2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162711
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evaluation of Nursing Job Satisfaction in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
An Evaluation of Nursing Job Satisfaction in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2001
Author:Presley, Diane, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Medical Center
Contact Address:1201 W. 38th Street, Austin, TX, 78705, USA
Contact Telephone:(512) 324-1031
Co-Authors:Gail Robinson, RN
Purpose: High levels of stress, nursing shortages, the challenge of meeting complex needs for high acuity pediatric and adult patients and their families can threaten job satisfaction and lead to turnover in staff in the Emergency Department (ED). Other contributing factors to stress are: cost containment issues, support services (e.g., laboratory, radiology, housekeeping), lack of professional growth opportunities, lack of recognition for work well done, visibility, support and effectiveness of upper management, as well as the lack of ability to make autonomous decisions related to work life. All these factors can influence nurses? satisfaction with their jobs. The purpose of this study was to explore elements of work environments that impact job satisfaction of the emergency nurse with five years experience or less, and those with greater than 5 years experience. Design: An exploratory descriptive cross-sectional design was utilized. The tool was developed by a Health Care Advisory Board to measure trends of nursing satisfaction and retention. Setting: Data was collected from emergency nurses at four hospitals. Two were not-for-profit: one suburban 150 bed, and one urban 450 bed. Two were for profit: one 261 bed urban and one 135 bed suburban. Sample: A convenience sample was obtained at staff department meetings. The sample consisted of a total of 90 ED nurses; 32 were male, and 58 were female. Average age was 35 ? 44 years. Methodology: Variables measured were support services, professional growth, work intensity, compensation, recognition, effectiveness of management, staff competence, decision-making ability. Results: For overall job satisfaction, 21% were very satisfied, 20.6% were somewhat satisfied, 51% were somewhat dissatisfied, and 7.1% were very dissatisfied. Differences in satisfaction with job attributes were noted between nurses with fewer than five years experience (n=35) and those with five to twenty years experience (n=55). Support Services, < 5 years = 78%, 5-20 years = 63%; Professional Growth, < 5 years = 75%, 5-20 years = 60%; Intensity of Work, < 5 years = 70%, 5-20 years = 61%; Compensation, < 5 years = 75%, 5-20 years = 60%; Recognition, < 5 years 71%, 5-20 years 60%; Effectiveness of Management, < 5 years = 70%, 5-20 years = 62%; Staff Competence, < 5 years = 82%, 5-20 years = 71%; and Decision-Making Ability, < 5 years = 66%, 5-20 years = 71%. Conclusions: Job-related priorities such as recognition, intensity of work, and compensation are paramount for all segments of an ED. Management strategies that empower and support staff to provide patient care may promote satisfaction and retention in EDs. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Understand factors impacting job satisfaction;
2) Identify strategies to increase satisfaction; and 3) Identify factors for retention. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Evaluation of Nursing Job Satisfaction in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162711-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Evaluation of Nursing Job Satisfaction in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Presley, Diane, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1201 W. 38th Street, Austin, TX, 78705, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(512) 324-1031</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Dpresley@Seton.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gail Robinson, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: High levels of stress, nursing shortages, the challenge of meeting complex needs for high acuity pediatric and adult patients and their families can threaten job satisfaction and lead to turnover in staff in the Emergency Department (ED). Other contributing factors to stress are: cost containment issues, support services (e.g., laboratory, radiology, housekeeping), lack of professional growth opportunities, lack of recognition for work well done, visibility, support and effectiveness of upper management, as well as the lack of ability to make autonomous decisions related to work life. All these factors can influence nurses? satisfaction with their jobs. The purpose of this study was to explore elements of work environments that impact job satisfaction of the emergency nurse with five years experience or less, and those with greater than 5 years experience. Design: An exploratory descriptive cross-sectional design was utilized. The tool was developed by a Health Care Advisory Board to measure trends of nursing satisfaction and retention. Setting: Data was collected from emergency nurses at four hospitals. Two were not-for-profit: one suburban 150 bed, and one urban 450 bed. Two were for profit: one 261 bed urban and one 135 bed suburban. Sample: A convenience sample was obtained at staff department meetings. The sample consisted of a total of 90 ED nurses; 32 were male, and 58 were female. Average age was 35 ? 44 years. Methodology: Variables measured were support services, professional growth, work intensity, compensation, recognition, effectiveness of management, staff competence, decision-making ability. Results: For overall job satisfaction, 21% were very satisfied, 20.6% were somewhat satisfied, 51% were somewhat dissatisfied, and 7.1% were very dissatisfied. Differences in satisfaction with job attributes were noted between nurses with fewer than five years experience (n=35) and those with five to twenty years experience (n=55). Support Services, &lt; 5 years = 78%, 5-20 years = 63%; Professional Growth, &lt; 5 years = 75%, 5-20 years = 60%; Intensity of Work, &lt; 5 years = 70%, 5-20 years = 61%; Compensation, &lt; 5 years = 75%, 5-20 years = 60%; Recognition, &lt; 5 years 71%, 5-20 years 60%; Effectiveness of Management, &lt; 5 years = 70%, 5-20 years = 62%; Staff Competence, &lt; 5 years = 82%, 5-20 years = 71%; and Decision-Making Ability, &lt; 5 years = 66%, 5-20 years = 71%. Conclusions: Job-related priorities such as recognition, intensity of work, and compensation are paramount for all segments of an ED. Management strategies that empower and support staff to provide patient care may promote satisfaction and retention in EDs. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Understand factors impacting job satisfaction;<br/>2) Identify strategies to increase satisfaction; and 3) Identify factors for retention. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:32:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:32:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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