2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162701
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Five Habits of a Highly Effective Triage System
Abstract:
Five Habits of a Highly Effective Triage System
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2008
Author:Hanson, Ellen, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Exempla Saint Joseph Hospital Denver
Title:Clinical Manager
Contact Address:, Denver, CO, 80218-, USA
Co-Authors:Hazel Marez, RN, MBA/HCM
Purpose: To develop a five level triage system specifically designed to meet the needs of an Emergency Department (ED) that utilizes a variety of nursing skill sets. The triage systems core competency provides the groundwork for evidenced based practice, safety, quality assurance, and departmental growth. It gives the nurses the tools to become proficient and consistent in their critical thinking skills.

Design: The primary management focus was on staff development and quality assurance.

Setting: The project was initiated in a 32 bed (ED) in an urban teaching hospital in a western state with 49,000 visits per year.

Participants/Subjects: All members of the ED were incorporated into the training. This included management, physicians, physician assistants, registered nurses, emergency room technicians, unit coordinators, transporters, and registrars.

Methods: The five level triage systems was created by referencing information from the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA), the Canadian triage system, the Australian triage system, the Manchester triage system, and the Emergency Severity Index. Mandatory staff meetings were conducted and each employee was given a packet that included a triage algorithm that identified the acuity levels, triage guidelines, and a post test. The staff members were provided with examples of patient?s complaints that matched each acuity level and were given an opportunity to assign the acuity and ask questions. The new system was evaluated by concurrent and retrospective chart review.

Results: A comparison of baseline triage data from 2003 to the present indicates that the nurses were 20% more accurate in assessing and assigning acuity levels. The success of the project was evident in the first two years of implementation when the ED had variable nursing practices and required a high number of travelers. The triage tools were used to teach emergency room nurse internship (ERNI) programs which enabled new and in-experienced nurses, to become proficient in assigning the appropriate acuity level. The solid triage foundation allowed for easy integration and implementation of an aggressive hospital wide sepsis program and the accreditation of the chest pain center.

Recommendations: It is critical to have physicians and staff input during the early development stage of the project. Physician and employee involvement will provide peer support and help alleviate criticism that could cause health care providers to inappropriately assign acuities. Providing the employees with continual feedback and education is very important in successfully assessing and assigning patient acuities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFive Habits of a Highly Effective Triage Systemen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162701-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Five Habits of a Highly Effective Triage System</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hanson, Ellen, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Exempla Saint Joseph Hospital Denver</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Denver, CO, 80218-, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hansone@exempla.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hazel Marez, RN, MBA/HCM</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To develop a five level triage system specifically designed to meet the needs of an Emergency Department (ED) that utilizes a variety of nursing skill sets. The triage systems core competency provides the groundwork for evidenced based practice, safety, quality assurance, and departmental growth. It gives the nurses the tools to become proficient and consistent in their critical thinking skills. <br/><br/>Design: The primary management focus was on staff development and quality assurance.<br/><br/>Setting: The project was initiated in a 32 bed (ED) in an urban teaching hospital in a western state with 49,000 visits per year. <br/><br/>Participants/Subjects: All members of the ED were incorporated into the training. This included management, physicians, physician assistants, registered nurses, emergency room technicians, unit coordinators, transporters, and registrars. <br/><br/>Methods: The five level triage systems was created by referencing information from the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA), the Canadian triage system, the Australian triage system, the Manchester triage system, and the Emergency Severity Index. Mandatory staff meetings were conducted and each employee was given a packet that included a triage algorithm that identified the acuity levels, triage guidelines, and a post test. The staff members were provided with examples of patient?s complaints that matched each acuity level and were given an opportunity to assign the acuity and ask questions. The new system was evaluated by concurrent and retrospective chart review. <br/><br/>Results: A comparison of baseline triage data from 2003 to the present indicates that the nurses were 20% more accurate in assessing and assigning acuity levels. The success of the project was evident in the first two years of implementation when the ED had variable nursing practices and required a high number of travelers. The triage tools were used to teach emergency room nurse internship (ERNI) programs which enabled new and in-experienced nurses, to become proficient in assigning the appropriate acuity level. The solid triage foundation allowed for easy integration and implementation of an aggressive hospital wide sepsis program and the accreditation of the chest pain center. <br/><br/>Recommendations: It is critical to have physicians and staff input during the early development stage of the project. Physician and employee involvement will provide peer support and help alleviate criticism that could cause health care providers to inappropriately assign acuities. Providing the employees with continual feedback and education is very important in successfully assessing and assigning patient acuities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:32:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:32:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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