and/or how certain concepts might be applied. Secondly a skills-set evaluation tool was utilized. Students mastering the desired elements of a skill were &quot;signed off&quot; by instructors. Students were able to evaluate the course, its content, and the instructors by completing a course evaluation tool. <br/><br/>Results: Two sets of classes have been presented. 35 students completed the course requirements and were issued certificates of completion. Course evaluation summaries yielded an overall program evaluation average of 4.42 (88 %) on a 1 to 5 Likert scale. A hospital based ERT course provided the students with a standardized core content ensuring that all ERT staff received the same knowledge base, core values, and skills training thus enhancing safer patient care. An estimated $19,000 was saved in tuition expenses and an estimated $13, 860 was saved in employee salaries. According to course evaluations, student ratings and satisfaction were overwhelmingly high and previous student are requesting that their newly hired co-workers have the opportunity to take the same course. ERTs completing the course are viewed as more competent and confident by their RN and MD counterparts.<br/><br/>Recommendations: For 2007, the agenda has incorporated feedback suggesting strengthening the course momentum into the second half of Day 2. This has been accomplished as the agenda moves from basic ERT skills to the application of advanced skills in mock &quot;code blue&quot; and Trauma Team activation scenarios. In lieu of &quot;signing off&quot; multiple skill sets forms, return demonstrations are expected and students are expected to complete a &quot;fill-in-the blank&quot; review. This review will be evaluated and returned to students prior to the awarding of completion certificates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:32:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:32:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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