An ED Intervention to Change Smoking Behavior in Households of Smokers with Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162710
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An ED Intervention to Change Smoking Behavior in Households of Smokers with Children
Abstract:
An ED Intervention to Change Smoking Behavior in Households of Smokers with Children
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2001
Author:Perenchio, Carol, RN, ND, FNP, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Sherman Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine
Contact Address:480 E. Broadway Street, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, USA
Contact Telephone:(847) 429-2273
Co-Authors:Michelle McCray, RN, MSN, FNP
Purpose: Children of smokers have more respiratory morbidity throughout childhood than children of nonsmokers. The extent of harm caused by chronic environmental tobacco smoke and its substantial prevalence make smoking cessation a high priority for Ed nursing intervention. This study used the Health Belief Model conceptual framework to evaluate smoking behavior and promote smoking cessation. Design: A prospective descriptive correlational design was used. Setting: A Midwest urban ED/Urgent Care Center with 65,000 annual visits. Sample: A convenience sample of 128 smokers identified in triage were studied over eight weeks. Exclusion criteria included major emergency condition, current therapy for smoking cessation, and/or inability to read English. Methodology: Smokers were assigned to Group 1 (n=63) if they had brought children for treatment of respiratory illness or Group 2 (n=65) if they were from households that did not include children. Consent was obtained prior to study. Generalized attitudes toward smoking, and the likelihood of 12 consequences expected if they either quit or continued to smoke, were rated from ?never? to ?always? on separate 5-point Likert-type scales. The eight-question Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire assessed smokers? degree of dependence. These instruments have established reliability and validity. Sociodemographic questions were also included. Data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics (C2 Square, and t-tests) utilizing SPSS Windows. Confidence levels were set at 95% and statistical significance was set at an alpha level of .05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the groups? reasons for trying to quit smoking. These reasons were: to spend less money (43% vs 37%), effect on interpersonal relationships (19% vs 20%), and health reasons (90% vs. 86%). The group with ill children was more motivated to quit because of cigarette smoke?s effects on their children?s health (49% vs 28%, p = 0.02), and would attempt smoking cessation within 30 days (27% vs 12%, p = 0.06). Demographic characteristics and smoking behavior were fairly similar between groups for mean age, income, and level of education. Both groups were similar in reasons to continue to smoke. Conclusion: In this sample, adult smokers in households with ill children are more likely to be motivated to quit when facing a child?s health-related condition. A legitimate part of emergency nurses? role is to intervene with children?s caregivers who smoke, and use of the Health Belief Model can help evaluate patients? smoking behavior with regard to susceptibility to illness, seriousness of illness, barriers, benefits, and motivation for smoking. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Identify differences in attitudes and beliefs about cigarette smoking between smokers in households with and without children; 2) Explore relationships between the number of cigarettes smoked and reasons to quit or continue smoking; and 3) Describe the antecedent behaviors that promote tobacco use. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn ED Intervention to Change Smoking Behavior in Households of Smokers with Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162710-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An ED Intervention to Change Smoking Behavior in Households of Smokers with Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Perenchio, Carol, RN, ND, FNP, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Sherman Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">480 E. Broadway Street, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(847) 429-2273</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carol.perenchio@shermanhospital.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michelle McCray, RN, MSN, FNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Children of smokers have more respiratory morbidity throughout childhood than children of nonsmokers. The extent of harm caused by chronic environmental tobacco smoke and its substantial prevalence make smoking cessation a high priority for Ed nursing intervention. This study used the Health Belief Model conceptual framework to evaluate smoking behavior and promote smoking cessation. Design: A prospective descriptive correlational design was used. Setting: A Midwest urban ED/Urgent Care Center with 65,000 annual visits. Sample: A convenience sample of 128 smokers identified in triage were studied over eight weeks. Exclusion criteria included major emergency condition, current therapy for smoking cessation, and/or inability to read English. Methodology: Smokers were assigned to Group 1 (n=63) if they had brought children for treatment of respiratory illness or Group 2 (n=65) if they were from households that did not include children. Consent was obtained prior to study. Generalized attitudes toward smoking, and the likelihood of 12 consequences expected if they either quit or continued to smoke, were rated from ?never? to ?always? on separate 5-point Likert-type scales. The eight-question Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire assessed smokers? degree of dependence. These instruments have established reliability and validity. Sociodemographic questions were also included. Data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics (C2 Square, and t-tests) utilizing SPSS Windows. Confidence levels were set at 95% and statistical significance was set at an alpha level of .05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the groups? reasons for trying to quit smoking. These reasons were: to spend less money (43% vs 37%), effect on interpersonal relationships (19% vs 20%), and health reasons (90% vs. 86%). The group with ill children was more motivated to quit because of cigarette smoke?s effects on their children?s health (49% vs 28%, p = 0.02), and would attempt smoking cessation within 30 days (27% vs 12%, p = 0.06). Demographic characteristics and smoking behavior were fairly similar between groups for mean age, income, and level of education. Both groups were similar in reasons to continue to smoke. Conclusion: In this sample, adult smokers in households with ill children are more likely to be motivated to quit when facing a child?s health-related condition. A legitimate part of emergency nurses? role is to intervene with children?s caregivers who smoke, and use of the Health Belief Model can help evaluate patients? smoking behavior with regard to susceptibility to illness, seriousness of illness, barriers, benefits, and motivation for smoking. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Identify differences in attitudes and beliefs about cigarette smoking between smokers in households with and without children; 2) Explore relationships between the number of cigarettes smoked and reasons to quit or continue smoking; and 3) Describe the antecedent behaviors that promote tobacco use. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:32:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:32:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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